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Bikes, Pictures, Stories & more => Other BSAs, Other Bikes, Machinery & Tools => Topic started by: Greybeard on 23.03. 2021 16:04

Title: Deltic engine model
Post by: Greybeard on 23.03. 2021 16:04
When I was a boy, both of my parents worked in the office at Napier Engineering in West London. I was allowed to go in the works occasionally. I remember looking through thick glass at a turbo-prop Eland engine running in a test chamber.
My Pop acquired this static model of a Napier Deltic engine.

The Deltic engine was ingenious:

'The Napier Deltic engine is a British opposed-piston valveless, supercharged uniflow scavenged, two-stroke diesel engine used in marine and locomotive applications, designed and produced by D. Napier & Son. Unusually, the cylinders were disposed in a three-bank triangle, with a crankshaft at each corner of the triangle'

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napier_Deltic
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: Greybeard on 23.03. 2021 16:17
I also have this photo of the Napier Foremen, Superintendents and Charge hands taken in 1913.
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: Greybeard on 23.03. 2021 16:22
Napier were taken over by English Electric. I have a hardback copy of the  wartime diary of the English Electric company.
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: Bsareg on 23.03. 2021 17:14
Similar idea as the horizontal opposed pistons Rootes TS3 engine. Three cylinders, six pistons, three crankshafts and six conrods. Tiny engine in its day for a 140hp diesel. Bit gutless in a wagon but a good marine engine. A very distinctive and loud exhaust. Any idea of the power of the much larger Deltic?
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: Triton Thrasher on 23.03. 2021 17:50
the horizontal opposed pistons Rootes TS3 engine. Three cylinders, six pistons, three crankshafts and six conrods. Tiny engine in its day for a 140hp diesel. Bit gutless in a wagon but a good marine engine. A very distinctive and loud exhaust.

Only one crankshaft.

https://www.sa.hillman.org.au/TS3.htm (https://www.sa.hillman.org.au/TS3.htm)
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: Greybeard on 23.03. 2021 17:59
Any idea of the power of the much larger Deltic?
Over 2000 4000 horsepower when a turbo plus a supercharger were added.
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: Greybeard on 23.03. 2021 18:01
I've just learnt that my model is of the marine version. They used them in some fast torpedo boats. There is/was one moored in Portsmouth Harbour.
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: Rex on 23.03. 2021 18:20
They used them in some Ton class and Hunt class mine layers/sweepers too.
Considered to be too juicy, noisy and complex by some though.
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: Bsareg on 23.03. 2021 19:07
You're right, memory has gone, one crankshaft but 6 big rockers.
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: stu.andrews on 24.03. 2021 11:20
The Deltic prototype locomotive had two Deltic engines fitted. It was rated at 3300 h.p. A very noisy & smoky loco that could be heard a mile off. Not surprising really with 72 pistons! (Six banks of six X 2)  Thank goodness we only have two to worry about.
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: RichardL on 24.03. 2021 11:33
That is, obviously, a very special and rare piece you have. I would guess, one-of-a-kind. Worthy of a museum, in my opinion. Particularly impressed by the amount of detail. It's not like they 3D printed it.

Richard L.
Title: Re: Deltic engine model
Post by: Greybeard on 24.03. 2021 13:16
That is, obviously, a very special and rare piece you have. I would guess, one-of-a-kind. Worthy of a museum, in my opinion. Particularly impressed by the amount of detail. It's not like they 3D printed it.

Richard L.
The various parts have been, I guess, die-cast and attached together. There cannot have been many made. I imagine they were a marketing toy to give to prospective customers.

I've signed up to a Deltic appreciation group on FaceAche; primarily to guage interest in my model. So far no one has mentioned ever seeing one of these models before.

Perhaps I should seek out a suitable museum to donate it to.