Author Topic: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.  (Read 590 times)

Offline A10 JWO

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Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« on: 09.05. 2018 17:56 »
Just cleaning up my restoration and have some small amounts of compound on my newly aqua-blasted inner cases. I normally use Hylomar, but this compound is a gold-mustard colour. Cannot remember the make but it is good. I don't want to spread any excess anywhere else. Any ideas on how to clean off the left-overs please, it's been on there about two months. Thanks.

Online bsa-bill

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #1 on: 09.05. 2018 18:12 »
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Loctite-Chisel-Gasket-Remover-400ml/dp/B002T8X0AS

Loctite gasket remover, I found it very good, one thing to watch - do not get it on any powder coated area or paintwork
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Online Greybeard

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #2 on: 09.05. 2018 18:22 »
What about some nail varnish remover/Acetone?

Online metalflake11

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #3 on: 09.05. 2018 20:12 »
This Loctite stuff might be ok, but would it shift Red Hermetite?

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Online Greybeard

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #4 on: 09.05. 2018 20:42 »
This Loctite stuff might be ok, but would it shift Red Hermetite?

The ultimate test!

I thought you just chiselled that stuff off like old cheese rind.

Online Rex

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #5 on: 10.05. 2018 09:14 »
Red Hermatite comes off with thinners. In fact, I haven't found jointing stuff which is unaffected by thinners yet.

Offline A10 JWO

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #6 on: 10.05. 2018 10:36 »
Bought some thinners this morning, thanks lads.

Offline Sluggo

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #7 on: 10.05. 2018 11:04 »
you didn't specify WHERE, and anything from Brake clean, Carb clean,Tri-chlor, MEK, Naptha (All very toxic-dont breath or use a respirator in closed space, Best is a fan blowing out) or milder Lacquer thinner, Poly/enamel reducer & 3m Abrasive pad for flat surfaces or a ball,cone or barrell shaped on the end of a drill. (Pick grade IE: 40,60,80, 100, 120 etc etc)

But what about a razor blade in a holder held at an angle? Or a good quality machinists file?  Pretty much any surface for jointing can benefit from a lapping in on a surface plate.  Poor mans or back yard method is on a leveled work bench and a large sheet of tempered glass (Salvaged car window, for extra style points tell your friends its a swedish or Northern European sheet of glass).

Tap a sheet of wet/dry sandpaper to the glass, (Remove dowels, studs, pins etc) and then apply some fine grade oil and lap them smooth.  Or, if you have access to a good machine shop a skilled machinist can true up the faces on a Mill with the lightest of kisses.

Rupert Ratio details the home mechanic truing method in his guide to Unit BSA Singles, I have yet to see any BSA engine that didnt benefit from trued up surfaces, Check out this guy surfacing car cyl heads in the back alley.

See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyKN52HD6RU
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Online RichardL

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #8 on: 10.05. 2018 12:50 »
Incredible respect for Sluggo's guru-level mecanical expertise and credentials, so much so that I'm finding it difficult to put what I want to say in words with the due respect. Nevertheless, maybe sealer removal and lapping/skimming are separate topics, even if sealer will definitely come off in the process. You wouldn't lap/skim every time you had to remove sealer.

 As Sluggo notes, "where" matters. The ridge and recess in the case mating faces is tedious, but possible, to attack with a razor.

My sealer removal process usually starts with mineral spirits and moves to other, more volatile,  chemistry if the spirits don't work (MEK, acetone). Using solvents rarely removes all traces of sealer but can soften or leave less to scrape off wth a razor (hand or holder-held) on aluminum or a chisel on steel.

I did not know about the Loctite product, but I'll be looking for it.

Ricard L.

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Offline Sluggo

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #9 on: 10.05. 2018 20:21 »
maybe sealer removal and lapping/skimming are separate topics, even if sealer will definitely come off in the process. You wouldn't lap/skim every time you had to remove sealer.

Ricard L.
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Correct Richard, generally 2 topics but I was looking at a different way, I Combined 2 topics in one and extended the original topic into BTW- have you considered this? Perhaps my logic/experience might need explanation.

For decades, I set aside what I wanted for myself aside as "One of these days Ill get to this" But primarily working on others machines, or building a machine to sell (Cars, motorcycles and a few airplanes, but Mrs Sluggo stopped me from keeping aircraft).  I have a very extensive collection piled up, a stupidly large number of projects.  So now is someday due to some life changing events, but being realistic I wont get to ALL of them, so readjusting.
But until now, it was unlikely I would ever see a project again in my shop, unless a custom.  I did 1/3rd stock and restos and 2/3rds customs because thats what paid the bills, Restos,,,, sadly, people rarely ride. So they dont wear out quick or even in a few decades.  Customs I would see back from time to time and while not a shop anymore per se, I still see a few for ones i like (owners).

But my philosophy was a project was ground zero, Do it once and do it correctly, so lapping in surfaces would be on the list.  If by chance someone else had done so, or the rare times I was back into one of mine,  it would just get whats needed.  I am not here to suggest that you or anyone needs to lap in and/or "Blueprint" for that matter an engine every time.  I am assuming that most of you fellows are not looking for a lifetime of gearbox rebuilds or engine rebuilds on the same machine, Most likely its the first and last time you will ever do the job,.i do greatly respect and admire those who have owned the same machine for 40-50 years and are now on their second or 3rd rebuild or refresh but assuming you did things correctly in the first place, a revisit to land o' camshafts or land o' layshafts is fairly easy & uneventful.

I study everyone I come across and try to extract what I can, But one guy took this practice to the extremes and serves as an excellent example to this way of thinking.  Kenny Dreer of Notrun fame.  He got quickly to the point that Nortons were a great machine but extremely flawed.  You *MIGHT* get a Wednesday bike (like Glens 850 that never gives any trouble) but they are all suspect. So they got torn down to the extreme and every part was inspected and "Blue printed" and built back up.  THEN you had a known entity and a solid bike.  (Dreer was not perfect and mistakes were made along the way)  If you follow this method on vintage machinery its painful on the front end a bit, But very comforting on the long haul.  I also suffer from
"Knockitis" and have a hard time riding a machine without obsessing what noises might entail and imaganing calamity. So, its comforting to me that I *KNOW* that everything inside is as good as it can be.

I do have some late model stuff (Ducatis, Buells and Evo HD sportsters) and I address their upgrades but have not torn them down to the foundation for a variety of reasons.
---------------------------------------
But as to sealers, last night was thinking that, some respond well to cleaning with solvents and some dont. Depends on what the sealer was.  Based on description it sounds like one of those 3 bonds which tend to be hard and cured.  Those take razor blades and abrasives to remove, Others will melt and wipe away with solvents. 
Remember that any advice received on a free internet forum is generally worth about 1/2 of what you paid for it.
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Online RichardL

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #10 on: 11.05. 2018 00:58 »
Good stories, Sluggo. Always interesting. Thanks.
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Offline A10 JWO

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #11 on: 11.05. 2018 16:51 »
Tried thinners, did not work at all ???? . It took the blue non setting off of my crank case but not the first one I described, it has a glazed look ?

Online RichardL

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Re: Gasket Jointing Compound removal.
« Reply #12 on: 11.05. 2018 18:45 »
... it has a glazed look.

As do I.
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020 (if it's not cancelled and we are free to move about by then). Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.