Author Topic: Timing cover gaskets  (Read 720 times)

Offline a101960

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Timing cover gaskets
« on: 30.09. 2016 10:27 »
I have a very slight leak at the bottom of the timing cover. I can't tell if it is the inner or outer cover gasket that needs replacing, so I intend to replace both of them. I have seen a pair of cork gaskets advertised (1/16" thick) before I buy them does cork have any advantage over the conventional gaskets? I am also a bit concerned that 1/16" might be to thick. Just thought I would check to see what experiences amyone might have had. Secondly, can the inner timing cover be removed without removing the oil pump? I should add that I have a rev counter fitted. Would that make any difference? It's all a bit of a pain having to do this, but the leak will only get worse over time, so it's best that I get stuck in and do something about it.
John

Online bsa-bill

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Re: Timing cover gaskets
« Reply #1 on: 30.09. 2016 10:37 »
Yes I have some cork gaskets, never used them as they do seem a bit thick.
One thing to consider is the breather cork you may need to put a thicker cork spacer in there
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Online chaterlea25

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Re: Timing cover gaskets
« Reply #2 on: 30.09. 2016 18:47 »
Hi,
Cork would be a real bad choice for these location  *eek*
Narrow mating faces will just squez the cork out of place
As Bill said it will also upset the breather cork, but I would probably be fitting a new one anyway???
You need to remove the rev counter drive spindle, the pump can stay in place
You also need to remove the dynamo drive sprocket (or pulley)
Are you sure that the leak is from the gaskets not the PRV ?

John
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1963 RGS (ongoing)

Offline a101960

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Re: Timing cover gaskets
« Reply #3 on: 01.10. 2016 16:23 »
Quote
Are you sure that the leak is from the gaskets not the PRV ?
John, To be honest, no I am not entirely sure about the source of the leak. Because it felt a bit oily below the PRV I did check that out. What I found was that the PRV was relatively loose (not much more than finger tight). I am not sure what the cause of that was because I have never touched it until I checked it out.  Anyway, I removed the PRV from the engine, replaced the fibre washers, and reassembled it all using a little Loctite 542 thread sealant. Hopefully that particuler leakage source is now fixed and cured. The weather is forecast to be fair tomorrow so I will take the bike out for a run and see what happens. When I removed the exhuast pipe so that I could get to the PRV I did notice that the underside of the timing covers were wet with oil. It now remains to been seen weather this was oil that had migrated down from the PRV leak, or if it is yet another leakage source. To answer your question about the cork sealing washer, if I have to replace the timing cover gaskets then I do intend to fit a new one.
John

Online RichardL

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Re: Timing cover gaskets
« Reply #4 on: 01.10. 2016 17:15 »
John,

You might try taping some paper towels (or, as I did, feminine napkins) around the points of possible leakage as a leak location detector. Take a short ride and you should get some interesting answers.

Richard L.
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Offline a101960

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Re: Timing cover gaskets
« Reply #5 on: 01.10. 2016 18:54 »
Quote
You might try taping some paper towels (or, as I did, feminine napkins) around the points of possible leakage as a leak location detector. Take a short ride and you should get some interesting answers.
Richard, that is an inspirational piece of thinking! I will try that. Thank you so much for that very clever idea. I am not talking big leaks mind, more in the nature of minor weep.  I would not say that I am obssesive about it, but having said that it is a major irritant, and I want to eradicate this constant sorce of anoyance to me.
John

Online metalflake11

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Re: Timing cover gaskets
« Reply #6 on: 01.10. 2016 18:56 »
John,

You might try taping some paper towels (or, as I did, feminine napkins) around the points of possible leakage as a leak location detector. Take a short ride and you should get some interesting answers.

Richard L.

You may also get some interesting questions! *eek*
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Offline patcross

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Re: Timing cover gaskets
« Reply #7 on: 02.10. 2016 14:50 »
would that be like your bike wearing depends? lol. Just had to. I always use the thin gaskets that come with the gasket set, lay it on a piece of cardboard and put at thin film on both sides of permatex's right stuff black rtv. It wont leak from there guaranteed.

Offline a101960

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Re: Timing cover gaskets
« Reply #8 on: 02.10. 2016 15:34 »
Well, I have just done 50 miles and when I got back the engine was completely dry, so it looks very much like the PVR being only finger tight was the culprit. Like I said in an earlier post I don't know how or why it came to be like that. Hopefully the two new fibre washers and thread sealant have resolved the problem. I must say that I am rather glad that I did not go at it like a bull in a china shop ripping off the timing cover gaskets. Sod's law being what it is I could well have created a problem where there was no problem! Obviously the oil had been blowing back and lead me to a false assumption. Richard, I did not put anything in place as you suggested while I was out riding, but I have done so now in order to highlight any drips that might appear while the bike is standing over night. It is still a darn good idea though. Just one problem while I was out. Approaching the traffic lights the engine stalled. Can you guess what I am going to say? Of course you can. Would it re-start? no way!!! Anyway I did eventually get restarted (why do they do that I wonder?) and I stopped a couple of times to check out the starting. Needless to say it had reverted back to being a first kick starter. Lord only knows what the problem was, anyone got any suggestions? Oh the joys of motorcycling.
John