Author Topic: A Plunger assembly method  (Read 1578 times)

Online Greybeard

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A Plunger assembly method
« on: 17.08. 2016 19:53 »
Last time I assembled my plunger assemblies I made a simple tool from threaded rod that compressed the springs but had the effect of scratching the shroud paint as the large washers were slid out. I reassembled my plungers today and found a way to do it without any damage. I first tried Muskys method; i.e. muscle power, but I nearly did myself a mischief! (Musky must have one of those Charles Atlas body building machines).
I discovered that the bike needed to be strapped down to my hoist for this. I put the inner suspension rod into the top hole so only a small amount was sticking out and locked it with a bolt, (pic 1). That was to locate the top of the assembly. I then used my hydraulic trolly jack to lift the bottom of the plunger until it was at the same height as the frame then simply slid the bottom of the assembly into the frame. I used a nice flat block of wood on the jack and lifted very carefully to make sure the thing didn't jump sideways and take my arm off.

Online morris

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Re: Plunger reassembly
« Reply #1 on: 17.08. 2016 20:12 »
Just be very careful when knocking them in... They can make a nasty jump and bounce through every corner of the shed. DAMHIK... *eek* *smile*
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Online Greybeard

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Re: Plunger reassembly
« Reply #2 on: 17.08. 2016 20:23 »
Just be very careful when knocking them in... They can make a nasty jump and bounce through every corner of the shed. DAMHIK... *eek* *smile*
I know; when I took the first one out bits sproinged all over my shed! I was ready for the second one.
Today I held the assembly steady and just pushed the unit off the wood block, no knocking required. Agreed, dealing with big springs can be hazardous to your health.

Offline muskrat

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Re: A Plunger assembly method
« Reply #3 on: 17.08. 2016 21:26 »
I just use brute force by hand.
The springs in a Trihard sprung hub have killed a few home mechanics!
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
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Online WozzA

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Re: A Plunger assembly method
« Reply #4 on: 18.08. 2016 07:06 »
My first attempt to get them in was the threaded rod method, I was standing above
the springs & screwing the nut when the sliding part let go...   :o
The top spring shot out at an amazing speed between my legs hitting the shed roof..
Almost taking the family jewels with it...   *eek*     ::hh::
I decided not to risk them again so tried Muskys method of brute force on the 2nd attempt
& they slipped straight in..  ( the springs I mean )  *wink2*
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Offline a10gf

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Re: A Plunger assembly method
« Reply #5 on: 18.08. 2016 10:04 »
Yes, always stay very alert when working with springs.
Greetings from another DAMHIK...

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Online Greybeard

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Re: A Plunger assembly method
« Reply #6 on: 18.08. 2016 20:39 »
I just use brute force by hand.
Couldn't do it! In fact I was lifting one side of the machine off the ground and putting a large ring mark onto my palm!  *doubt* Might have done it by working from above rather than pushing up. Half the trouble is that the whole thing and my hands were covered in grease by the time I'd assembled the parts. The jack method was simple, fairly safe and easy-peasy.

Offline Angus

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Re: A Plunger assembly method
« Reply #7 on: 18.08. 2016 22:06 »
I am about to have my first plunger disassembly experience as the Norton runs lovely but the plungers appear solid so will take them apart and then this will have been helpful I hope to get them back together.
1961 A7 since 1976
1960 A10 Gold Flash Super Profile Bike
1958 Matchless G80 Project
1952 Norton Model 7 Plunger
1950 T100

Online Greybeard

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Re: A Plunger assembly method
« Reply #8 on: 18.08. 2016 22:10 »
I am about to have my first plunger disassembly experience as the Norton runs lovely but the plungers appear solid so will take them apart and then this will have been helpful I hope to get them back together.
Didn't know you had a Notrun. Are the plungers similar to BSA ones? Can I see a picture?

Offline Angus

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Re: A Plunger assembly method
« Reply #9 on: 19.08. 2016 09:12 »
Hopefully not breaking forum rules as not in chat. Purchased just over a month ago as wanted something different and running/usable. Not quite usable yet with plunger issue and wiring issue. I used the Notrun name when I posted about it in http://www.a7a10.net/forum/index.php?topic=10868.msg81524#msg81524. Here's a closer look at the plungers, I think they are very similar having looked at both parts books.
1961 A7 since 1976
1960 A10 Gold Flash Super Profile Bike
1958 Matchless G80 Project
1952 Norton Model 7 Plunger
1950 T100

Online Greybeard

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Re: A Plunger assembly method
« Reply #10 on: 19.08. 2016 09:27 »
Yes Angus, those look very similar to the Beeza ones.

Offline duTch

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Re: A Plunger assembly method
« Reply #11 on: 19.08. 2016 09:37 »

 I remember Angus introduce the No*t on, I deferred.
  Been trying to butt in on this on the phone on the job, but it's 'ahem' broke-ish;-....
 When i did my Plunger units, I did the booker-rod system, at least to a point, but if I have to do it again, I'll pre-plan it and do something different, but at this stage- *dunno*
 
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