Author Topic: Nuts and bolts  (Read 1068 times)

Offline A10 JWO

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Nuts and bolts
« on: 03.08. 2017 16:07 »
I am doing a nut and bolt restore on my BSA . I appreciate that we can buy allen bolts in sets for the engine. However what is the least painful way of buying all the other nuts and bolts e.g shock  fixing bolts, mudguard fixing bolts, steering yoke bolts and the like. My local shop Leigh Classics ( Essex ) has closed for good. Buying the odd nut and bolt from ebay will cost a fortune. Thank you in anticipation. Colin

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #1 on: 03.08. 2017 18:03 »
...I appreciate that we can buy allen bolts in sets for the engine
Personally I don't like to see allen screws on these engines. They are not original and they encourage casings to be overtightened which can then distort and leak.

Offline RoyC

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #2 on: 03.08. 2017 18:48 »
...I appreciate that we can buy allen bolts in sets for the engine
Personally I don't like to see allen screws on these engines. They are not original and they encourage casings to be overtightened which can then distort and leak.

I didn't realise that, what were the original fixings for the engine covers then ?
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
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Online JulianS

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #3 on: 03.08. 2017 18:59 »
Cheese head screws.

Online Greybeard

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #4 on: 03.08. 2017 19:00 »
...what were the original fixings for the engine covers then ?
Slot head, slightly domed screws. They have a special name that eludes me at the moment.

Ok, in the olden days boy racers, (such as me) would change the screws cos we thought allen heads looked cool and as they can be tightened more they might stop oil pissing out. I've come to realise that tightening with a screwdriver is far kinder on these soft ali covers. Make sure that all high-spots have been removed from both faces, use a gasket and some sealant, (I prefer Blue Hylomar) and just tighten with a screwdriver. My machine is currently oil tight.  *whistle*

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #5 on: 03.08. 2017 19:03 »
They are called Filister head screws

Offline Zander

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #6 on: 03.08. 2017 19:52 »
They are called Filister head screws

 Didn't know that, and never heard of the name.  You learn something every day,
Don't you?  Thanks for the edumacation, gents *wink2*
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Online morris

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #7 on: 03.08. 2017 20:53 »
...I appreciate that we can buy allen bolts in sets for the engine
Personally I don't like to see allen screws on these engines. They are not original and they encourage casings to be overtightened which can then distort and leak.
To avoid overtightening always use an allen key with screwdriver handle .
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Offline kiwipom

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #8 on: 03.08. 2017 22:33 »
hi guys, Zander says:(Didn't know that, and never heard of the name.  You learn something every day,
Don't you)
. Yes it is a sad day when you don`t learn something new, cheers
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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #9 on: 03.08. 2017 22:55 »
 I went a bit beresk for a time and bought stainless everything,  but have since concluded that stainless studs are more or less pointless, and plain or zinc plated with stainless nuts are much more sensible (until I drop a nut and a magnet won't find it  *conf*)
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #10 on: 04.08. 2017 00:38 »
I LOVE stainless bling!   *yeah*

But keep in mind that MOST stainless fasteners are grade 2 (Soft) and not suitable for stressed fasteners or safety.  I find it amazing to see certain parts offered in stainless such as axles.

You can get high grade stainless fasteners and bolts but they tend to be specialized Industrial or aerospace and accordingly expensive.

I Buy certain types in bulk though and use them where not critical.  For example tail lamp assys, fender braces, and certain bracketry are just fine.  We made some tool holders and you can modify the bolts (Say 1/4" bolts) and sand off the markings and polish the heads and looks very attractive.   -OR-  In a lathe you can file down the edges and make your own domed head stainless bolts.  This does not take long at all I can do a box of 100 pretty quick.

I purchase boxs of 100 at a time for 1/4x1/4, 1/4x 1/2, 1/4 x 3/4  1/4 x 1 inch and so on and 5/16th, 3/8ths and others as needed.  Same for washers, AN washers and nuts. 
I LOVE stainless, but only where its suitable
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Online Black Sheep

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #11 on: 04.08. 2017 06:35 »
Using my bikes as everyday transport in all weathers (I'm off to the Western Isles in a few days. It'll rain.) I invariably opt for stainless fasteners when replacements are needed.
New BZP nuts and bolts corrode quicker than old cadmium plated ones and don't look the part either. So if you have to go non-original stainless seems the better option.
Rather looking forward to hammering the A10 through Glencoe. 
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Offline RoyC

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #12 on: 04.08. 2017 08:56 »
I LOVE stainless bling!   *yeah*

But keep in mind that MOST stainless fasteners are grade 2 (Soft) and not suitable for stressed fasteners or safety.  I find it amazing to see certain parts offered in stainless such as axles.

You can get high grade stainless fasteners and bolts but they tend to be specialized Industrial or aerospace and accordingly expensive.

Taken from -  http://stainlessbits.com/link5.html

Myths About Strength
When discussing stainless steel fasteners, it is inevitable that someone is going to remind you that a stainless bolt is not strong enough to use in stress applications. This is only a partial truth, depending on the grade of steel used.

Just as standard steel comes in various strength grades, so does stainless steel. The high strength fasteners offered here at StainlessBits.com are as strong or stronger than grade 8 hardened steel. High strength stainless bolts can be safely used for suspension and brake systems, as engine head bolts and in virtually any application requiring grade 8 steel or the metric equivalent.

In some cases, high strength studs are required for caliper, engine or other stress applications. Due to the many variations among vehicles, exact substitutes are usually unavailable in high strength stainless. StainlessBits.com fabricates special length/thread studs from 17-4 high strength stainless steel rod stock. When included in kits, these items will be specially tagged. Custom studs can also be fabricated for your individual application.
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
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Online JulianS

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #13 on: 04.08. 2017 09:22 »
I have bought many many stainless items for my A10 over the many years of use. Some very good quality and some extremely poor.

Worst example being stainless head bolts, just the 4 ones with exposed heads. They stretched when head torqued and could not be torqued to 30 ft lbs. On removal they had necked. Complete waste of money.

No doubt if they had been made from an appropriate stainless there would not have been an issue but unfortunately many suppliers do not include the grade of material in their advertisements - just check ebay for BSA stainless to see.

So it is  buyer beware with stainless.


Online bsa-bill

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #14 on: 04.08. 2017 09:24 »
Quote
Filister head screws

Note NOT the same as "Cheese head" which I have seen sold for timing case
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
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