Author Topic: welding  (Read 1288 times)

Online RichardL

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Re: welding
« Reply #15 on: 24.06. 2018 21:37 »
From the replies, I'm beginning to think I'm the only one left who welds with oxyacetylene. Sometimes a mig, but I'm better with the torch.

Me too. As it is, I think Beman may have to turn the bike upside down to weld in place. *conf* In any case it's going to be quite close to the primary case.

Richard L.
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020. This year it's a solo or pillion ride in dapper attire. Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.


Offline Beeza

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Re: welding
« Reply #16 on: 24.06. 2018 23:23 »
Be aware that you may have trouble moving the foot peg out of the way to get the primary cover off, as the front part of the chain guard stops the foot peg stub from being removed.
If you do weld it, make sure you can easily get to it with a grinder or such to separate them again

Offline duTch

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Re: welding
« Reply #17 on: 25.06. 2018 00:40 »

 I'm out of touch with S/A's, but would it be viable to run the bolt through the other way ?
 
 
Quote
From the replies, I'm beginning to think I'm the only one left who welds with oxyacetylene. Sometimes a mig, but I'm better with the torch.

 I have a gas set that I used for several years when living in the bush with no power and quite like it for lots of tasks, but bottle rental increases made that unviable, so now with access to spark food, I invested first in a small Arc welder,  and then a cheapo MIG that I run with gasless wire- one of my best investments.... when I did my aforementioned misdemeanor, I knew full well about isolating the job from the vehicle, but somehow had a massive brain fart and because I was welding a steel beam not part of the 'tilly *bright idea* I had it supported by the edge of the tray.... *bash*

Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
Australia

Online RichardL

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Re: welding
« Reply #18 on: 25.06. 2018 01:41 »
...as the front part of the chain guard stops the foot peg stub from being removed.

OK, this is the bit I was missing. My swingarm has no chain guard, never has while I've owned it. So, I was unaware of the obstruction. Sorry if I confused matters.

Richard L.
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020. This year it's a solo or pillion ride in dapper attire. Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.


Offline worntorn

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Re: welding
« Reply #19 on: 25.06. 2018 04:26 »
Re Tig, Mig or arc welding anything on a bike, car or Caterpillar.
Attach the ground clamp adjacent the weld so that the flow of electricity can go through the object being welded and to ground without travelling through any electrical component or machine bearing.
For example the exact wrong way to weld is to hang a ground cable on the back winch of a Cat D9 then proceed to strike a 400 amp arc on the dirt blade at front.
The high powered current has the potential to arc every bearing in the machine plus destroy electrical.
Instead, hang the ground clamp on the blade right by the weld and no harm occurs.

The same principle applies to the motorcycle footpeg.

Glen

Offline duTch

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Re: welding
« Reply #20 on: 25.06. 2018 06:05 »

 ^^^^ good point that- sometimes I weld the clamp to the job (I have a piece of metal bolted and or welded to the clamp for the purpose )
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
Australia

Online Greybeard

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Re: welding
« Reply #21 on: 25.06. 2018 09:03 »
For example the exact wrong way to weld is to hang a ground cable on the back winch of a Cat D9 then proceed to strike a 400 amp arc on the dirt blade at front. The high powered current has the potential to arc every bearing in the machine plus destroy electrical...
*bash*  *smile*

Online BSA_54A10

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Re: welding
« Reply #22 on: 25.06. 2018 09:38 »

 I'm out of touch with S/A's, but would it be viable to run the bolt through the other way ?
 
 
Quote
From the replies, I'm beginning to think I'm the only one left who welds with oxyacetylene. Sometimes a mig, but I'm better with the torch.

 I have a gas set that I used for several years when living in the bush with no power and quite like it for lots of tasks, but bottle rental increases made that unviable, so now with access to spark food, I invested first in a small Arc welder,  and then a cheapo MIG that I run with gasless wire- one of my best investments.... when I did my aforementioned misdemeanor, I knew full well about isolating the job from the vehicle, but somehow had a massive brain fart and because I was welding a steel beam not part of the 'tilly *bright idea* I had it supported by the edge of the tray.... *bash*

I am a committed gas welder and will remain so in the forseeable future.
Bought a Dillon gun back in the 80's and never looked back.
When Lind`e gas kicked off they allowed customers to buy their bottles ( at the price of 2 bottles ) which I took up thus paying no bottle rental till they sold out in 2005.
One of the tool companies ( Toolex I think ) took CIG ( BOC ) to court about refusing to refill bottles other than their own & won the case , although you have been hard pressed to hear about it.
Thus now days they , and all other gas suppliers are compelled by law to refill any legal bottle presented.
Liquid air did the dirty and changed all of the valves on their bottles to ones that are not available retail and of course their filling stations are now incompatiable with any other bottle ( morons ) but BOC could not afford to do the same thus you can buy bottles from almost any of the bigger tool store franchises and because of the same court case the refill price is almost the same. And about time.
Bike Beesa
Trevor

Online Greybeard

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Re: welding
« Reply #23 on: 25.06. 2018 09:41 »
I wonder if that's true in the UK.

Online bsa-bill

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Re: welding
« Reply #24 on: 25.06. 2018 09:43 »
Quote
I wonder if that's true in the UK.
Well l I have a shell butane cylinder that's redundant (different use but same thing)
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Online Greybeard

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Re: welding
« Reply #25 on: 25.06. 2018 10:12 »
Quote
I wonder if that's true in the UK.
Well l I have a shell butane cylinder that's redundant (different use but same thing)
I'm currently making a wood burner out of a butane cylinder. I believe you can potentially get into trouble doing this as the cylinder remains the property of the gas company.
If your interested, there are videos on YT showing how to do this.

Offline duTch

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Re: welding
« Reply #26 on: 25.06. 2018 11:05 »

 
Quote
Posted by: BSA_54A10
« on: Today at 19:38:00 »    ......I am a committed gas welder.............
Bought a Dillon gun back in the 80's and never looked back.
When Lind`e gas kicked .......
One of the tool companies ..............And about time.......

 I've seriously abbreviated Trevs post- read it for reference....

 Trev Thanks for the reminder and heads ups, that's about when I bought my gear- Dillon Mk 111....came in a promo bundle with 'Messer Gresham ? ' Gauges, and  still kickin' around somewhere...I never really got the hang of it for some things, but think I mostly used it for welding- Are spares still available? also knew someone working at a Big mine, who 'upgraded' and I scored some shrapnel... *good3*
 I'll have to chase up that other useful info too...the thing with the bottles is that they need to be within test date, and as far as I'm aware, testing isn't cheap either for the average punter..

 B-B & GB's posts noted...with intent *eek*


Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
Australia

Online bsa-bill

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Re: welding
« Reply #27 on: 25.06. 2018 11:57 »
Quote
I'm currently making a wood burner out of a butane cylinder. I believe you can potentially get into trouble doing this as the cylinder remains the property of the gas company.

Cheers GB, we are all electric so no need for log burners (although cost of energy ???)
I did a Welding course so many years ago, both gas and electric, yes I liked the acetylene but god it was hot in the room we did it in, used my (skills???) at work sometimes, one of those skills tho that is better with regular usage, sort of have to learn all over again if left years or even months. specially the rhythm needed for gas 
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Online Greybeard

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Re: welding
« Reply #28 on: 25.06. 2018 13:43 »
We have a proper log burner in the house but it's really only for additional cosyness as we have gas central heating.

The one I'm making is intended for a garden house. I've been looking for some suitable steel pipe to use as the flue. I didn't want to buy new pipe because my burner may not work, plus new pipe is not cheap. I was out on the Beeza last week. and stopped in a quiet country lane for a rest. Right beside me in long grass there was a road sign that someone had collided with and neatly taken out of the ground. About 3 feet from the bottom there is bend of 45°, but it's all useable. It has a diameter of about 3". I went back after dark in the car and strapped the pipe onto the roof bars. I removed the road sign and left it there. The pipe was destined for the scrap yard so I don't feel too guilty about stealing it.

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Re: welding
« Reply #29 on: 25.06. 2018 16:50 »
I dug my MIG set out to weld hinges on this log burner. It's been about ten years since I used the welder. It took me a while to get a half decent bead but eventually I got the hinges glued on.

A YT video showed a great tip: cut a vertical slot where the hinges are going to be attached and weld the hinges on before you cut the other three sides of the door. This ensures that the door is accurately hinged.

Cutting a hole in the top of the cylinder for the flue was a challenge. I had to drill tiny holes around the edge and chisel the metal away between them, then clean up the jagged edge. A plasma or gas cutter would useful.