Author Topic: Motor strip  (Read 5486 times)

Online RichardL

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #60 on: 23.03. 2018 00:44 »
Mild steel spacers could be turned up on a lathe or even filed carefully to thickness

Don't have anything like your machinist skills (or, maybe, any), John, but I doubt you could start with fender washers. Am I correct? (I nean msde  by a normal human.)

Richard L.
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Online chaterlea25

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #61 on: 23.03. 2018 18:57 »
Hi Richard,
Thin washers do not like being held in a lathe chuck *sad*

John
1961 Super Rocket
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Offline tlmark

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #62 on: 24.03. 2018 13:11 »
We were thinking of using soft jaws as a sacrificial part and then hold the washer and turn them both together.

Offline muskrat

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #63 on: 24.03. 2018 19:32 »
They really need to be done with a surface grinder and magnetic chuck.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR, '76 XT500, '77 AG175 '83 CB1100F, '81 CB900F project.
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Online chaterlea25

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #64 on: 25.03. 2018 22:50 »
Hi All

Quote
We were thinking of using soft jaws as a sacrificial part and then hold the washer and turn them both together.
Yes I could see that working ( I do not have a chuck that you can add soft jaws to  *sad2*)

Quote
They really need to be done with a surface grinder and magnetic chuck.

Thin light parts do not hold well onto the magnetic chuck, additional keepers help

(I had forgotten about using  this method once or twice *conf2*)
I have successfully skimmed thin (ish) shims by super gluing them to a suitably turned mandrel
You have to take it real easy though *warn*  a little heat from a heat gun will break the super glue bond to release the shim

John
1961 Super Rocket
1963 RGS (ongoing)

Offline tlmark

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #65 on: 29.03. 2018 10:48 »
Cases are back from the machine shop and a very nice job was done too. and at what I thought was reasonably price £60 and a week to do it.
I hoping after Easter I might be able to start putting things back together.

Offline ellis

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #66 on: 29.03. 2018 11:32 »
Hi tlmark, Are you going to get it balanced before you put it back in the frame? It would be a shame not to just in case it has a balance issue.

ELLIS

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #67 on: 29.03. 2018 12:28 »
that's a very good idea one which I forgot to do at last motor strip, my front wheel and forks bounce about on tickover. I have seen many beezers that don't do this does anybody elses do this?. the running away on the center stand when reving the engine does seem to be a normal feature am I correct?

Online duTch

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #68 on: 29.03. 2018 12:40 »

 
Quote
my front wheel and forks bounce about on tickover. I have seen many beezers that don't do this does anybody elses do this?. the running away on the center stand when reving the engine does seem to be a normal feature am I correct?

  I have the centre stand thang too, mainly on hard surface, soft surface just becomes a vertical roadheader- put it down to normal, given the parallelometry of the moving bits.....I have a Conical Front End, but found long ago that if I hold the front brake on lightly at standstill it settles down
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
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Online Greybeard

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #69 on: 29.03. 2018 12:52 »
I cannot say that my bike vibrates a lot. Low comp probably helps, I guess.

Online Topdad

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #70 on: 29.03. 2018 15:04 »
plunger config as well gb playing apart there eh ??
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Offline Servodyne

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #71 on: 30.03. 2018 11:06 »
I've just finished my A10 Spifire and was very pleasantly surprised how smooth it turned out to be. I had considered getting it dynamically balanced by SRM or Basset, but in the end, I'm glad I didn't.
The crank didn't look as though it had been 'messed' with as there were only two holes drilled on the centre line of the flywheel. The pistons are BSA 67-1602 which I think are 8.75:1.
New main bearings obviously help with the vibrations. I had a Phos Bronze bush from JB restorations with 1.5 thou clearance on the timing and a NU206 EM C3 roller on the drive, which seemed vastly superior to the NF206 that I took out (see photo).
1957 BSA A10 Spitfire
1971 BSA A65 Firebird
1971 BSA A70 Lightning
1975 Norton Commando

Offline tlmark

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #72 on: 05.04. 2018 15:45 »
Some more progress today the crank ground, and main bored,  and end float measured (dial gauge)
I haven't been able to make the spacer I had planned, due to my engineering supplier not finding the new soft jaws for my lathe.  *problem*
But I do have 2 sets of shims, and if I use the 2 10 thou shims should bring it to somewhere between 1 and 2 thou end float we make it 1.7
not taking into account any bearing lock that may or may not interfere with the measurement.

Does that sound alright?

Online Sluggo

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #73 on: 05.04. 2018 21:11 »
I will STRONGLY advise you to have the crank and related bits DYNAMICALLY balanced, While I have yet to complete a A10 motor, I can say on many A65s they suffer from rocking couple and significant imbalances just as many other vertical twins do.
Nortons are the worst for this, and unthinkable in my mind to rebuild a Norton twin without a Dynamic balance. Triumphs have been 50/50 and gotten away with it many times, mostly with cheap shop customers who did not want to spend the dosh $$$$$$$$, But Rocking couple is inherent in the design and every A10 I ever saw vibrated quite a bit.
I can promise you 100% you will be very happy you did, I have NEVER built an engine for someone with Dynamic balancing who were not 100% highly impressed on how smooth it was when done.
If you dont ride it or just a static display, then thats a different matter.  Just my opinion.

To do it properly you will need to discuss 1st with the shop doing it, But some are better than others.  But the crank, sludge tube, plugs, rods, pistons, rings, pins & clips all need to go.  Some balance their clutch baskets, timing gears and other rotating bits but thats highly optional, But on alternator model twins you SHOULD have the alternator rotor balanced as well.  That is a HUGE lump flopping about and extrapolate the leverage of the lump its a no-brainer. Always interesting how far out some are, and how good others are as well but until checked you dont know.  My guy does the rotors for $10.   

Im sending out several Norton cranks soon for a couple builds and if you get over to the US I will be at the Norton INOA rally and you can try my N15 or Atlas.  People consider them bone shakers and I can promise they will give you a new perspective on how smooth a balanced and blueprinted engine can be.
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Offline worntorn

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Re: Motor strip
« Reply #74 on: 06.04. 2018 01:11 »
I just had my 1360 Vincent crank dynamically balanced. The big disappointment with that bike was the vibration level.
I hated the idea of pulling a new engine apart for the balance, but the bike was unrideable as it was for much more than 20 miles. On top of that, it would shake the push-in fuses right out of the fuse box!
Now it's a smoothy.
On test I set the Dakota Digital speedo / tach in tach only mode and tried the bike at a variety of rpms, top gear. It is now decently smooth from just off idle to 4000 Rpm and goes even smoother above that.
I tried it cruising at 5 k rpm in top for awhile. Lots of wind pressure but clear mirrors and smooth sailing. About 1/3 throttle gets 5 k rpm in fifth.
5 k rpm is way up there in speed, ( 125 mph) won't be doing much of that or the license will be gone!

Now I am tempted to pull the Super Rocket apart for same. Trouble is, it's not bad as is.

I agree, if it's apart, do the Dynamic.
Best $200 you can spend on the bike.

Glen