The BSA A7-A10 Forum

Bikes, Pictures, Stories & more => Chat, Offtopic, Meetings & Everything Else => Topic started by: Mosin on 30.06. 2011 20:35

Title: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: Mosin on 30.06. 2011 20:35
Like many BSA A series owners, I use straight 40 engine oil and change it religiously every 1000 miles. Now as well as being a bit of a petrol head, I'm also a bit ecologically minded and can't help feel that it's a waste just to dispose of all this oil when it might have other potential uses - especially when I can quite easily cover 1000 miles every three weeks or so in the summer, so I am amassing quite a stock of the stuff.

I have been using the old stuff as chain lubricant in my chainsaw for the past year or so and it seems to work a treat, but was wondering if any other enterprising forum members had come up with innovative uses for their old straight 40?
Title: Re: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: wilko on 30.06. 2011 23:30
Straight into my car which burns a bit!
Title: Re: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: orabanda on 01.07. 2011 01:37
Use it in a Triumph!
Title: Re: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: RichardL on 01.07. 2011 03:41
Windmill lubrication.
Title: Re: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: muskrat on 01.07. 2011 03:54
Paint the fence, stops rot, white ants and graffiti.
Cheers
Title: Re: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: chaterlea25 on 01.07. 2011 22:28
Hi All,
A friend of mine built a setup to burn waste oil to heat his house  *smile*

A special boiler atomising air compressor and a preheater  are some of the bits I remember seeing

Cheers
John
Title: Re: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: bsa-bill on 02.07. 2011 09:09
I'm surprised (well maybe not) we still have waste oil.
I recall watching Tomorrows way back in the early seventies ? where they had an old A40 running with a special filter, it had done over 70 K miles on the same oil, although factor into that top ups.
The filter was just like a toilet roll and the oil went through it longways, between the rolls of filter paper rather than through them, only problem they found was the need for a water collector to remove water formed by condensation.
Ford used  filter like this on some tractors when turbo chargers came the norm .

I'm not for one minute suggesting the oil companies had anything to do with the fact it hasn't been heard of since
Title: Re: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: muskrat on 02.07. 2011 10:00
I remember that one Bill, in fact was only talking to the boss about it a few weeks ago. Wonder how we can get details of it.
Cheers
Title: Re: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: orabanda on 02.07. 2011 12:33
"Dunny Roll" type filters are low quality technology mainly because the particle removal efficiency falls away dramatically, as the element starts to block.
They rely on the depth of the media pack to allow (potentially) lage dirt holding capacity, but the media pack lacks support and "opens up" and releases contamient down stream, once the differential pressure starts to rise (media starts blocking).

Users are fooled into thinking they are getting good element life, because these elements seldom achieve sufficient differential pressure (dp) for the blockage indicators to function.

However, downstream oil samples are usually just as dirty as upstream samples.

The typical (cheap) automotive spin-on element as fitted to our vehicles is better value. The media is usually cellulose (paper) and doesn't have the same surface area as the dunny roll elements, but they are more effective because they retain more particles at a higher dp.

There is much more efficient media available than cellulose, but not canned for the cheap automotive market.

It is inorganic fibre, as used in any decent hydraulic filter; developed and pioneered by Pall Corporation in the late 60's. However as used by the majority of automotive manufacturers, the cellulose media spin-on canister they use cost them about $1, and removes about one in every two of the particles of the can's rating (50% efficient);  by comparison the quality hydraulic filter media would remove 999 of every 1,000 partices of the element's rating (99.99% efficient) and would cost perhaps $30.

Title: Re: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: MG on 02.07. 2011 13:35
And you have to bear in mind, that however excellent the filtration is, the oil will still decay with age and use. Additives get used up and sheer stress causes cracking of the long-chained carbon-hydrids.
Title: Re: Uses for old engine oil
Post by: bsa-bill on 02.07. 2011 15:52
OK orabanda and MG I'll let the oils giants off this time

Damn, you just can't get a good old conspiracy plot going these days