Author Topic: Sawn off seat tube!  (Read 314 times)

Offline Steverat

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Sawn off seat tube!
« on: 12.09. 2018 22:37 »
Doing more work on Josef's A10, I noticed at a late stage in stripdown, but just early enough to avoid being nutted by the frame - a PO has sawn the seat tube! Yes sawn right through. I've made a sleeve for my welding genius to join the two ends back together again. Here is a pic. Why would anyone want to do this?

1951 BSA A10 - now returned to Germany
1972 Triumph T100R Daytona
1924 B-S SS80
1965 Triumph SH Cub
1960 AJS M18CS

Offline coater87

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Re: Sawn off seat tube!
« Reply #1 on: 13.09. 2018 01:33 »
 Thats too bad, but I am sure you will make it right.

 I bet 90% of all "choppers" ended up as rusting pieces in cardboard boxes. Most of the builders had just enough skill and money to take everything apart, cut a bunch of stuff up, and throw away the hard to find parts.

 Lee
Central Wisconsin in the U.S.

Online Rex

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Re: Sawn off seat tube!
« Reply #2 on: 13.09. 2018 09:18 »
Very true Lee. Taking it apart and sawing bits off is the easy part and that's  as far as most ever got.

Offline RayC10

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Re: Sawn off seat tube!
« Reply #3 on: 13.09. 2018 17:46 »
Mine actually had sheared off at that same place, maybe it wasn't sawn. It had been an abused side car hack. I made a sleeve the same and brazed and riveted it, has lasted 40 years so no probs.

Offline Steverat

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Re: Sawn off seat tube!
« Reply #4 on: 14.09. 2018 06:25 »
Mine actually had sheared off at that same place, maybe it wasn't sawn. It had been an abused side car hack. I made a sleeve the same and brazed and riveted it, has lasted 40 years so no probs.

There’s no way it could’ve sheared, you can see the marks from the hacksaw. Yes I suppose a braze repair will be better than welding on a sleeved joint, the braze will penetrate into the joint. All the rest of the frame is brazed anyway. Still scratching my head about this, it’s right in the middle of the bike and would have been quite difficult to do, and nothing has been taken off — just this silly desecration of a beautiful Small Heath product.

1951 BSA A10 - now returned to Germany
1972 Triumph T100R Daytona
1924 B-S SS80
1965 Triumph SH Cub
1960 AJS M18CS