Author Topic: Clutch adjusting  (Read 2856 times)

Offline BSA_54A10

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: May 2008
  • Posts: 2008
  • Karma: 32
    • BSA National
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #60 on: 04.12. 2017 14:59 »
The photo makes it all clear now, I can see that the centre cage is just held by the splines and it's just a matter of working it loose. Thanks a lot for that.*smiley4*
There is nothing holding the drum on the clutch center.
One side of the bearing is flat ( drum side ) while the inner race has groves for the balls to run in.
Usually you can pull the drum off, then the bearing thus leaving nothing on the main shaft other than the center & the backing plate.

Next, the PULLER is not a PULLER and if u use it as a PULLER you will simply strip the threads off.
The PULLER is a PRELOADER so you preload the center then give it a sharp whack and usually it pops off.
However I have found that if you tighten the PULLER with a rattle gun, the jerky motion will oft break the taper and the center will pop straight off.
If you tighten the puller with a big long spannar generally it strips the thread.
Bike Beesa
Trevor

Offline RoyC

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2017
  • Posts: 1102
  • Karma: 7
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #61 on: 04.12. 2017 15:38 »
Got everything off and am waiting for the "puller". (Appreciate the tip about whacking the puller bolt).
I have managed to get all of the bolts out that are holding the primary back plate on, including the sliding plate bolts, but the sliding plate just spins, I assume that it is held in place by the centre.
Roy.
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
Staffordshire UK

Offline a101960

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2007
  • Posts: 1040
  • Karma: 12
  • BSA RGS BSA C12
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #62 on: 04.12. 2017 17:48 »
Quote
(Appreciate the tip about whacking the puller bolt).
The instructions that accompanied mine when I bought said that the correct usage was, that once the extractor was tightened up, you should hit it with a hammer and then tighten up again by one quarter of a turn, and then again use the hammer. This cycle should be repeated until the clutch centre is free. As has been said do not attempt to use it as a puller the threads will strip if you use the tool in this way. Also if it is the MCA tool that you have purchased I would most strongly advise that you examine the thread very closely before you attempt to use it. I had to do quite a lot of cleaning up to remove debris from the thread. Maybe I was just unfortunate, but do check that out.

Offline RoyC

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2017
  • Posts: 1102
  • Karma: 7
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #63 on: 04.12. 2017 18:27 »
Quote
(Appreciate the tip about whacking the puller bolt).
The instructions that accompanied mine when I bought said that the correct usage was, that once the extractor was tightened up, you should hit it with a hammer and then tighten up again by one quarter of a turn, and then again use the hammer. This cycle should be repeated until the clutch centre is free. As has been said do not attempt to use it as a puller the threads will strip if you use the tool in this way. Also if it is the MCA tool that you have purchased I would most strongly advise that you examine the thread very closely before you attempt to use it. I had to do quite a lot of cleaning up to remove debris from the thread. Maybe I was just unfortunate, but do check that out.

Thanks for that.
Been looking at this video, shows me how it's done.  -  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbZqfPOJuog
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
Staffordshire UK

Offline a101960

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2007
  • Posts: 1040
  • Karma: 12
  • BSA RGS BSA C12
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #64 on: 04.12. 2017 19:25 »
Quote
Been looking at this video, shows me how it's done.
Maybe I am in the minority, but neither the crank sprocket nut nor the clutch centre  nut on my bike undid as easily as that, and just in case anyone is wondering the engine sprocket nut is an SRM one. Both needed 65 ft lbs to release, and that is the figure that I re torqued them to on reassembly, and I also applied blue loctite to the threads for good measure. To achieve that torque figure the clutch was locked with a clutch locking tool, and the primary chain needed to be fitted ensure the the engine did not turn over while doing up the engine sprocket. And, just in case you were unaware, use a cable tie to pull the ends of the chain together. It makes refitting the split link a piece of cake.

Offline chaterlea25

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Jun 2009
  • Posts: 3212
  • Karma: 46
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #65 on: 04.12. 2017 19:35 »
Hi All
Quote
The instructions that accompanied mine when I bought said that the correct usage was, that once the extractor was tightened up, you should hit it with a hammer and then tighten up again by one quarter of a turn, and then again use the hammer. This cycle should be repeated until the clutch centre is free. As has been said do not attempt to use it as a puller the threads will strip if you use the tool in this way.

The end of the "extractor" bolt is pointed hammering this into the end of the gearbox shaft is a none too clever idea
I have come across split mainshafts because of this *warn* *problem*

A few weeks ago I was brought a T140 bottom end where the owner had broken two pullers trying to remove the mainshaft pinion (plain shaft and keyway)
The PO had tried heat as well  *ex*
The end of the crank was mushroomed and blued from the abuse *sad2*

A better idea is to make a thick copper or brass pad that will sit in/on the end of the shaft so the pointy bolt will seat against that instead of the steel shaft
I have also seen the right hand end of the gearbox suffer from hammering the puller
It can break out the alloy around the RH bearing retaining circlip or dent the bearing races *warn*

Tension up the puller and pour a kettle of boiling water over the clutch shaft adaptor the "sudden" heat works better than applying a blow lamp that gives time for the heat to travel through to the main shaft as well

With decent quality pullers ( the ones that are black in colour usually have been heat treated)
an air or electric impact driver on the puller nut works well

John
1961 Super Rocket
1963 RGS (ongoing)

Offline RoyC

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2017
  • Posts: 1102
  • Karma: 7
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #66 on: 04.12. 2017 20:03 »
Quote
Been looking at this video, shows me how it's done.
Maybe I am in the minority, but neither the crank sprocket nut nor the clutch centre  nut on my bike undid as easily as that, and just in case anyone is wondering the engine sprocket nut is an SRM one. Both needed 65 ft lbs to release, and that is the figure that I re torqued them to on reassembly, and I also applied blue loctite to the threads for good measure. To achieve that torque figure the clutch was locked with a clutch locking tool, and the primary chain needed to be fitted ensure the the engine did not turn over while doing up the engine sprocket. And, just in case you were unaware, use a cable tie to pull the ends of the chain together. It makes refitting the split link a piece of cake.

Would this locking tool work with SRM clutch ?  -  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Triumph-BSA-3-4-spring-clutch-locking-tool-A7-A10-A55-A65-T100-T140/300610373705?hash=item45fdc64849:m:mrCmKunXbaZIT29Gh0CR5Eg

My bike is a 1958 A7SS
Staffordshire UK

Offline JulianS

  • 1962 A10
  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Mar 2017
  • Posts: 988
  • Karma: 20
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #67 on: 04.12. 2017 20:07 »
Dont know about the modern repro clutch pullers but both my ancient 4 and 6 spring pullers have very slightly domed bolts, not a pointed one. Both been in use over 40 years and no hint of threads pulling off. Maybe the repro items which shed threads are not made of the corect grade steel.

Offline RoyC

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2017
  • Posts: 1102
  • Karma: 7
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #68 on: 04.12. 2017 20:17 »
Dont know about the modern repro clutch pullers but both my ancient 4 and 6 spring pullers have very slightly domed bolts, not a pointed one. Both been in use over 40 years and no hint of threads pulling off. Maybe the repro items which shed threads are not made of the corect grade steel.

I have just had a look at the one that I am waiting for, no point on that bolt either.
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
Staffordshire UK

Offline RogerSB

  • 1960 Golden Flash, Plymouth, Devon, England
  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Aug 2017
  • Posts: 684
  • Karma: 9
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #69 on: 04.12. 2017 21:08 »
Quote
To achieve that torque figure the clutch was locked with a clutch locking tool, and the primary chain needed to be fitted ensure the the engine did not turn over while doing up the engine sprocket.

Yep! that's the way to do it. I also had to fit the brake pedal back on temporarily and persuade my wife to push down hard on the pedal to apply the rear brake to stop everything from turning.

If you really get stuck trying to get the clutch sleeve off (like I did) refer to my reply no 49. I had to grind a ring around mine about 1/8 deep with a small grinding wheel on a Proxxon (similar tool to a Dremel). Then I was able to use the split bearing separator, which got it off pdq *smile* . No pointy end to mess up your pushrod hole as the end is flat.

The locking tool looks right for the 4 spring. SRM sell them for £9.73 pt no 61-3760 (SRM no p249) on p2 of their tools section, so compare pictures.

1960 Golden Flash

Offline RogerSB

  • 1960 Golden Flash, Plymouth, Devon, England
  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Aug 2017
  • Posts: 684
  • Karma: 9
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #70 on: 04.12. 2017 21:35 »
Maybe the repro items which shed threads are not made of the corect grade steel.


I'd put money on that Julian.

1960 Golden Flash

Offline Rgs-Bill

  • A's Best Friend
  • ***
  • Join Date: Aug 2011
  • Posts: 166
  • Karma: 9
  • Rocket Gold Star-Bill - U S of A -- N.W. Corner
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #71 on: 04.12. 2017 21:40 »
  Does anyone know anything about the Liberty Sidecars, They are fairly newely manufactured in the U S of A, if they are any good, mounting hardware et. et.

         Also what are the chances of finding a good original Watsonian, BSA sidecar  ? ?


         
U S of A
N.W. Corner, Seattle 
1962 RGS
78 YEARS OLD
Still Kick Starting My Motor (9 TO 1)
Although getting a bit tougher to do ! !

Offline RoyC

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2017
  • Posts: 1102
  • Karma: 7
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #72 on: 05.12. 2017 07:20 »
  Does anyone know anything about the Liberty Sidecars, They are fairly newely manufactured in the U S of A, if they are any good, mounting hardware et. et.

         Also what are the chances of finding a good original Watsonian, BSA sidecar  ? ?


         
Can you see one on here ? The 1st & 18th pic is mine. -  https://www.google.de/search?q=Watsonian,+BSA+sidecar&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwij-faKqvLXAhVGGsAKHUF8CBcQsAQIJg&biw=1164&bih=537
My bike is a 1958 A7SS
Staffordshire UK

Online Greybeard

  • Jack of all trades; master of none.
  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Feb 2011
  • Posts: 6064
  • Karma: 35
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #73 on: 05.12. 2017 09:27 »
Before I was born my folks had a tandem cycle with a sidecar for my sister. When I came along they bought an Austin Seven.

Offline a101960

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2007
  • Posts: 1040
  • Karma: 12
  • BSA RGS BSA C12
Re: Clutch adjusting
« Reply #74 on: 05.12. 2017 10:03 »
Quote
Yep! that's the way to do it. I also had to fit the brake pedal back on temporarily and persuade my wife to push down hard on the pedal to apply the rear brake to stop everything from turning.
The best thing to do is to fabricate a piece of steel to make a handle as shown in the image below. No need to enlist the help of the wife then, it becomes a single person task. Just make sure that the "handle" is long enough to reach the ground then everything will be truly locked when you apply pressure to release or tighten up. Both engine sprocket, and the clutch centre nut need to been done up really tight. I was advised that 65 ft lbs was the correct figure to prevent either from becoming loose in service. John, my extractor centre bolt was not pointed and it worked just fine using the method advocated by the supplier, but I can see where you are coming from.