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Bikes, Pictures, Stories & more => Chat, Offtopic, Meetings & Everything Else => Topic started by: A10 JWO on 27.08. 2018 17:38

Title: Welding question.
Post by: A10 JWO on 27.08. 2018 17:38
I did some welding years ago with a 120 Amp portable unit. As I said years ago ( 1970 ). I want to weld an 1/8" angle iron which needs repair as it has a split weld. One of my mates passed on a message that I could pick up and borrow a MIG welder. I thought they were for sheet metal like floor pans. Will this do the job. Thanks.
Title: Re: Welding question.
Post by: Greybeard on 27.08. 2018 18:45
I'd say yes, unless it's a ***-poor cheapo one.
Title: Re: Welding question.
Post by: muskrat on 27.08. 2018 20:47
G'day JWO.
I'm same with welding, late 70's. Take the job to someone that CAN weld or bring them to the job.
Cheers
Title: Re: Welding question.
Post by: harvey mushman on 27.08. 2018 21:09
if you have welded before with arc i am guessing, you will find the mig a breeze when its set up correctly and the object of the weld is suitably clean!

 *smile*
Title: Re: Welding question.
Post by: Greybeard on 27.08. 2018 21:43
Practice on some scrap.
Title: Re: Welding question.
Post by: KiwiGF on 27.08. 2018 21:44
I did some welding years ago with a 120 Amp portable unit. As I said years ago ( 1970 ). I want to weld an 1/8" angle iron which needs repair as it has a split weld. One of my mates passed on a message that I could pick up and borrow a MIG welder. I thought they were for sheet metal like floor pans. Will this do the job. Thanks.

MIG is good at welding thin sheet (with correct technique) but can pretty much be used for any thickness if the machine is big enough. A 120 amp MIG would probably do most 1/8” angle iron welds.

1/8” angle iron would be easy to weld with a plain old stick (arc) welder and (say) 2.5mm rod. MIG would be no easier to use than stick welding on 1/8” (just my opinion).
Title: Re: Welding question.
Post by: coater87 on 28.08. 2018 03:01
 When you use it...

 Listen to the sound, fast bacon frying is what you want.

 Mig really is the easiest welding IMO.

 If the borrowed welder is any good at all, you are not going to have any trouble. They are easy to use, easy to adjust, and with a few minutes practice you can make passable welds.

 If it's one of those good awful dirt cheap ones, even really good welders can't make them go. *sad2*

 Lee
Title: Re: Welding question.
Post by: Rex on 28.08. 2018 09:31
Plus one for all that.
MiG welders made the old arc welders obsolete at a stroke, and any half-decent MiG would do that angle iron easily.
Title: Re: Welding question.
Post by: Topdad on 28.08. 2018 11:29
Living in Liverpool quite alot of my mates were time served welders usually starting out "over the water " in  Camell Lairds " shipyard Birkenhead. Paul who also shared my passion for A10's Jaguar cars and generally anything mechanical could quite literally weld "Sh1t to sh1t "watching him earn a bit more money for his bike etc by welding some rot box back together ,particularly triumph Heralds and vauxhalls was a joy  watching a really skilled guy . He went on to work on the motorways particularly the M6 in Cheshire where he was welding 18" butts together .Anyway being stuck one Saturday morning with a dragging broken exhaust on my Jag "S" type and no money, a pretty usual state of affairs for me  back in the 70's, 2 kids mortgage etc etc when up arrives Paul no gear but ton's of front, pops into our local garage and asks the owner if he could use his MIG welder ,the owner not unsurprisingly said no and any way HIS proper welder was off ,by this time Paul had taken a gander at the machine which he said was pretty good but would be better if it had been set up right ,this drew a blast of basic anglo saxon from said owner only for paul to tell him he'd weld something he need ed doing and he'd be happy with the job. Anyway this worked he spent 10 mins (if that ) setting up the mig and within a few mins had welded up an old mk 3 cortina's chassis ,the look on the owners face was unreal particularly when he was told the gas being used was incorrect and the settings being used weren't suitable either .After that he welded up the exhaust and we went to the pub job done and I survived till payday .
Title: Re: Welding question.
Post by: A10 JWO on 28.08. 2018 13:03
Thanks lads. Did it this morning with the MIG, thoroughly enjoyed myself; memories. Regards.
Title: Re: Welding question.
Post by: RDfella on 28.08. 2018 20:38
Afraid I have to disagree with Harvey and Coater87. Been stick welding steel / stainless for over 50 yrs. I'm not coded, but my welds are pretty good. My life depends on some of them. My gas welding, brazing and soldering are good too. My mig welding ..... After lots of practise I just can't get the hang of it. If it welds at all, it looks like a metallic rubble dump. Can't get the hang of the filler rod coming out at a steady rate and the amps non-adjustable (don't have pedal control) whereas both can be compensated for with stick. Likewise tig - don't even ask. It would appear to be similar to gas welding, but whereas I can gas weld practically anything, I've yet to stick two things together with tig. With gas, you can moderate heat by moving the flame away or placing the filler rod quickly infront of the flame. With tig, moving away has the same effect as stick welding - it gets hotter. So I class stick and gas welding as easy, mig as pretty difficult and tig as impossible. I have to farm out my mig and tig welding. The guys that do that for me are heroes.