Author Topic: Nuts and bolts  (Read 1024 times)

Offline Greybeard

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #15 on: 04.08. 2017 09:26 »

Rather looking forward to hammering the A10 through Glencoe
Lucky bugga!

Offline Tomcat

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #16 on: 04.08. 2017 09:28 »
I am doing a nut and bolt restore on my BSA . I appreciate that we can buy allen bolts in sets for the engine. However what is the least painful way of buying all the other nuts and bolts e.g shock  fixing bolts, mudguard fixing bolts, steering yoke bolts and the like. My local shop Leigh Classics ( Essex ) has closed for good. Buying the odd nut and bolt from ebay will cost a fortune. Thank you in anticipation. Colin
[/quot



We have Classic Fasteners Down Under for bulk packs of BSCY fasteners, must be someone in the UK?
I keep a basic kit of BSCY nuts and short bolts, (washers can be bought at the local discount hardware). When I rebuilt the Super Rocket, I worked at one area at a time and as I ordered the parts for that area ordered the fasteners. 1st port of call was always Priory Magnetos.
'48 A7 '59 SR '74 850 Commando TDM900

Offline bsa-bill

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #17 on: 04.08. 2017 09:32 »
Quote
Rather looking forward to hammering the A10 through Glencoe

Large land owners used to enclose parts of their estates in walls, got one or two around here, it's very difficult  to run alongside a walled section and not check that the Campbell's are working properly *smile*
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Offline Sluggo

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #18 on: 04.08. 2017 10:26 »

Taken from -  http://stainlessbits.com/link5.html

Myths About Strength
When discussing stainless steel fasteners, it is inevitable that someone is going to remind you that a stainless bolt is not strong enough to use in stress applications. This is only a partial truth, depending on the grade of steel used.

Just as standard steel comes in various strength grades, so does stainless steel. The high strength fasteners offered here at StainlessBits.com are as strong or stronger than grade 8 hardened steel. High strength stainless bolts can be safely used for suspension and brake systems, as engine head bolts and in virtually any application requiring grade 8 steel or the metric equivalent.

In some cases, high strength studs are required for caliper, engine or other stress applications. Due to the many variations among vehicles, exact substitutes are usually unavailable in high strength stainless. StainlessBits.com fabricates special length/thread studs from 17-4 high strength stainless steel rod stock. When included in kits, these items will be specially tagged. Custom studs can also be fabricated for your individual application.
[/quote]

That is very true, but do these companies sell their fasteners with certs?   Valid claims of such materials come with manuf. certifications.  My wife is a production and logistics manager with a manufacturer locally.  Bar stock comes with certs, records are kept of heat treat or annealing as well as conditioning such as plating. (parkerizing,Chrome,  Zinc, cad,Anodizing, gold etc)
She works with a product buyer who spends all their time making sure the materials coming into the shop are on time for each job as well as the proper materials.
Customers range from sporting goods (Including mountain climbing gear, not the place to wonder about material quality) to firearms and weapons, to brake manufacturers for trucks and cars,.

You can find many such fasteners with specific markings on them that SHOULD indicate their grading and ratings but you cannot trust such markings as there is a lot of bogus materials out there.   When Aerospace jobs come in, the raw materials are certed, the steps follow ISO and other international stds (All the stds out there would require hours of education).

Most hardware stores and bulk fasteners suppliers are all grade 2.  Be happy to show anyone with a rockwell tester how you verify the grading..  (I am certified in aerospace NDT=Non Destructive testing)  I also worked as an Inspector and various positions at a Aerospace manufacturer and our customers were GE, Pratt & Whitney, Rolls Royce Aerospace, FIAT Aerospace, SNECMA and Boeing, and a variety of military defense contractors.

For a real education for the lay person, Read this document and use this as a reference for your hardware needs.  (I know some of the regional FASTENAL reps and good company, good products)

See: https://www.fastenal.com/content/documents/FastenalTechnicalReferenceGuide.pdf

For the home workshop and or aspiring gearhead, a indispensible tool is this reference book, My 2 copies are much older editions but I keep this in my flight line tool box and in the workshop.
Helicopter and flightline hand signals for marshalling acft would be outside the scope of most peoples needs, but the hardware guide, proper torque techniques and proper application of fittings alone makes this book invaluable for anyone.  Its literally a education and technical godsend in one book.  No mechanic should be without one.

See:  https://www.amazon.com/Aviation-Mechanic-Handbook-Standard/dp/1560278986

Used copies under $10 and $15 new. Such a deal!  Best money you can spend I promise.
Remember that any advice received on a free internet forum is generally worth about 1/2 of what you paid for it.
We overcharge every 3rd customer to pass the savings onto you.
You can have High Quality, Low price, and fast turnaround. Pick any 2, Never all 3 at the same time.

Online coater87

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #19 on: 04.08. 2017 14:25 »
 Sluggo,

 These are 60-70 year old motorcycles with barely enough ass to pull themselves off slippery rocks.

 I dont know about anyone else, but I personally dont need certifications of materials or aircraft grade bolts to hold the toolbox on.

 Wood screws were what was holding most of the engine covers on before- and that worked. I doubt those wood screws came with "certs"
  from the local hardware store. *smile*

 Lee
Central Wisconsin in the U.S.

Online coater87

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #20 on: 04.08. 2017 14:29 »
Quote
Filister head screws

Note NOT the same as "Cheese head" which I have seen sold for timing case

 I had trouble finding fillister head screws, except for the 5/16 ones. All my 1/4 inch are cheese heads.

 I had trouble believing how hard it was to find correct case screws. *conf*

 Lee
Central Wisconsin in the U.S.

Offline Sluggo

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #21 on: 04.08. 2017 19:04 »
Quote "I dont know about anyone else, but I personally dont need certifications of materials or aircraft grade bolts to hold the toolbox on."

Correct!  I made that point that the majority of fasteners in stainless at most suppliers and hardware stores are grade 2 and adequate for many uses. RoyC posted some material from a website claiming their fasterners were not the garden variety grade 2 material.  I was making the point however that *IF* a company wanted to state that, there IS a procedure commonly understood in the world of manufacturing to back that up.
Does not mean we all need Inconel or 17-4 fasteners, but you should be aware of the difference.  Many of the castings we made for some of our aerospace customers were 17-4 and some proprietary blends but that material is ALSO very expensive.  Totally overkill for your tool box.  (I Had a collection of hinges that were designed for the Space station in 17-4, these were scrap but they were lovely when polished and I used them on some custom made wooden cabinetry at our old house)
Nobody needs to over think this, but should be aware of the details of hardware out there today. But dont trust a claimed rating or cert unless you can verify.  There literally is a tidal wave of counterfeit materials out there.
That was the point.
Heck, even the suppliers for old British motorcycles & cars are having some real problems with counterfeit materials and its amazing to me anyone bothers faking obscure brands parts.
Bicycle companies are not immune, NGK Spark plugs has been having problems and even reputable dealers have trouble knowing the difference.

 
Remember that any advice received on a free internet forum is generally worth about 1/2 of what you paid for it.
We overcharge every 3rd customer to pass the savings onto you.
You can have High Quality, Low price, and fast turnaround. Pick any 2, Never all 3 at the same time.

Online RichardL

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #22 on: 16.07. 2018 13:27 »
Cheese head screws.

I'm here on "Nuts and Bolts" for a different reason, but, while I'm here:

Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2017 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDE on September 30, 2018. Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Online RichardL

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #23 on: 16.07. 2018 13:37 »
Looking at engine-to-frame stud/bolt kits. A couple of questions:

1. Is there a consensus (or individual opinion) regarding studs vs. bolts? I'm inclined to go all studs for the '57 A7 for originality (not a total necessity, but why not). I recognize the convenience of bolts, but is there any other functional benefit I might be missing?

2. Any recommendations (or warnings) for sourcing a kit? Ebay seems to be the go-to for selection and price. I have had successful dealings with some of the sellers carying the kits.

Richard L.
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2017 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDE on September 30, 2018. Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Online Rex

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #24 on: 16.07. 2018 15:03 »
Stainless fastenings are OK for the run-of-the-mill items, but for specialised or highly stressed components I think I'd rather trust the metallurgists at BSA than some Taiwan sweat shop owners' take on what they ought to be.

Online duTch

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #25 on: 16.07. 2018 15:19 »
 I would class a 'stud' as double ended with a coarse thread that screws into a frame or casting-whatever and a finer (but not necessarily so) thread the other end to be used with a nut on the outside for final and effective tightening, where a 'through-bolt, (which may have a better name'), has same threads either end, which I suggest would be better in some situations where it gives the option of undoing either end (sure as though, the one you want to loosen will stay tight *conf*).
 **Above 'through-bolts' and fine stud threads in BSC .

 I can't offer a supplier, as I bought from a now defunct entity (bought out by a well known and not so popular supplier), a 'kit'  that I was fairly disappointed with for various reasons (slightly wrong lengths for my needs), but may work for you.

 As I've already mentioned, stainless studs or through-bolts  are pointless, better with zinc or nickle plated and stainless nuts.

  Hope that's some help; I think Motalia is a go-to place??

Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
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Offline RogerSB

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #26 on: 16.07. 2018 16:00 »
BSA A10 stainless fastenings - Barleycorn Engineering in Norfolk:-

http://www.barleycorn.co.uk/index.php?route=common/home

Below is an extract from an invoice from last year giving an idea of prices.

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Offline Angus

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #27 on: 16.07. 2018 17:37 »
I second the recommendation for barleycorn. I went to see him to pickup my bits (just up the road) and he was very helpful and friendly, even fitter the form oil seals to the holders for me.
1961 A7 since 1976
1960 A10 Gold Flash Super Profile Bike
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Online coater87

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #28 on: 16.07. 2018 21:03 »
 I have very few fasteners on the bike that are not from Barleycorn.

 The only ones I had any problem with at all was the stainless badge screws. The heads were shaped differently than the badge recess. Because everything else from Barleycorn was very good, I am going to say the badges were made wrong.

 Lee
Central Wisconsin in the U.S.

Online muskrat

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Re: Nuts and bolts
« Reply #29 on: 16.07. 2018 21:12 »
I got the cyl base studs & nuts, crank case studs & nuts and engine & gearbox bolts/studs & nuts in SS from Motalia. I think the only prob was one or two studs were a little short.
Cheers
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