Author Topic: What could possibly go wrong (oil leak timing side)  (Read 420 times)

Online a101960

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I mentioned a few days ago that I was going to remove the inner timing cove to fix a slight weep. So, what could possibly go wrong? Well everything went well, and it all went back together with no problem or so I thought, until I went out for a test ride. The weep that I intended to fix has now become a torrent.

I was out riding around for half an hour or so and when I pulled up at home very a large puddle appeared under the bike. I was very meticulous about the preparation making sure all the surfaces were clean before fitting the gasket. When I stripped it all back down again I could see no obvious reason for what has happened.

I must admit I was a bit dubious about just four screws holding the cover in place but despite my doubts it has stood the test of time. So, what to do now? Fit yet another new gasket obviously, but should I also use a sealer such as Yamabond? By the way all the retaining screws were tight when I removed the timing covers to investigate the problem. Is there anything that I might have done incorrectly.

When I was younger and less well informed I would have been reaching for and applying several tubes of red Hermetite or silicon sealer. So some advice on what to do would be very welcome. I am inclined to towards Yamabond on both sides of the gasket whats the general opinion. One thing is for sure I really don't want a repeat of today's disaster.
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Online Greybeard

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Re: What could possibly go wrong (oil leak timing side)
« Reply #1 on: 01.10. 2018 20:16 »
I know nothing of Yamabond. I've been using Blue Hylomar for many years. The only other sealer I have used, a long time ago, was Red Hermatite. I would not use silicone.
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Online muskrat

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Re: What could possibly go wrong (oil leak timing side)
« Reply #2 on: 01.10. 2018 21:06 »
I use Permatex #3 non hard setting on both sides. Most of the time the gasket comes off intact and can be reused.
If it's going to be some time before your ready to fit the outer cover (as most of those screws go through the inner cover) I use packers and put all the other screws in and tension them
Cheers
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Offline coater87

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Re: What could possibly go wrong (oil leak timing side)
« Reply #3 on: 02.10. 2018 17:22 »
 So did you use a dry paper gasket this time?

 I was taught way back to oil a paper gasket when you install it. I was told this starts the swelling process. It's the swelling that does the sealing.

 I was also told to not get excited if it leaked at first. Wait a day or 2 than tighten again. It was explained to do this 3 times, than change the gasket if it still leaks.

 I dont like the idea of yamabond (three bond I believe is the identical product) on any cover that's already hard to get off.

 Take the outer timing cover for instance. Once that yamabond is sealed for a while, it's going to be hard to get that cover off without trying to jam something into the joint to force the covers apart. There is nothing to grab to pull the cover off, rubber hammer won't shift that stuff, your backing yourself into a corner.

 If I am using yamabond, it's on one side of the gasket, grease on the other. I am putting yamabond on the part that comes off and I can get away from the bike. That way when I have to go back in there in the future I can scrap off the gasket and sealant without getting crap inside the motor.

I also like gaskacinch, it's like a rubber cement. One or both sides, but again it will glue covers down pretty well.

 Try to never use silicone on anything. It's for leaking roof gutters and plugging oil passages.

 Lee
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Online RDfella

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Re: What could possibly go wrong (oil leak timing side)
« Reply #4 on: 02.10. 2018 18:05 »
Something not right here and rather than gunk up the gasket I'd be looking for the reason. Need to fix the cause, not the symptoms. Are those faces flat, or have they warped? Is there anything that could be preventing them going right home, such as a washer protruding somewhere? Are the screws pulling tight or getting threadbound? BTW, I always grease a paper gasket when fitting. If nothing else, that holds it in place during assembly. If I'm concerned about possible leaks, like Greybeard I use a thin wipe of Hylomar on one side of the gasket. Hylomar was allegedly designed by RR - probably to keep oil in their diesel engines, because my experience of RR diesels is that there's more oil on the outside than the inside. On a boat I used to get to work on a private island where we had the contract for maintaining the machinery, the engines leaked so much we kept a 40 gal barrel of lube oil on board. That was in the 60's and presumably they developed Hylomar as a consequence. At least that's my opinion. It's good stuff.
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Online Black Sheep

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Re: What could possibly go wrong (oil leak timing side)
« Reply #5 on: 02.10. 2018 18:52 »
There must be a cause. That much oil means that the inner or outer cover are not seating properly. On my bikes, I simply lightly grease both sides of the gaskets and they seal perfectly.
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Offline Bsareg

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Re: What could possibly go wrong (oil leak timing side)
« Reply #6 on: 03.10. 2018 09:58 »
Have you run a tap through the screw threads to clear out old sealer etc ? Its surprising what comes out sometimes.
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Re: What could possibly go wrong (oil leak timing side)
« Reply #7 on: 03.10. 2018 10:27 »
Best way to check seating in a situation like this is to put the cases together without gaskets and check for fit. Do they go right home? Do they rock? Are you sure the oil is coming from a gasket, or it it somewhere else, such as one of the pipes to the tank?
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Offline duTch

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Re: What could possibly go wrong (oil leak timing side)
« Reply #8 on: 03.10. 2018 11:42 »

 My first suggestion is to just have a close look at where the leaks is coming from....I spent a heap of time making my outer cover flat and the whole bizzo, but even after a couple of installs and removals, it just wants to take on a banana shape, but still seals ok... there must be something amiss, like if the gasket faces are wide enough...? Prime example in my case was the interface between the dynamo drive chamber and oil pump chamber, which I had to have built up with weld... *pull hair out* but that's internal and maybe not your problem....but food for thought
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