Author Topic: Twist Grip  (Read 931 times)

Offline RoyC

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2017
  • Posts: 1102
  • Karma: 7
Twist Grip
« on: 08.07. 2017 21:09 »
Any one got any useful tips for tightening up the rubber on the twistgrip ?
Its not very loose it just gradually works its way off.
Roy.
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
Staffordshire UK

Offline Sluggo

  • Serial Hoarder, or Eccentric Collector depending on viewpoint
  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jun 2017
  • Posts: 639
  • Karma: 11
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #1 on: 08.07. 2017 21:31 »
Piece of .032" thou stainless acft safety wire properly twisted and tied (usually double wound around and nice pig tail crimped over) on the end or extreme inside can work,.  I use it sometimes on kicker lever rubbers and foot pegs where the rubber is prone to slide off.  (modern repop stuff is pretty poor quality on the rubber parts issue)

But on grips I use 3m contact cement for trim and emblems. (Commercial body shop grade) because I have had 3 incidents where I dropped a bike where the grip slid off. Not while riding but unloading out of a trailer and once setting up at a bike display at a show (Very embarrassing)

I know Bill G. Owner of JRC engineering and he told me once about a friend who tragically died some years back in California on a vintage club ride.  I am not 100% clear on circumstances but my recollection of the tale was some spirited riding in the Southern Calif Canyons on a vintage bike and the gentleman had one of the grips slide off while leaned over in a curve which caused some distress and a crash where the guy went over the edge down into a canyon, Bill said when the first responders brought the body back up from the bottom of the canyon the offending grip was still clutched in his hands.   Bill is not prone to exaggerate and was pretty emotional about the death so that story made a big impression on me.  Glue the bastards and call it good has been my attitude ever since. 
Sadly,, I have had to change bars and bemoaned the lack of ability to remove the grips but small price to pay.  YRMV *smiley4*
Remember that any advice received on a free internet forum is generally worth about 1/2 of what you paid for it.
We overcharge every 3rd customer to pass the savings onto you.
You can have High Quality, Low price, and fast turnaround. Pick any 2, Never all 3 at the same time.

Offline RoyC

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2017
  • Posts: 1102
  • Karma: 7
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #2 on: 08.07. 2017 21:57 »
Thanks for that Sluggo. My son works in a body shop, I will ask him what glue they've got, maybe windscreen adhesive would do it.
I don't mind if I have to cut it off at a later date.
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
Staffordshire UK

Online Greybeard

  • Jack of all trades; master of none.
  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Feb 2011
  • Posts: 5917
  • Karma: 32

Online Zander

  • A's Best Friend
  • ***
  • Join Date: Jan 2017
  • Posts: 160
  • Karma: 1
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #4 on: 09.07. 2017 06:57 »
As a quickie, and if nothing else is available from your stock of goodies, if you've got the grip off, using yours or some from SWMBO's hairspray (!) fire it up inside the grip and slide it on the sleeve as quickly as possible.  Leave it to dry for a few minutes. This works on bicycle grips, but I don't know if it's strong enough for a twist grip, having never used it for that.  Might be worth a go, but at your own risk!!! 
'59 GF

Offline RoyC

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2017
  • Posts: 1102
  • Karma: 7
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
Staffordshire UK

Online ellis

  • Valued Contributor
  • ****
  • Join Date: Feb 2016
  • Posts: 370
  • Karma: 3
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #6 on: 09.07. 2017 07:38 »
EVOSTIC works for me.   *smile*

ELLIS

Offline Sluggo

  • Serial Hoarder, or Eccentric Collector depending on viewpoint
  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jun 2017
  • Posts: 639
  • Karma: 11
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #7 on: 09.07. 2017 09:47 »
Here is the economy version 3M trim and emblem adhesive... under $5.00 USD,,
See: https://www.amazon.com/3M-03601-Plastic-Emblem-Adhesive/dp/B000CCM3J2

Here is what my tube of adhesive looks like I currently have and been using this type for 20 years. I buy it at a commercial body & paint supply, but looks like its cheaper online (No wonder they closed one of their stores locally)  $8.88 USD
See: https://www.pack-n-tape.com/cart/3M-08061-Plastic-and-Emblem-Adhesive-5-oz-Tube-6-per-case.html?gclid=CjwKEAjwqIfLBRCk6vH_rJq7yD0SJACG18frrXSg1W33tPyGse9UMzqtNEr3ty8kXXvVo6ONKYfg1hoC15fw_wcB

I use it on cars and trucks, but have used it a LOT on British motorcycles. Triumphs with glue on kneepads (1966 - 1970s) If you are careful, you CAN remove the kneepads again or the trim strips on a camaro for example with a sharp razor blade without knicking the paint but the part you glue on will stay for 20-30 years easily.  (Nothing I have glued on with it ever fell off if that means anything, While I have never used it for acft applications, I am adverse to parts falling off by nature so, just a personal quirk...

Here is a picture of some stainless wire and safety wire pliers..  great stuff. Use it for all sorts of things,, (Even used some to manually operate windshield wipers in a old chevy as a passenger on a return trip from Nellis AFB back to Mt Home AFB, My arms got tired so learn to appreciate electric wipers!).  This wire is 20 thou,, but i use 32 thou the most and hardly ever the bigger stuff than that but they make it multiple gauges.
Some people crimp fuel and oil lines onto banjo fittings with it. (Very steam punkish).

As I said, On some model bikes its hard to get good shifter, kicker and foot peg rubber and nothing is as embarrassing as having one fly off in the parking lot while kick starting for a crowd of onlookers and having your prophylactic land in the crowd and have to ask for its return.
 :o Dont make them like they used to  *red*
So, on some machines a nice tight wrap around the peg rubber keeps them in situ.

See: http://www.bikebandit.com/blog/post/how-to-safety-wire-your-motorcycle-and-why-you-should




Remember that any advice received on a free internet forum is generally worth about 1/2 of what you paid for it.
We overcharge every 3rd customer to pass the savings onto you.
You can have High Quality, Low price, and fast turnaround. Pick any 2, Never all 3 at the same time.

Offline RoyC

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2017
  • Posts: 1102
  • Karma: 7
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #8 on: 09.07. 2017 12:52 »
Thanks for all the ideas, got me looking round the garage.
I tried thread lock and it seams to have worked great.
I removed the plastic grip from the twist grip, cleaned them both with carb cleaner, put three or four runs of thread lock on the twist grip and pushed the plastic grip back on using a screwing action to spread the thread lock.
Jobs a gudun.
Roy.  *smile* *wink2*
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
Staffordshire UK

Offline BSA_54A10

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: May 2008
  • Posts: 1983
  • Karma: 32
    • BSA National
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #9 on: 11.07. 2017 08:56 »
Gees, didn't any of you have big sisters ?
Liberally spray the grip with hair spray then push it on quick before it dries out.
Go to the supermarket and get some "Real HE man" stuff with no scent cause SWMBO might get a bit sus when she walks past the garage and smells scent.
Bike Beesa
Trevor

Online Greybeard

  • Jack of all trades; master of none.
  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Feb 2011
  • Posts: 5917
  • Karma: 32
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #10 on: 11.07. 2017 09:21 »
Gees, didn't any of you have big sisters ?
Liberally spray the grip with hair spray then push it on quick before it dries out.
Great tip!  *smile*

Offline jachenbach

  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Feb 2014
  • Posts: 563
  • Karma: 8
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #11 on: 11.07. 2017 14:14 »
Hairspray is the best I've tried. I'm pretty sure it's lacquer based.  I've used the grip glue that often comes with aftermarket grips, and in every case it got soft when hot. Summer temps here are often in the 90's F, sometimes 100+. The glue works fine in cooler weather.

Offline bikerboy

  • Valued Contributor
  • ****
  • Join Date: Dec 2011
  • Posts: 336
  • Karma: 4
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #12 on: 14.07. 2017 21:28 »
Or just whack a bit of silicone on it that does the job

Online Rex

  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Apr 2017
  • Posts: 520
  • Karma: 1
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #13 on: 15.07. 2017 08:57 »
Yep, or even two/three turns of masking tape.

Online Triton Thrasher

  • Scotland
  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Feb 2009
  • Posts: 1482
  • Karma: 20
Re: Twist Grip
« Reply #14 on: 15.07. 2017 09:25 »
Quote
Piece of .032" thou stainless acft safety wire properly twisted and tied (usually double wound around and nice pig tail crimped over) on the end or extreme inside can work,.  I use it sometimes on kicker lever rubbers and foot pegs where the rubber is prone to slide off.

My clutch side handlebar grip is held on like that, with plastic coated gardening wire.  Passers-by think it's some mysterious electrical thing.