Author Topic: dynamo belt drive - to grease or not to grease  (Read 1572 times)

Offline Sluggo

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Re: dynamo belt drive - to grease or not to grease
« Reply #30 on: 01.11. 2017 19:37 »
Thank you for the response and that is great information.  (Thumbs up!).  The price of your kits looks reasonable and I am well aware of the challenges of manufacturing and dealing with the public as a vendor so let me say your efforts are appreciated.
Few people have any idea how difficult it is to manage a small niche business or create a viable product but are quick to criticize or offer opinions without real knowledge.
So I am sure you dont hear it nearly enough, but thank you for your services.   *smile*  I am not yet at purchasing parts stage for my 2 A10s I am keeping but I will most certainly be a customer soon.


On another note, many years ago I was unsatisfied with the generators on early bikes and started researching and working on alternatives as I have some preunit triumphs as well.  I bought a few tractor and ATV alternators and was looking at making a small compact alternator for retrofit,  ALTON came out with theirs.  I had a lot of other irons in the fire so dropped the endeavor.  I still feel the ALTON kit can be improved on from a price standpoint as well as output, but life changes came along and its no longer a priority for me.   One note though is that in testing it is amazing how much load a generator or alternator can generate thru a belt, or gear.  It is NOT an insignifant amount.  I know Bill Getty pretty well at JRC Engineering and in discussion talked about the issues of shredded gear teeth for replacements for maggies
so dont overlook what it takes to make something that is durable.

Lastly,,, WD40.  I saw that mentioned as a lube.  Pet peeve of mine.  I have a couple cans on hand all the time and it has its uses.  But its a misunderstood product and at this point people have it embedded into their psyche its a lube.  It is not.  Its a actually very poor choice as a lube. It flashes off and evaporates easily.

WD-40 stands for "Water displacement and the 40th attempt at a formula of a mixture of a variety of chemicals.  It was developed in the US Space & missle program for cleaning and drying out electrical connectors from salt water, morning dew and condensation.

Dont believe me?? Read the wiki.
See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40

** Someones significantly edited the wiki page from last time I read it.  But it hits most of the marks.

For a pentatrating oil try Kroil, But I like "PB Blaster" and for a wet lubricant I use "Triflow" but for dry lubes I have a variety of sprayable dry film moly based lubes that work well.
Remember that any advice received on a free internet forum is generally worth about 1/2 of what you paid for it.
We overcharge every 3rd customer to pass the savings onto you.
You can have High Quality, Low price, and fast turnaround. Pick any 2, Never all 3 at the same time.

Offline RogerSB

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Re: dynamo belt drive - to grease or not to grease
« Reply #31 on: 01.11. 2017 20:33 »
I'm pleased to see that Mike Hutchings has come in on this thread to add his expertise.  During the night, and thinking about things, I thought tomorrow before I get involved in the garage I should email him and let him know about this thread but I've been thrutching and heaving on my bike all day and forgot to do it.


Today was wheels off day and fitted new primary chain, rear chain, clutch springs, rear wheel adjusters, etc . . . and as usual one thing led to another and more came off than planned!


Tomorrow it's 'decision time' for me and reading all that's been said on here I've 'almost' made up my mind to leave the dynamo belt dry. I bought this GF early in the year and the previous owner told me that the belt drive was fitted before he got the bike so I don't know how long it's been on there or for how many miles. It looks to be in good nick - so running it dry doesn't seem to have done it harm. Although it goes against the grain to not adhear to the supplier's recommendation.


I had no idea when I asked this question that it would be such a technical subject - but many thanks to all.






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Offline RogerSB

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Re: dynamo belt drive - to grease or not to grease
« Reply #32 on: 01.11. 2017 21:02 »

 another thing to consider is that I believe later versions of one or some are in a 15mm wide version, as opposed to the 10mm wide ones, which makes sense to me.

 Actually, it really wouldn't be so hard to knock up whatever one chooses if the means are available (if Shirley allows it *conf* )


duTch, you've guessed who's boss then!

1960 Golden Flash

Offline mikeb

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Re: dynamo belt drive - to grease or not to grease
« Reply #33 on: 01.11. 2017 21:31 »
Quote
I had no idea when I asked this question that it would be such a technical subject
when this panel of experts is still in debate then it probably doesn't matter much.

on the other hand Mike H's comments about belt tension are important. i hadn't thought about the alu pulley expansion affecting the diameter that much and thereby tension. that's the one to get right.
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Online muskrat

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Re: dynamo belt drive - to grease or not to grease
« Reply #34 on: 03.11. 2017 20:24 »
G'day all.
I've have belts (10mm) on both mine for about 10 years. At first I had a few belts let go, probably my fault for over tensioning. Once the correct tension was found the belts rubbed the raised boss for the inner cover (the boss had been gouged by a loose chain) . I ground the boss off and use a countersunk screw. The cafe still chewed another belt due to excess heat (my high pipe runs very close to the timing cover). I then applied grease liberally to the compartment and haven't had a problem since.
Cheers
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