Author Topic: Belt transmission?  (Read 340 times)

Online Greybeard

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Belt transmission?
« on: 05.10. 2018 21:19 »
What a beast!

Online BigJim

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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #1 on: 05.10. 2018 22:04 »
Love the size of that petrol tank. He must have got lots of rewards when he filled up. world cup coins (of which i have one still unopened), cheap glass tumblers and other c..p dished out of filling stations in the 70's and 80's.
Jamie,  Supporter of Distinguished Gentleman's Ride

Online Greybeard

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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #2 on: 05.10. 2018 22:29 »
Bet he could pull great wheelies!

Offline muskrat

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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #3 on: 06.10. 2018 00:31 »
When men were men and everything else was nervous.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR, '76 XT500, '77 AG175 '83 CB1100F, '81 CB900F project.
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Offline cyclobutch

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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #4 on: 08.10. 2018 13:18 »
Accepting that it is not equipped for road use, 330 lb is very respectable. Kind of a radial but with bits removed or blanked off, though the barrels look oddly paired. Wonder how they balanced it - or maybe it just doesn't rev fast enough to worry?
Various, including ...
'58 Iron Head Flash Bitza


Online Greybeard

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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #5 on: 08.10. 2018 15:15 »
Sorry, I meant to paste a link to where I saw this machine. The engine was originally made for aeroplanes. The motorcycle was made for pacing.

Online BigJim

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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #6 on: 08.10. 2018 19:42 »
I was going to say aeroplane engine! Wish i had taken a chance to look clever. Note to self, have a go then blag if questioned.
Jamie,  Supporter of Distinguished Gentleman's Ride

Offline coater87

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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #7 on: 09.10. 2018 00:06 »
 Wonder if that baby was equipped with an interrupter gear.... ;)

 Lee
Central Wisconsin in the U.S.

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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #8 on: 09.10. 2018 09:02 »
Wonder if that baby was equipped with an interrupter gear.... ;)
I needed to look that term up. Look at that picture of their timing disk!
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synchronization_gear

Online duTch

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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #9 on: 09.10. 2018 09:22 »

 
Quote
I was going to say aeroplane engine! Wish i had taken a chance to look clever. Note to self, have a go then blag if questioned

 Don't feel left out, I thought the same was obvious,but just didn't bother...  *beer*
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
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Offline cyclobutch

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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #10 on: 09.10. 2018 09:28 »
I think it was first fitted to the Eindecker and was what made it such a formidable machine. Prior to that they fitted deflectors on the propeller. And maybe it was offered to the Bits first and they turned it down?

Various, including ...
'58 Iron Head Flash Bitza


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Re: Belt transmission?
« Reply #11 on: 09.10. 2018 11:09 »
I found that page again:
https://cybermotorcycle.com/euro/brands/esnault-pelterie.htm

Here is the picture text:

A Five-cylindered Motor Bicycle.

ON January 15th there appeared in The Motor Cycle, page 56, sectional line drawings of the lightest petrol engine for its power which has ever been constructed. The name of this engine, as readers may remember, is the Esnault-Pelterie, designed and built in ' France for aerial navigation. The engine has several very distinguishing and clever features, principal among which may be mentioned the method of attaching the connecting rods to the crankshaft. The valves are situated in the top of the combustion head, and the inlet and exhaust valves are combined.

We reproduce herewith an illustration in section of the valve arrangement, as without it it would be difficult to understand the method of operating the valves and distributing the inlet and exhaust gases. The line drawing shows the exhaust slide valve A seated. When the slide valve A is opened towards the end of the working stroke, it leaves a free passage foi the exhaust gases to escape through the holes B and C directly into the atmosphere. At the end of the exhaust stroke the slide valve A, instead of closing, opens still further, causing the collar D to come to rest against the corner ot the angle E, so that air cannot enter via C and B. When the collar D is at rest, the inlet holes F are open, and there is direct communication between the carburetter and the cylinder via the holes H and F. The onlv practical difference between the seven-cylindered engine constructed for propelling an aeroplane and the five-cylindered motor bicvcle engine which is the subject of the present article is the number of cylinders The bicycle engine, as will be seen from the accompanying illustrations, has five cylinders staggered round the crank chamber in the the same way as the seven-cylindered engine.

One carburetter serves the whole five cylinders, whereas in the seven-cylindered engine there is one carburetter for each group of cylinders. It will be noticed that the designer of the motor bicycle has cleverly utilised the space occupied by the crank case, and has dished a large flat-faced engine pulley over it. The back belt rim is of wood with wooden arms, and should allow the flat belt to obtain a good grip of the pulley face. The weight of the engine is 60 lbs only, length of wheelbase 3ft. 5in., diameter of front wheel 28in., rear wheel 3oin. The Ignition is by plain coil and make and break contact, and the distributer is the larger of the two cases seen on the side of the crank case in the top picture.

The machine is, of course, intended for pacing purposes, and with its aid a French cyclist (Gombault, paced by Coutant) hopes to beat the record by covering 100 kilometres within the hour.

The Motor Cycle, June 3rd, 1908 Page 433