Author Topic: Tool Box Contents  (Read 1002 times)

Offline East_Coast_BSA

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #15 on: 31.08. 2017 19:02 »
Many many years ago on my 17th birthday (as it happens) I set out on my A10 with sidecar to go from London to the Lake District.

I carried a comprehensive toolbox, sockets, spanners the whole works. I even took spare bolts and a gasket set. I blew a head gasket, my chain snapped and I ended up using virtually every tool and spare part I had taken.

Since then I decided to carry nothing whatsoever and that has worked for me. The 7 0r 8 times things have gone wrong for me (I mean actually stopping me continuing) I have either been within half a mile of home bar once and I had to call somebody out. That was a mag failure so no amount of tools would have helped anyway. At my age I am ar to old for roadside repairs anyway.


My thoughts exactly.  I've noticed that some vehicles just have "Good Karma".  I had a truck that broke down once, lost the electronic fuel pump while still in my garage.  Never had a problem otherwise.  The BSA is the same thing (maybe because it's a family heirloom).  I had a valve stem tear out of the rear tube and the tire went flat instantly (at 40 mph).  The tire rolled over on one side and I kept the bike upright until it coasted to a stop....at the top of my driveway.  I got off the bike and pushed it into my garage.  Not only did I reuse the tire (because there wasn't a single mark on the sidewall), but the tire never let the rim even touch the pavement.  I replaced the tube and everything was good.  Not a scratch anywhere.  This is a "Good Karma" vehicle.  I'm confident it's not going to leave me stranded anywhere.

Offline bikerboy

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #16 on: 31.08. 2017 23:09 »
Nah as long as I wear safety shoes and a hi viz jacket I will be fine  *smile*

Online KiwiGF

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #17 on: 01.09. 2017 02:10 »
I expect some negative karma *fight* but maybe always ride with a mate on a japanese bike with a pillion seat  *shh*

Or always hitch up the car with a trailer before you head out, so "mission control" can come rescue you  *doh*
New Zealand

1956 A10 Golden Flash (1st finished project)

1949 B31 rigid “400cc hot rod” (2nd finished project, + favourite bike)

GL1800 Goldwing, well, the wife likes it

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1952 Armstrong Siddeley Whitley for rainy days (with wife)

Online muskrat

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #18 on: 01.09. 2017 22:11 »
A small modest tool kit and a MOBILE PHONE.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
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Online Peter in Aus

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #19 on: 02.09. 2017 04:04 »
A small modest tool kit and a MOBILE PHONE.
Cheers
+ 1 here *good3*

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58 A10  SA

Online Black Sheep

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #20 on: 02.09. 2017 06:48 »
Finding myself miles from phone coverage on a regular basis, stuff to fix a puncture, a hat (essential for hot sun or heavy rain) a bottle of water and something to eat. Even in mobile phone coverage, it can be a long wait for recovery. 
2 twins, 2 singles, lots of sheep

Offline duTch

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #21 on: 02.09. 2017 10:14 »
 
 
Quote
Not to forget spare  throttle,  clutch and brake cables- run in situ/parallel with the ones in use,  and/¿or are"on cable ends(nipples).

 ^^ I've come across a few guys who do this- maybe it's a Gutzzi thang...

 I have to add that I somehow conveniently forgot three occasions THIS year that I had to do pick-up retrievals (X3).

 1> When I was at the younstas house and a thunderstorm cam over quicker than I expected, the Racket started first kick as usual, but I only made it a mile down the road and it conked out (still raining-dark ), pushed it up and down a  hill for a bit and it almost ran, but after a bit decided to cab it 6 K's back to the Low Chaparral (still raining)...took the van back for an easy retrieve...took two weeks to dry out, which imay have contributed to......>>
2> Fired up ok to head to a job, then a bit rough on one- only a few K's, but conked out at the last corner, rolled into the job, but end of day same as above, so called the other youngsta who this time was available to pick me up--then van retieval. (that time was the Magneto, so no tools would've helped)

3> Not technically a 'breakdown', but when a concrete truck drives over something it kinda breaks-down *eek*....cabbed it back and did a Van-duTch retrieval, really only a outta-shape wheel stopped me from riding......

  My earliest big journey breakdown trip was when 'I was only nineteen', I decided to go see my mate in Sydney,( about 640 miles away at the time)... there was a girl involved so time was of the essence. That was the trip where my (Road Rocket) 6 spring clutch jumped ship from the shaft at about 2am at the best part of the trip on the Burringbar Range (Northern NSW)...hitched a ride to Burringbar Village at daylight, pulled it apart (allen key for chaincase screws, mainshaft-nut tool, ?)- forgot to put the circlip on and didn't make it far before it spat...hitched a ride on and RD400 back and found circlip- on the road again.
  A few miles down the road, the madguard started flapping in the breeze, pulled up for fuel in Ballina and found some means to tie that on and swore that if anything else went awry it's hometime, but made it the next four hundred miles or so to Syddo, and the 640miles home no worries (except for running out of oil and money at the same time) did the 640 Miles in about 14,1/2 hours (including hunting down a wrecker for secondhand oil *smile*) I guess I had the right tools for the trip- and that was my 20th lap of the sunDay

 Just remembered an extra thing to carry- was at a time of fuel strikes and shortages, so took a gallon (1 gallon BP oil tin) with me, and didn't need it until I was less than 20 K's from 'home' .....happy days

  Have to mention that when I fuelled up in Taree at around ten or so PM there was a carload of 'ooligans being dicks as I pulled out, and a few K's down the track had lights screaming up behind, so pulled over up a track- lights off until they were way past, but then a few more k's down the road, there was a similar looking car upside down in the middle of a bridge looking not user friendly....

 aah sorry that a bit astray, but tools yea can carry all you like, but sone c****s law says you may not have the one you need (that's why travellin' light is the only way to fly- JJ Cale)


Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
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Online Greybeard

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #22 on: 02.09. 2017 11:19 »
duTch, love that post!

Online Angus

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #23 on: 02.09. 2017 12:25 »
Have the same set in all three bikes, an adjustable spanner, which can also act on the hex topped spark plug socket a multi tool screw driver with lots of bits and a couple of fuses. Always carry a simplish Swiss army knife to get into tool box and for cutting. Never used on my bikes but helped others.

I too loved duTch's post, it reminded me of sitting under a flyover bridge near Slough under the M4 on route to Cornwall. It was throwing it down and the flaming Honda 500/4 would not run in that much rain. So sat it out, patience is a good tool to have in the box  *smile*
1961 A7 since 1976
1960 A10 Gold Flash Super Profile Bike
1958 Matchless G80 Project
1952 Norton Model 7 Plunger
1950 T100

Online Greybeard

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #24 on: 02.09. 2017 13:27 »
It was throwing it down and the flaming Honda 500/4 would not run in that much rain.
I once had a job as a courier riding a Honda 500 4. I can testify to the darned thing objecting to the rain!

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #25 on: 02.09. 2017 21:51 »
My one and only mechanical breakdown was a slight nip up 100Km into a 200Km ride. Stopped on the side of the road for 20 minutes till she cooled. About 30 1%ers stopped to help (Fourth Reich) but she fired up 1st kick. Probably nerves. Completed the trip at a reduced pace.
Most (not many) of my road breakdowns have been electrickal (Boyer ign). Two snapped dyno belts and a fried reg. At a very wet BSA National st Tamworth the left plug cap rubber was missing so in a straight line or in right handers she was running on one but in left handers the dead pot would come to life  *eek*. Gaffer tape to the rescue. Fixed the reg with a DVRII and carry a spare belt. Tools = allen key, spark plug & spanner, flat & phillips screwdrivers, 1/4 5/16 3/8 ring/openend spanners, shifting spanner, a few cable ties and gaffer tape.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7

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Re: Tool Box Contents
« Reply #26 on: 03.09. 2017 06:57 »
Gees Musky, I don't remember you being at the Surfers Paradise National.
Brian had to remove his maggy then after draining it out stand in the dunney for 1/2 hour with it under the hand dryer to dry it out.
I ended up with a primary & gearbox full of water hence the break down on the first run.
My kit sounds much like yours with a plug or two tossed in for good measure.

However I can never remember the A 10 not getting me at least to within pushing distance of home, even if it meant putting 60 psi in the tyre and riding like the clappers till it went down.
I can remember riding from Amaroo back to Sans Souci with the left rod bent & jambed on the journal, slowly smashing up the spiggot and on the bridge finally breaking the entire barrel off the flange bar one stud, but it was still running although I coasted to the bottom of the bridge and pushed it the last mile.
No other alternative, I was the only person at home with a license and the A 10 was the only vehicle.
Just because they have gone from daily transport to weekend toys does not mean they have become any less robust
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Trevor