Author Topic: Which Oil?  (Read 2320 times)

Offline duTch

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #45 on: 02.08. 2017 20:20 »

 I'm sure priory magnetos will have them, and you'll be sure to get the right ones (and a Forum member);

 https://sites.google.com/site/priorymagnetos/accessories
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Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
Australia

Online Greybeard

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #46 on: 02.08. 2017 22:37 »
If you have one of the aftermarket drainable sum plates you may need slightly longer studs. Can someone advise please?

Online mikeb

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #47 on: 02.08. 2017 23:02 »
Quote
may need lightly longer studs...
yep they are best a bit longer with those thick alloy aftermarket side-draining sump plates. Studs are better than screws to limit wear in the cases.

I think the standard spec is 31-0222  -STUD, 1/4 20-26TPI X 7/8"
I used these: 70-2980  Triumph Rocker Box Stud 1/4" CEI (26tpi) x 20 (BSW) x 1" with some blue loctite into the cases
if you can find studs 1 1/4" length that would be even better. who is it that sells stainless ones in the UK? they have them (http://www.motalia.net - tho mentioning stainless may start another contentious set of debates - in my view stainless best avoided).
I use a narrow 1/4" CEI thread nut with a rocker box nut on top of that to lock it. the extended shank of the rocker box nut makes it easier to fit/remove as there is not much space in there.
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Online RichardL

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #48 on: 02.08. 2017 23:42 »
Well, Molnar Precision makes a lot of stainless steel bits, but I looked at their list and they don't have the studs, so I don't have to steer anyone to them to navigate their way around Nightmare Lady, who runs the hardware division.

Do I sound bitter?  *shh* *pull hair out* *bash* *dribble* It's only been about nine years. I should be over it soon.

Richard L.
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020 (if it's not cancelled and we are free to move about by then). Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Online mikeb

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #49 on: 02.08. 2017 23:53 »
Quote
Do I sound bitter?
nothing wrong with bearing a grudge Richard, elephants excel at it. tho may shorten human life
New Zealand
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Offline Sluggo

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #50 on: 02.08. 2017 23:58 »
Dont know the story of the nightmare lady,,,Is that anything like Jackie @ Unity equipe?
She was a former ladies undergarment saleswoman at Harrods and went to work at Unity, where she was charming but a bit eccentric (Arent we all??) but became (In my opinion) increasingly unstable and irrational and prone to strange behavior.  Unity is gone now.  (Used to order a lot of their stuff) but I dont miss Jackie at all.

Noddy Holder had a song about this....

See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPTk5poAa1c

I don't want to drink my whisky like you do
I don't need to spend my money but still do
Chorus
Don't stop now a c'mon
another drop now c'mon
I want to lot now so c'mon
That's right, that's right
I said Mama but we're all crazy now
I said Mama but we're all crazy now
I said Mama but we're all crazy now
A you told me fool fire water won't hurt me
A you tease me and all my ladies desert me
Chorus
don't want to drink my whisky but still do
I had enough to fill up "H" Hill's left shoe
Chorus
Mama mama mama mama oh yeah...
Remember that any advice received on a free internet forum is generally worth about 1/2 of what you paid for it.
We overcharge every 3rd customer to pass the savings onto you.
You can have High Quality, Low price, and fast turnaround. Pick any 2, Never all 3 at the same time.

Online Greybeard

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #51 on: 03.08. 2017 08:54 »
I have a feeling that rocker cover studs are suitable.

Online Greybeard

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #52 on: 03.08. 2017 08:58 »
This topic needs splitting; Mr moderator?

Offline cyclobutch

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #53 on: 03.08. 2017 13:04 »
... you may need slightly longer studs. Can someone advise please?

Yeah. Barleycorn made mine.

http://www.barleycorn.co.uk/BSA-Goldstar
Various, including ...
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Offline BSA_54A10

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #54 on: 04.08. 2017 09:17 »
Always made my own studs .
Bought a stainless bolt for a boat shop, cut the head off than threaded the shank end.
Never been a problem just so long as you take it slow.
Bike Beesa
Trevor

Offline Sluggo

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #55 on: 04.08. 2017 10:36 »
Modifying a existing bolt either shorter or converting it into a stud is a practical and economical solution especially for obscure applications that no existing or not easily sourced supplier is available.

That being said, as long as one is well aware of the properties of the fastener and what it is to be used for.  Its common for a home workshop to have taps and dies (CUT thread) but few people have the tools to do proper threading for a higher stress application.

FYI,, From : http://www.portlandbolt.com/technical/faqs/rolled-vs-cut-threads-bolts/

What is the difference between a bolt with rolled threads and one with cut threads and does a fastener with a reduced body and rolled threads meet ASTM specifications?
Threads of a mechanical fastener, regardless of whether it is a headed bolt, rod, or bent bolt, can be produced by either cutting or rolling. The differences, misconceptions, advantages, and disadvantages of each method are described below.

Rolled Threads
Roll threading is a process by which steel is extruded to form the threaded portion of a fastener, instead of being removed as in cut threading. In this process, a bolt is manufactured from a reduced diameter round bar. For example, a 1″ diameter bolt is manufactured from .912″ diameter round bar. This “pitch diameter” material is approximately the midpoint between the major diameter (peaks) and minor diameter (valleys) of the threads. The bolt is “rolled” through a set of threading dies which displaces the steel and forms the threads. The end result is a fastener with a full 1″ diameter threaded portion but a reduced body diameter (.912). Roll threading is an extremely efficient process and often results in significant cost savings. Therefore, Portland Bolt will roll threads whenever possible.

Roll Threading Misconceptions

Roll threaded bolts do not meet ASTM specifications.
Technically, any specification with the exception of A325 and A490 structural bolts can be produced with a reduced body and rolled threads.


A bolt with a reduced body will be weaker than a bolt with a full sized body.
The weakest area of any mechanical fastener is the minor diameter of the threads. Since the thread dimensions of a cut thread and rolled thread fastener are identical, there is absolutely no difference in strength. One could actually argue that the work hardening which occurs during the roll threading process may even make the fastener with rolled threads stronger. Additionally, cut threading interrupts the natural grain structure of the round bar whereas roll threading reforms it. One could again argue that cutting into the grain of a round bar when cut threading may produce threads which have less structural integrity than a part which has been roll threaded.

Advantages of Roll Threading

Significantly shorter labor times means lower costs.
Because a roll threaded bolt has a smaller body diameter, it weighs less than its full bodied counterpart. This weight reduction reduces the cost of the steel, galvanizing, heat-treating, plating, freight, and any other costs associated with the fastener that are based on weight.
Cold working makes threads more resistant to damage during handling.
Rolled threads are often smoother due to the burnishing effect of the rolling operation.
Disadvantages of Roll Threading

Portland Bolt is limited to a maximum diameter of 1″ and a maximum thread length of 8″.
The availability of pitch diameter round bar is limited for certain material grades.
150 ksi minimum tensile strength material is too strong for Portland Bolt to roll thread.
A325 and A490 structural bolts cannot be produced with a reduced body diameter.
In rare wood applications where shear strength is the critical requirement, bolts with a full sized body may be required.
Cut Threads
Cut threading is a process by which steel is cut away, or physically removed, from a round bar of steel to form the threads. A 1″ diameter bolt, for example, is produced by cutting threads into a full 1″ diameter body of the bolt.

Advantages of Cut Threading

Few limitations with regard to diameter and thread length.
All specifications can be manufactured with cut threads.
Disadvantages of Cut Threading

Significantly longer labor times means higher costs. (Strength is compromised as well)
Remember that any advice received on a free internet forum is generally worth about 1/2 of what you paid for it.
We overcharge every 3rd customer to pass the savings onto you.
You can have High Quality, Low price, and fast turnaround. Pick any 2, Never all 3 at the same time.

Offline RoyC

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #56 on: 13.08. 2017 21:41 »
Always made my own studs .
Bought a stainless bolt for a boat shop, cut the head off than threaded the shank end.
Never been a problem just so long as you take it slow.
Same here, got some 1/4 whitworth bolts and did the same as you.
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
Staffordshire UK

Offline bikerboy

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #57 on: 15.08. 2017 00:44 »
Firstly I use Morris straight 40 in my A10's winter and summer. As for oil changes the swinging arm version does not need any about every 1000 miles or so it has coated me in oil for one reason or another and gets an automatic oil change  *smile*

Lynn may I suggest you get a parts manual they are cheap enough and quite educational in their own way or draganfly have the schematics on their site. The sump studs are 1/4 whitworth one end and cycle thread the other and are identical to the rocker cover studs. If the bike is anywhere near standard anyway.

Its a good thing to know because you can always make it home with a rocker stud missing when you nick it to replace the one you lost out of your sump  *smile*

Offline wortluck

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Re: Which Oil?
« Reply #58 on: 19.08. 2017 14:32 »
You're all way smarter than me when it comes to this sort of stuff. 

FYI, I use Mannol Safari 20w/50 in everything, and it seems to be fine (went for a 180m trip around North Yorks with a 10 minute stop and it didn't miss a beat).  Don't use a filter, it was rebuilt almost exactly as it came out the factory.  Sludge trap had virtually nothing in it (stood for 10 years but crankcases hadn't been apart for 20+).  Change oil every 1200 or annually and drain/clean bottom of oil tank thoroughly.  Only get a few bits of filings on magnetic sump plug.  I may fit an external filter at some point, but really don't see the need at present. Perhaps if the motor explodes in a ball of flame due to not doing so, it'll definitely change my mind.  Incidentally, if an external filter is fitted, do people extend the oil change intervals?
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