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Bikes, Pictures, Stories & more => Chat, Offtopic, Meetings & Everything Else => Topic started by: Angus on 30.11. 2017 13:49

Title: Winter layup
Post by: Angus on 30.11. 2017 13:49
Well its cold out there and the roads are covered in salt. I have a list of fettling on the A7 and A10 and more major work on the Norton plus hope to make some progress on the Matchless.
The bikes are unlikely to get much use between now and March, only days when the salt has been washed away and the roads dried out.
So a winter regime is required and I have read various stuff and searched here but am still unsure of ‘best’ practise.
The thing I have done is thoroughly clean the bikes and then apply some ACF50 oily rag style to hopeful keep the dreaded corrosion at bay.
To the questions

1)   Should I run the bikes regularly or only on the few occasions they may actually get used. I usually run them up with the throttle jammed at a very fast idle for about 10 minutes so the engine cases are at least warm.
2)   Should I change the oil before the layup period, after the layup period or just wait until the next scheduled oil change (every 1000 miles).
3)   As I run the bikes I tend to leave petrol in them over winter, that means they are ready to go if that rare day arrives when they are allowed outside. Do others drain the tanks
4)   Are then any other things that are good layup practice.
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: BSARGS650 on 30.11. 2017 14:32
Hi Angus,

Mine are stored in a relatively warm dry garage as integral part of the house.
On lay-up, they are treated to fresh oils.
I keep fuel tanks full to prevent corrosion with added fuel stability product, such as Sta-bil Marine, or some Harley-Davidson equivalent product.  Never had a fuel problem with restarting, even after a 6 month lay-up.
I keep the tyres pumped at correct pressure, ideally they might be better off the ground, but, sometimes rotate them around a bit, though not always - none have developed flat spots.
The battery on the H-D is always hooked up to an optimising intelligent charger.  For the others they are removed and charged periodically.
I have started some, maybe once a month and got them up to what I think is fairly hot to circulate oil and burn off any water.  But again not always - those not started do not seem to suffer anyway.
ACF-50 wiped on with rage is a superior product and I have used it on chromed surfaces.  It can be used without harm on painted surfaces too. The brave Harley boys who ride in winter coat the whole bike, except for tyres and brakes of course and swear no ill effects when washed off after winter riding see the forums.
That is what I do, it is not scientific by any means - I go by "feel" and fortunately no problems...
All the best to all... 
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: BSARGS650 on 30.11. 2017 14:35
Hell.....! I meant rag and not with rage - I care tenderly for them......
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: scotty on 30.11. 2017 16:23
+ 1 re: the Stabil Marine fuel stabiliser

I put some in all of my pressed up gas tanks for the winter lay up and all engines start fine in the spring

S
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: Butch (cb) on 30.11. 2017 17:02
Hell.....! I meant rag and not with rage - I care tenderly for them......

Probably better than with Vim, I had wondered if it was another product you were using in combination.

I just wipe over the bright work with an oily rag. Not so sure about leaving tanks full these days, what with ethanol being hydroscopic - but I guess fuel stabiliser should deal OK with that.
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: jachenbach on 01.12. 2017 01:43
Fill gas tank and treat fuel. Stabil works great for me, many swear by Startron. I remove batteries so that I can easily charge them on occasion over winter. Change oil before storage. Why leave contaminants, some of which are acidic, to do damage over the winter then replace it come spring? Occasionally running for short periods may well be the single worst thing you can do. If you're not going for a ride long enough to get to full temp and keep it there for 20-30 minutes, don't run it at all. Short runs will result in condensation in exhaust and crankcases. A few months inactivity won't do it any harm with even minimal preparation.
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: Black Sheep on 01.12. 2017 07:06
Every year I promise not to use the bikes once the gritters have been out but every year I just can't help myself. A few days ago my wife pointed out there was a short weather window so why not nip up north? So I did. 550 miles over 2 days. Empty roads, not a camper van to be seen. Glorious. The bike was caked in salt when I got back. I'll be out on it again on Sunday. Preparation? A good wash and loads of WD40. Don't panic, it wasn't a BSA, just a Velo.
I try and do winter lay-ups but it's usually a clean, an oil change if it hasn't had one recently and keep the battery charged.
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: A10 JWO on 01.12. 2017 18:00
An old biker told me to spray the bike with the cheapest furniture spray can  polish you can find, no corrosion and it smells nice. Easy to get off.
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: muskrat on 02.12. 2017 06:10
What's a winter layup *????* *dunno*
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: Black Sheep on 02.12. 2017 06:25
For the benefit of our upside-down colonial friends, there is a meteorological phenomenon where the temperature falls to, or below zero degrees celsius. Rain can form a semi-solid slippery condition known as snow. This causes widespread panic and massive transport disruption as each year no-one is prepared for it. All councils therefore fill lorries with rock salt and spread it abundantly over the roads on hearing that there is a remote possibility of a snow shower in Stornoway, normally just before heavy rain which washes it off again. This is sponsored by car manufacturers who want cars to corrode to valueless junk in 10 years or less so that they can entice you to buy their latest 4 wheeled must-have.
Most motorcyclists here keep their pride and joy away from the salt-laden roads for the many months of winter until the temperature creeps up, the spring monsoon cleans the road and the councils have finally used up every last grain of their salt allocation to ensure they can demand an even bigger allocation next financial year. This is known as the winter lay-up.   
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: Tomcat on 02.12. 2017 06:38
Black Sheep, does the salt kill all the grass on the roadside? Other than rusting up your vehicles are there any other re-actions to the salt?  *sick*
Interesting to note councils love allocations over there too!   *fight*
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: Greybeard on 02.12. 2017 10:25
Black Sheep, does the salt kill all the grass on the roadside? Other than rusting up your vehicles are there any other re-actions to the salt?  *sick*
Interesting to note councils love allocations over there too!   *fight*

Older walls facing roads often show erosion at the bottom from salt and sand blasted from vehicle wheels.
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: muskrat on 02.12. 2017 11:05
Sounds like us convicts got the better deal.  *whistle*
That reminds me to put colder plugs in the bikes  ;)
Cheers
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: Black Sheep on 02.12. 2017 14:05
Roadside grass seems to survive the winter's salt spray and runoff presumably because it's dormant. By the time it starts to grow in spring, the rain has diluted it sufficiently to not affect vegetation.
At this time of year I do reckon there's a lot to be said for living in Oz.
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: kiwipom on 02.12. 2017 21:51
hi guys, we don,t get much of a `layoff`here depending what part of the country you are in.  3rd day of summer now yesterday was a very nice 30deg c, today 28/29, we are going to have another hot Xmas, love it, cheers
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: Butch (cb) on 04.12. 2017 09:34
Black Sheep, does the salt kill all the grass on the roadside? Other than rusting up your vehicles are there any other re-actions to the salt?  *sick*
Interesting to note councils love allocations over there too!   *fight*

I had heard that they had taken to mixing in some molasses to the salt to get it to stay coating the roads for a little longer. It draws sheep down onto unfenced roads for a tasty salt lick.

And in my experience it takes more than one wash and blow dry to get the salt off from a really mucky trip. My V50 is still growing fur on its cases after the Dragon Rally excursion at the start of the year.
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: Black Sheep on 04.12. 2017 10:02
It would explain why my sheep graze next to the roadside fence. One other useful item for the shed in this damp climate is a dehumidifier. Some mornings bikes, spares and tools can be dripping condensation. Not good. It's astonishing how much water a dehumidifier can extract. Well worth the money.
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: RoyC on 04.12. 2017 10:22
One other useful item for the shed in this damp climate is a dehumidifier. Some mornings bikes, spares and tools can be dripping condensation. Not good. It's astonishing how much water a dehumidifier can extract. Well worth the money.

What make do you have ?
What happens to it in the garage below freezing ?
Title: Re: Winter layup
Post by: Black Sheep on 04.12. 2017 16:34
I use a MEACO for the main workshop and a smaller, cheaper IGENIX for the shed. The MEACO is more sophisticated with lots of options and is extremely quiet. The IGENIX is simple and a bit noisy. Both have frost protection, so if the temperature drops they stop and flash warning lights. Sound investments if your shed/workshop are prone to damp.