The BSA A7-A10 Forum

Technical => A7 & A10 Engine => Topic started by: RichardL on 06.12. 2007 16:42

Title: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 06.12. 2007 16:42
Hello Folks,

While rebuiling my bike (as seen at "Bikes & Pictures" as Richard's 55 A10), I made a lot of tools (rather than spend big money). Here are a couple of pictures of one of them. Just for laughs, can you guess (or do you know) what it's for?
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: groily on 06.12. 2007 18:00
It's a Universal Adjustable Dinosaur Egg Cup for a man who likes his breakfast big .. . when you've made the grill for the toasted soldiers to go with, I'd like a set too. Groily
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: LJ. on 06.12. 2007 19:10

I could be rude but I guess Erling would throw me off the forum! Ermmm, fraid I dont have the foggiest Idea. ???

How long are we going to have to wait for the answer as this is going to play on me all evening/week!
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: G/F DAVE on 06.12. 2007 19:42
Looks to me like a bearing puller maybe drive side main??.If not definatley a egg holder.. Dave....
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: bsa-bill on 06.12. 2007 20:51
My guess -  a bearing puller

All the best _ Bill
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: LJ. on 06.12. 2007 21:12

Surely it can't be a bearing puller, It doesn't look strong enough. It looks like it grips something and I can only think of an ampmeter, but I dont know why an ampmeter would need to be in this?? I am intrudged by the counter sunk screws... Maybe its a holder for polishing something??

Grrrrrrrrr *problem*
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: a10gf on 06.12. 2007 21:22
This is great  *smile* , you got me trying to remember anything I found difficult while working on the bike, trying to guess when I would have needed your invention... no solution to the riddle yet.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 06.12. 2007 21:48
Drum roll please....Dave is correct, drive-side main bearing puller. However, I will now, also, be using it as a dinosaur egg cup. Groily, thanks for the idea.

It's made from a door hinge, two bits of aluminum, a thick scrap of lexan, some all-thread, and miscellaneous screws and nuts. (No comments about which nut has the screw loose, please!)

Richard

P.S.  Apologies if this is more photos than it's worth.

Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: G/F DAVE on 07.12. 2007 21:24
AAHAA!! Thought it was I have made a similiar item for my A10. I used it for setting end float for crankshaft to remove bearing inner race ,But now have a RHP  inner race which has been ground slightly on the inside face so it is a push fit on crankshaft, once I establish the shims needed I  just fit the inner bearing I,m going to use. I also have another home brew tool I have made for my A10 to make life easier. If I can sort out a photo I,ll post on this site. Maybe other owners have similar items in their toolkit & would like to share them with us ?. ....G/F DAVE
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: bsa-bill on 08.12. 2007 10:16
Thought that was what it would be having gone through the bearing removal process myself, might look a bit on the light side as has been said but the problem with that bearing is access without chewing up the roller cage.
Wish I'd made one , I bought a proper bearing separator but it still damaged the bearing, a better buy was a dial gauge ( and with a bit of luck I'm sure ) I was able to work out the shims I needed first time.

All the best - Bill
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: a10gf on 08.12. 2007 14:03
The good stuff about Richard's clever device is the contact area, the pressure gets distributed evenly to the whole bearing, and no damage to edges\rollers.
Yes, more homemade tools posts welcomed !
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 08.12. 2007 15:32
Thanks for noticing. I meant to mention the benifits of encircling the entire bearing and pulling by the cage. Also, if anyone wants to replicate this, be sure to notice the bevel on the edge of the circle. this allows grabbing the bearing without smashing the shims.

According the Bill, the official bearing puller damaged his bearing, I did not have that problem, however, it is important to try to adjust the four pulling nuts as evenly as possible because the bearing tends to walk off the shaft. I think this is not a problem, as long as the steps are small, therefore, not distorting the roundness of the inner race. This might be a point for comment by someone with more experience than myself.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: LJ. on 08.12. 2007 19:28

Well it's rained all day today, so I got on with making a usefull tool!  *smile* Something I have needed to make for a long time to cure the frustration of alighing front and back wheels. It was an easy job, the pictures tell the story but the biggest secret here is using some of those incredibly powerfull NEODYMIUM magnets, you'll find these quite cheaply on ebay. I must say that the tool worked instantly and showed me just how much the Red A10s back wheel was out of line, the blue one was fine!

Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: LJ. on 08.12. 2007 19:45
Okay... I could not insult your inteligence with the wheel aligner tool as it was a bit obvious... But what is this? I made this very simple tool sometime ago and has prooved useful on occasions.

P.S. The dynamo end cap is only to show the size of the tool!
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: bsa-bill on 08.12. 2007 21:59
looks like a tool for screwing up or out a hub bearing retainer.

Speaking of which did you know front and rear are different.

All the best - Bill
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: LJ. on 08.12. 2007 22:31
looks like a tool for screwing up or out a hub bearing retainer
Speaking of which did you know front and rear are differentj

Correct! Now you got me wondering if I last used it for front or rear! Thanks! That means I gotta make another one now....  *lol*

Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: bsa-bill on 09.12. 2007 11:44
I don't know that the tool would not fit front and rear, maybe the holes are the same distance apart, I do know that the front and rear retainers are different as I bought a new one from C&D Autos and with their usual efficiency they pointed out the retainers had different part numbers.
This might account for the fact I could not get one of them to tighten, looked like it was wrong threaded ( which was the reason for the purchase of a new one)

Don't know what happened to my smilies in my last mail  *sad2*
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: a10gf on 09.12. 2007 14:39
Some plunger hub stuff here http://www.a7a10.net/BSA/rearwheel.htm & http://www.a7a10.net/BSA/techpics/wbfront.jpg , I seem to remember I battled with the rear until discovering the LH threads...  *red*
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: LJ. on 23.05. 2008 18:36
I wonder if BSA made such a tool for pushing on the front wheel hub? I found it to be a bit of a pig to do today so an ingenuity had to be thought of... A good look around the workshop shed and I come across a filter that had been used in my sandblast cabinette. Resting the wheel on a kitchen washing up bowl and a good blow onto a mallet ensures the perfect job done!  *clap*

Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: LJ. on 23.05. 2008 22:53
Yep! Indeed perfect, the rubber rubber seal saved the paint from getting damaged. The mallet although not home made was used as a flat block to save the filter from getting damaged when one hefty blow from the engineers hammer struck. The mallet is an old time tool for wooden ended chisels. Probably now-a-days a rubber hammer is used in stead.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: snowbeard on 28.05. 2008 23:53
(http://img150.imageshack.us/img150/4144/raceremoverlp4.gif)

for removing the rear wheel bearing, I think this was to hold the bearing to remove it from the spindle/spacer

and the end of the bar is ground to use to pound on just the outer race thru the hub

(http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/4897/outerracevq1.gif)

just about everything in my toolkit is homemade so far...
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 20.08. 2008 05:47
Well, I never found my lost pushrod comb (mentioned under "Spending Money" in chat). Again, being too impatient and too cheap (especially when I know there is one lying around here), I made my own by copying a photo from eBay, pasting it to AutoCad (drafting program), scaling it using the known dimension between rockerbox studs, printing it, gluing it to a piece of sheet metal and cutting it out on my band saw. After a small amount of filing, it worked and here it is.

Richard
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: tombeau on 20.08. 2008 08:21
I've got long,skinny fingers. After spending about 10 minutes faffing about with the comb I discovered I didnt need it.
I have a fork puller upper made from an old top nut and some threaded rod and nuts.
I've also got a fork seal holder remover like Beezalex's. A friend knocked it up whilst watching me fail to remove one with my usual trick of using a big jubilee clip around a bit of old inner tube and a pair of stilsens.

Cheers,
Tombeau
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: olev on 10.12. 2008 12:16
I removed the blind camshaft bush in the drive side crankcase tonight.
The head of a 1/4" X 2 1/2" mushroom head (or cup head) bolt just fits in the bore and can be hooked under the back of the bush. lay a piece of metal with a hole over the thread, add a nut and wind her out.
It was all over before the first beer was opened.
hmmm.. that doesn't seem to make much sense. should have stopped after the first beer.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: a10gf on 27.08. 2009 13:47
To revive this topic, my latest invention (version 0.9). Anybody spots what it does ?
(spanner not used or related, size ref only)
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: terryk on 27.08. 2009 14:34
I'd say its for plug hole to mark top dead center and timing before TDC
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: a10gf on 27.08. 2009 15:14
Yes, timing.

90 deg to piston. The bottom clip (11\32 width) on to mark TDC, 2nd clip goes on, removing 1st clip, rotating crank, bar slides freely following piston, carefully watching for 2nd clip to bottom out.
Presto 11\32 advance.

Just another twist to the piece of wire 'tool'. Took some time though to find some parts that could be used.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 27.08. 2009 16:30
Erling,

Perhaps you recall my own home-made version shown at http://www.a7a10.net/forum/index.php?topic=156.msg5969#msg5969

Your's seems a bit less tedious in the usage but a bit more complicated in the fabrication.

Richard L.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: Desburnett on 27.08. 2009 23:21
Just looking through some old posts and read the technique of removing the blind camshaft bush using a modified bolt arrangement.
The trick way to remove blind bushes is to obtain a dowel / shaft close to the internal diameter (smaller)of the bush, fill the bush with heavy duty grease then insert the dowel into the bush and strike the end with a hammer.
The dowel acts hydraulicly on the grease which forces the bush out of its blind cavity.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 02.10. 2009 23:55
Borrowing a page from LJ's book, I bodged together (his wasn't bodged) this pump for sucking oil out of the tank. The piston is an old scrap from someone trying to turn a bed knob, or something, on the wood lathe in the shop attached to my office. I turned an electric hand drill into a lathe of my own to cut the groove for the o-ring. I think, all together, parts around $10, plus some junk in the garage. It worked well, except when I stuffed a stiff wire up the tube (as shown). I'm going to try lashing the stiff wire to the outside of the tube.

Hope this isn't too boring.

Richard L.

Edit: Oh, no! Sloppy work area showing. I am devastated.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 12.06. 2010 18:55
This is cool, so I took the liberty of copying some of MikeN's text plus the picture of the lever tool here at Home-Made Tools. I trust this is not a policy breach.

From: MikeN

"Ive been running a Tony hayward belt drive kit on  my "A" for the last 5 years....I use the nice SRM crankshaft nut that they sell ( I might have had to modify it a bit on a lathe, I cant remember now). I also made up a long lever type tool that I bandsawed from a bit of 1/4" alloy plate about 450mm long. I unscrewed the belt retaining flange from the crankshaft pulley and screwed my lever on in its place. By pulling on this lever and the ring spanner that fits the SRM nut and making a sort of grrrnnnfff noise I was able to do it up extremely tight with no risk of anything slipping or getting damaged.bI used Loctite thread locker for the nut."

"Here is a pic of the tool I made for tightening up the crankshaft nut. I remove the screwed-on flange from the pulley and bolt on the lever/tool. The small puller is for removing my dynamo pulley. The larger puller is for extracting the crankshaft pulley."
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: MikeN on 14.06. 2010 20:29
Heres another tool I made to remove the fork seal holders. When I made my first one, the tommy bar handle was too feeble and bent when I tried to undo the extremely tight chrome holders.So i made this stronger one which did the job.

http://img62.imageshack.us/img62/356/001jah.jpg


The secoond pic shows a box of tools that ive fabricated over the years.Some for bikes so long gone i cant remember what they do now. I usually give them away with a bike when I sell it.

http://img822.imageshack.us/img822/1096/002t.jpg

Mike
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 14.06. 2010 20:41
Wow! That's a great collection, can we just reach in and borrow what we need?

I think I am correct in noticing the steam engine in one photo. I can't name the type, but I bet Lee (coater87) could. He is a model ship enthusiast in deep (though I'm prettry sure that one is not from a boat or ship).

Richard L.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: MikeN on 14.06. 2010 21:40
Yes, Richard thats the boiler and cylinder block for a 6" to the foot scale steam tractor that im building . Its now about 90% complete now and I will start painting it shortly. When its done i hope to register it for road use.

heres another tool:
http://img808.imageshack.us/img808/1240/013dq.jpg
Its a slide hammer I made for front forks. You can use it for assemling and diassembly depending which way you work the slide.  Different attatchments for different forks screw on the end.
MN
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 12.08. 2011 15:54
It's nice to carry a select pouch of tools in the toolbox, but a good tool to open and, particularly, close the toolbox seemed a burden to put in the pocket. I came up with this, no biggie, but it has been handy and out of the way (stashed at the headstock). I just wish I had wiped the bike down before taking these embarassing closeups.

Richard L.

P.S. That's not the right belt color for on the tank sticker for a '55, is it?
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: iansoady on 12.08. 2011 17:44
Nice to see this thread resuscitated.

Does anyone have the dimensions for the fork oil seal holder tool? Looks as though they start off with a bit of scaffold tube.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: Goldy on 12.08. 2011 20:21
The fork seal tool that I made is 1 7/16" ID, 1 5/8" OD and the two spigots are 1/2" wide and protrude out 5/32".
Title: Re: Home-made tools Cush Nut Tightening
Post by: RichardL on 26.04. 2014 19:18
I don't know if this is more technique than tool, but it worked a treat (as some would say). Basically, about $2.00 of 3/32" aircraft cable and clamps from the hardware store. Notice that the cable is wrapped around two chain links, just in case it mattered for distributing the force. Also, notice the wood wedges in the cush spring that keep the cush drive from riding over the lobes while tightening the nut.

I hope others might find this handy.

Richard L.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: kiwipom on 27.04. 2014 05:08
hi guys/Richard L, the catch on my toolbox has a neat extra bit that does not need a special tool to undue it, don`t know if it is the original catch but maybe it should have been,cheers
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: Brian on 27.04. 2014 05:37
Now that is a very good little modification, something I am definitely going to do to mine.

I always carry a "stubby" screwdriver in my pocket.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 27.04. 2014 06:04
I believe the catch on Kiwipom's tool box is a modern piece from Dzus.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: kiwipom on 27.04. 2014 11:07
hi guys/ Richard it looks like you are right, well done. Might be a worthwhile upgrade,cheers
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: duTch on 06.02. 2015 14:25

 I have a feeling some Notruns used something like that..?
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: pato08 on 07.02. 2015 07:15
These catches are used on Harley Davidson FLH models to hold the saddle bags on the bike
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RoyC on 07.02. 2018 07:11
These catches are used on Harley Davidson FLH models to hold the saddle bags on the bike
I have just ordered a couple, will see how good they fit when they arrive.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: orabanda on 07.02. 2018 11:22
A friend in his eighties rang recently and offered me a collection of whitworth bolts and nuts he had accumulated over a lifetime of riding and maintaining (british) motorcycles.

He was the frailest I have seen him, and had dispersed all of his bikes except two; one of which was the plunger Gold Star which he proudly started.

He also gave me this little funnel he probably made in 1950; very ingenious - made filling the BSA gearbox a breeze!

I hope to be using it for the next 25 years or so, but will make sure I pass it on to the next generation when the time comes.

Here's to you, Mr Crocker!

Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: Topdad on 07.02. 2018 14:25
What a really useful funnel ,he must have been ***** off spilling oil as we all do with other methods .Reminds me of a good  friend and neighbour who always nattered to me about my A10 as he'd had one back in his day , he gave me a tuneup  meter for checking fuel mixture ,after a " bit of a tidy up" then next week a few  whitworth spanners and finally two brand new old stock valve sealers made in stainless ,he'd had 'em for yrs . Turned out He'd been diagnosed with cancer caused by asbestos and just wanted something of his to remain in use after he was gone ,so his wife told me after He'd died .I still use the tune up and won't go anywhere without the valve caps fitted , (thank you Jack) , so keep an eye on your mate Richard ,you never know , cheers Bob.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: orabanda on 07.02. 2018 16:14
20 years ago I gave him a couple of frames from 1920's Indian Scout; I didn't ask for any payment.
This is the Karma coming through!
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: Greybeard on 07.02. 2018 17:11
What a really useful funnel ,he must have been ***** off spilling oil as we all do with other methods.
I use a plastic bottle of gearbox oil that has a handy tube.

Quote
finally two brand new old stock valve sealers
Do mean tyre/tire valves?
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RogerSB on 07.02. 2018 18:31
but a good tool to open and, particularly, close the toolbox seemed a burden to put in the pocket.


Here's mine - it cost 2 pence - so I splashed out and got 3, 1 in the shed, 1 in the garage, 1 in my pocket ;)
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RoyC on 07.02. 2018 18:40
but a good tool to open and, particularly, close the toolbox seemed a burden to put in the pocket.


Here's mine - it cost 2 pence - so I splashed out and got 3, 1 in the shed, 1 in the garage, 1 in my pocket ;)
and if it slips, there goes your paint.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RogerSB on 07.02. 2018 18:55
but a good tool to open and, particularly, close the toolbox seemed a burden to put in the pocket.

Here's mine - it cost 2 pence - so I splashed out and got 3, 1 in the shed, 1 in the garage, 1 in my pocket ;)
and if it slips, there goes your paint.
I dare it to slip, it'll get a good Kicking!
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: tlmark on 08.02. 2018 11:08
Not exactly homemade, well not by me anyway. I got this yesterday for pulling the crankshaft pinion off.

and it works brilliantly here is the link.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Bsa-twins-A7-10-crank-pinion-puller/263428014723?hash=item3d55888283:g:T1cAAOSw0exaAC-T


oh yeah it only works on 67/339  that's the one with the machined flats on it.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 19.02. 2018 00:12
My new timing stick. Graticule created and printed using AutoCad (1/32" incements) glued to 3/16" D. aluminum tube and covered with clear packing tape. A screw inserted on the right (top) end makes it heavy enough. Ball bearing on the left (bottom) end makes it ride properly on top of the piston. BTW, used many times (before the old graticule wore off) without losing the ball.

Richard L.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: muskrat on 19.02. 2018 06:18
G'day Richard.
Wouldn't a pushrod do?
This is my timing tool. (think I've mentioned it before) Smash the porcelain out of an old plug and tap the body 3/8 cyc. Get the piston to the desired height using verniers down the plug hole. Insert plug into head then screw a 3/8 cyc stud in (with red loctite) till it just touches the piston. Lower piston and remove plug. Once loctite has set you have a tool to set timing the same every time.
Also used to find TDC in conjunction with a degree wheel on the crank. Turn crank so piston is down the bore. Insert plug and turn crank till piston just touches the plug. Mark degree wheel then turn the crank back till it touches again and mark. Exactly half way between the marks is TDC.
Cheers
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 19.02. 2018 13:49
Well, I showed it without the guide/indicator (now pictured with the magnet that holds it to a head bolt).  I'm a little uncomfortable with bumping the piston up against a stop. Not sure I could do it gently enough when turning over the engine with the rear wheel.  I think of the stick as a vernier that moves with the piston and is accurate to about 1/64". I don't have a timing disk, but even if I did, I'd rather not open the primary just to set timing. It's bad enough that the timing cover has to come off. (Insert Orabanda's picture of magneto flange slots here.) I suppose you don't like to remove the timing cover either, which, I also suppose, is why you made the device. I have kinda settled on 11/32" as the target, but like the idea of trying other values if I want. That would be a bit tricky with red Loctite (unless you made a set, of course).

This should, appropriately, be followed by "I'm probably wrong."

Richard L.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: muskrat on 19.02. 2018 19:51
G'day Richard.
I'm a little uncomfortable with bumping the piston up against a stop. Not sure I could do it gently enough when turning over the engine with the rear wheel.
I know what you mean mate. 99% of the time I have one or both covers off.
Cheers
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: Greybeard on 19.02. 2018 23:03
Plugs out, bike in fourth, turn back wheel, engine turns slowly.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 20.02. 2018 02:33
It's still a bump, but suppose one would soon get the feel. Still, not giving up my timing stick.

Richard L.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: muskrat on 20.02. 2018 08:05
Good onya mate. We all have our favorite way of doing things. I learnt the hard way, the next model will have a nylon stud  *rant*.
Cheers
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: BVSR on 20.02. 2018 08:16
Cush drive and mainshaft nut loosening/tightening tools:
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 20.02. 2018 11:48
Good ones. I believe I'm gonna make me one of them bars.

Richard L.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: Colsbeeza on 21.02. 2018 02:35
I made this for the Timing Side Pinion in 1969 for my 1957 A7. Worked quite well.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: Greybeard on 28.02. 2018 11:58
Tools what I have made:
1) Engine bench mount; bolts onto gearbox mounting holes. Single long bolt goes through bench allowing rotation.
2) Fork seal tool. Made from an old bit of tube and strengthened with a piece of exhaust pipe.
3) Plunger spring compressor. Method now superceded.
4) Fork stanchion puller-upper. Threaded rod with an old stanchion nut welded on and then ground down to fit through the yoke hole.
5) BTDC stop. When cylinder head is off this is bolted straight to block using head bolts with spacers. Engine is reversed then slowly brought forward to the stop screw which is set to stop the piston at correct BTDC.
6) Dynamo blanking piece, (quickly made) so I could ride the bike to the dynamo repair man, (chain removed of course) without getting too much muck in the chamber.
7) Cylinder head gasket locating studs, made from old head bolts. Just stops the gasket moving while I get the head back on.
8) Petrol pipe ferrule crimper, made out of a large nut cut in half. Use vice to squeeze together.

ITHANKYOU!
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: Colsbeeza on 18.06. 2018 01:37
Speedo Needle Tool made in 1969. Just found it in a clean-up.
Title: Re: Home-made tools
Post by: RichardL on 06.04. 2019 19:55
Well, this could have gone in the continuing story of trying to get my forks to slide freely in the legs from my A7, but that is such old news now. Winter here was really cold a lot of the time, so the garage was not that much fun.

Anyway, I came up with this idea for a fork-leg hone that would reach past the pin at the bottom of the leg. It's an old stantion with a notch cut for emery paper and driven with a drill motor using the nut from my homemade stantion installation tool.

Here is a link to a video of it getting used. https://youtu.be/zo-11td_uB4 .  Been busy, so I haven't even tested the leg since running the hone. I'll let you know if it worked, helped, or is the destroyer of worlds.

Richard L.