Author Topic: Cost of spraying a tank.  (Read 1953 times)

Online groily

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #15 on: 22.10. 2017 15:59 »
Makes me think a bit, this discussion.

Should there be a section in the Wants/For Sale area specially for Barterers? Those who need something and have something to exchange, be it parts, skills or services, or even things like a whole Pig ready for the freezer - which, yes, was a good one for me a few years back in exchange for an engine assembly job.
I've exchanged all sorts for all sorts without money sullying the equation, and bikes and bits haven't always come into it. A surplus trailer for replacement oxy-acetylene kit, a tank job from a top man for some hard-to-find electrical stuff, all sorts of parts swaps, etc etc.

Just thinking on the keyboard as it were, but with the cost of things these days, there has to be scope for imaginative workarounds when willing people can be introduced. The problem is How and Where.
What would be wrong with a small ad saying "Need Tank Job, Spares or XYZ Skills or Whatever Available in Exchange - Try Me?"

Just saying  . . .
Bill

Offline jachenbach

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #16 on: 22.10. 2017 19:18 »
Groily, that's a great idea. Barter cuts the tax man out of the equation. A penny saved is at least one and a half pennies earned.

Online bsa-bill

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #17 on: 22.10. 2017 19:29 »
Bit of good lateral thinking there Groily
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Offline nimrod650

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #18 on: 22.10. 2017 20:52 »
I think this shows that our precious bikes are fast becoming showpieces to be cosseted. I am certainly in a small minority regarding them as everyday transport...
...it brings up the fundamental question. What are these bikes really for?
I must say, your bike looks very good; very practical for everyday use.

I could not use my bike for everyday use and don't need to. Even if I had a dual seat my dearly beloved Janet would not get on the back any more. In the car I still average 10k miles a year, usually with Janet beside me.
I use my machine to go on classic bike runs with the VMCC and camping weekends with the BSAOC. I really want to preserve the machine in the good condition that I restored her to a few years ago and for as long as I can still ride it. I will not be riding on salted roads this winter. So, cossetted? Guilty as charged.
agree valspar black wasn't affected by petrol like others

Online Black Sheep

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #19 on: 22.10. 2017 21:41 »
Valspar is good. Back to the barter... I have just had my Velocette gearbox and clutch expertly rebuilt with hard to get parts and the leaking tank welded up in exchange for a spare Norton gearbox. You can argue whether or not this was a fair exchange but I didn't need the Norton gearbox but I really needed expert help with the Velo. We remain good friends and are both happy with the exchange.
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Online BSA_54A10

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #20 on: 22.10. 2017 23:55 »
If you own a compressor, you can buy a good quality spray gun or two, painting supplies, various sandpapers, etc. and probably have money left over. Cost of paint has gone up considerably over the years, but most of the really high prices are for paints and colors that didn't exist when these bikes were built. Acrylic enamel or lacquer starts (in the USA) at around $100/gallon and goes up depending on tint, metalflake, etc. Lacquer is extremely easy to learn to spray and mistakes are very easy to correct. With patience and a bit of practice, you can get the same results with a spray can. A can loaded with automotive enamel, reducer, hardener and ready to spray costs about $25 here in Boise.

Yep agree 100% and an old moving carton makes an excellent spray booth / drying chamber to prevent dust on the slower drying enamels.
Done lots of bits like that with spray cans before I got the compressor.
Seen lots of concours winners that were painted with rattle cans.
If you are thinking of buying a gun, go to a pro shop and buy a low pressure one they really make painting a bike a breeze and also get an in line water & oil trap fit it with about 2' of hose so it is that far away from your gun to keep the air clean
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Trevor

Offline Joolstacho

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #21 on: 22.10. 2017 23:59 »
Just has a quote to spray my 4 gallon tank which is currently in bare metal. one colour, no stripes- £400 seems excessive ? or am I behind the times.

In the good ol' days a spraypainter (like other tradies) would run a daggy old Ford Popular and take the wife and snotty kids to Butlins, Clacton-on-sea for a weeks annual holidays.
Nowadays they have to finance the latest twin cab V8 SUV and decide whether to go to the Luxury Holiday Home and give the speedboat a run, or fly out to the Algarve for a few weeks.

(For 400 quid I'd buy a compressor, really good spraygun, all the 2k paint I need and learn to DIY. And I'd have a fair wad left over!)

Online bsa-bill

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #22 on: 23.10. 2017 09:24 »
Quote
(For 400 quid I'd buy a compressor, really good spraygun, all the 2k paint I need and learn to DIY. And I'd have a fair wad left over!)

Agreed
I have an Aldi compressor and tools. I did upgrade the spray gun (only slightly - Sealey), my local spray shop got me paint and thinners and gave me lots of good advise, I did oil tank, toolbox and both mudguards and had paint left over, every one who has seen the bike compliments the finish.
Fuel tank had  already been sprayed when chromed, shop matched the colour.
Paint shops use water based paint these days so it a bind to them to spray cellulose, so their more than happy to give you the hekp and advice to do the job your self, lining is not too difficult with stick on lines that do last and bend around corners 
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Offline Sluggo

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #23 on: 23.10. 2017 20:52 »
I started with the autobody courses and learning to spray paint and body work in the late 1970s as a wee lad because there was no way I could afford to pay someone else.  I have never paid anyone to paint anything for me except once a insurance job on the wifes pickup fender bender. (And had to fix some of the other shops work as a result)

Much has changed from the old days,  Lacquers and the old catalyzed enamels much of you are familiar with are long gone in the US and actually illegal to sell.  Modern enamels, and Polyurethanes are now the norm and went "High Solids" a long time ago.  (Very little solvents and minimizing overspray. Old system was about 20% of the product ended up on the sheetmetal the rest was vapor and overspray, High solids are much more efficient)

I have done some contract jobs for several shops and businesses.
(Cars-motorcycles and industrial equipment and back in the 1980s-90s used to do some acft)
But mostly I was doing my own shop work for jobs I took on for others as either full or partial restos on customer vehicles or vehicles I built to sell. 

My fav colors are a dark blue with cream white accents, or several shades of what I call "Resale red"  and varies from a very dark Brandywine candy to a regular candy apple red and usually offset with Alaskan white accents or scallops and often gold pinstripping. My favorite color products are House of KOLOR and have taken classes from the grand master Jon Kosmoski
See: http://www.houseofkolor.com/homepage/

I have done a lot of BSAs and the Candy reds lend themselves quite well to mid sixties BSA unit twins and singles, and did a few in a solid guards red (Spitfires).   I dont do many cars anymore but did the FILs MGB 2 years back and he wants to do his MG TD this winter so, I wanted to do it in British Racing Green but he is strongly opposed.  We have the wifes 1969 Chevelle coming up next year sometime and again a hot debate is ensuing about color choice.  We agreed on the base color but differ on the rally stripes and I am of the opinion that one should allow the artist to choose,. She does not agree.

If you like, I have multiple projects to be painted this winter and would be happy to post a tutorial and photo series on the process.  Ill even make it BSA centric although some of them are unit models, But I want to get the paint done on my 51 A10 project this winter so we can highlight that one as well.
I tend to do most motorcycle paint jobs in batches as from a time/labor standpoint it is more efficient so typically its 4 bikes at a time + or -.  But it costs the same for heat, cleaning, prep, and only marginally more for tape and masking, materials, sanding so, Taylors "Economy of motion" applies.

Hammerite is a bad bad, foul word to me.  What that means here in the US is a rubbery nasty rattle can paint that I have strong feelings about.  I had a few that DPOs had sprayed and it is highly unpleasant to deal with.  Usually if metal parts then chuck them in a chemical bath and remove the shit.  But I have a 68 BSA 441 Roadster here that the DPO had painted the frame, fiberglass body work and even the chrome bits with Silver Hammerite as well as some Deer horns and named the bike "Bucky"  I am De-Sodomizing it presently. 

While rattle cans have their place, I have no use for it on a painting basis for vehicles,  It fades badly in even moderate sunlight and the mere suggestion of petrol-gas-oil or brake fluid it dissolves into a gooey mess.  Its just a exercise in disappointment.
Remember that any advice received on a free internet forum is generally worth about 1/2 of what you paid for it.
We overcharge every 3rd customer to pass the savings onto you.
You can have High Quality, Low price, and fast turnaround. Pick any 2, Never all 3 at the same time.

Online Greybeard

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #24 on: 24.10. 2017 10:26 »
I've never had good results with rattle cans. The paint doesn't seem to be very tough.

Offline A10 JWO

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #25 on: 24.10. 2017 16:00 »
It is a shame that the lovely tanks on ebay from India are not for sale over here. £200 brand new. This country is so greedy. Thanks for all replies on this thread.

Online Greybeard

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #26 on: 24.10. 2017 17:35 »
It is a shame that the lovely tanks on ebay from India are not for sale over here. £200 brand new. This country is so greedy. Thanks for all replies on this thread.
Eh? Your signature has a union flag so I presume you are in the UK. Are Indian made tanks not available in the UK?

Online Angus

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #27 on: 24.10. 2017 18:55 »
I went to Normus Newark on Sunday (not really Normus prefer Kempton park). Anyway Kidderminster Motorcycle were there with a new BSA 10 tank ready chromed, no paint. It was probably from India but at least you have a UK dealer to talk to about any problems. From memory £299, a bit expensive for a spare but almost tempting.
 
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Offline Scott and Jay

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #28 on: 24.10. 2017 22:13 »
I too went the lacquer way, which you can still get easily in NZ, in spray cans.It needs no breathing apparatus. I followed the techniques in a couple of articles you can google - about "Harley painting for the under-skilled and under-funded". I followed the preparation advice in these too. It allowed me to restore all my panel work myself. The good filler I used seems to have stayed put. The finish shines up nicely and has lasted.

Online Black Sheep

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Re: Cost of spraying a tank.
« Reply #29 on: 24.10. 2017 22:25 »
It would be wonderful to have paintwork (and mechanics) done by someone of Sluggo's expertise. The downside would be that I would be rather reluctant to actually use the bike for fear of any hint of damage. A cheap, easily fixed finish does mean that I'm not paranoid about using and abusing the bikes.
I got a tank back this afternoon after having a leaking seam brazed. I've got to use the bike on Saturday so the brazed bit got a quick spray with Hammerite Smooth just to keep corrosion at bay. I'll do something a bit better over the winter. Probably. 
2 twins, 2 singles, lots of sheep