Author Topic: What prevented you from working on your bikes today  (Read 1918 times)

Online Black Sheep

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #75 on: 22.07. 2019 06:48 »
Spent hours attempting to interpret the sacred texts (1). Donned my ceremonial robes (2). Made a pilgrimage to the Sept of Baler (3). After many incantations (4) and arcane rituals with the holy objects (5) I finally summoned the almighty power (6) and behold, a miracle! (7).
1. Amazingly confusing New Holland 276 Hayliner manual
2. Oily boiler suit
3. Tractor shed
4. Language!
5. Spanners, hammer, large blunt objects
6. David Brown 995
7. The baler is back in working order.
Apologies to Game of Thrones fans.     
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Online berger

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #76 on: 22.07. 2019 12:40 »
biker bob I have thought that about master cylinder but it is a brand new stainless [very expensive!] unit. I am going to get a helper to press on the peddle when ime underneath and see if a flexy pipe is ballooning up - but not today *smile*

Online Greybeard

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #77 on: 22.07. 2019 13:18 »
biker bob I have thought that about master cylinder but it is a brand new stainless [very expensive!] unit. I am going to get a helper to press on the peddle when ime underneath and see if a flexy pipe is ballooning up - but not today *smile*
I had a '49 Series 'E' Morris. I also had a couple of early '50's, Split Screen, Minors. One still had the side-valve engine. The master cylinder on those was located in a frame channel under the floor and a right bugger to change as they tend to rust in place. Is the Series E master cylinder in the same place?

Online berger

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #78 on: 22.07. 2019 14:04 »
greybeard the master cylinder is in the same place , I helped the previous owner to fit it. my dad had split screen moggy's  and later moggy's so he could fix his hand clutch mechanism to the steering tube , he couldn't press with his left leg after a bad smash on a rudge in the early fifties in fog

Online RDfella

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #79 on: 22.07. 2019 18:20 »
As I recall, on the minors another hassle was the torsion bar getting in the way of removing the master cyl bolts. Used to have a minor van, but one day the brakes failed as I was turning into a side road. Yanked on the handbrake and broke the cable...... I steered into a field, phoned my recovery man and told him to take it to the dump.
'49 B31, '49 M21, '53 DOT, '58 Flash, '00 Firestorm, Weslake sprint bike.

Online Greybeard

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #80 on: 22.07. 2019 22:53 »
As I recall, on the minors another hassle was the torsion bar getting in the way of removing the master cyl bolts. Used to have a minor van, but one day the brakes failed as I was turning into a side road. Yanked on the handbrake and broke the cable...... I steered into a field, phoned my recovery man and told him to take it to the dump.
Yes, I'd forgotten about the torsion bar getting in the way. Super idea for front suspension though. So simple!

Offline Topdad

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #81 on: 23.07. 2019 10:47 »
Back in the early 70's I worked selling "bargain" cars in Liverpool ,one such car that didn't sell was a moggy and I had to take it to the auctions out in the south of the city ,going through the dingle on park lane,  on a steep hill the brakes went ,jeez  it got very interesting , the handbrake lever was almost up to the roof and just got to the auction site  ,parked it up and 10 mins later there was a brake pedal resistance again again.
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Online Greybeard

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #82 on: 23.07. 2019 12:06 »
Remind me to tell you about the brakes failing on our Series 2 Landy when my wife, who'd recently passed her test was driving.

Online Black Sheep

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #83 on: 23.07. 2019 14:35 »
Go on, tell us.
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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #84 on: 23.07. 2019 19:09 »
Are you sitting comfortably?

Then I'll begin.

My wife learnt to drive while we had a veritable Long Wheelbase Series 2 diesel Land Rover. I had been warned by the friend who sold me the vehicle, that, as the handbrake drum is fixed to the back of the gearbox you must not apply the handbrake while the vehicle is moving as it might rip out of the gearbox! I strongly impressed this advice to Janet, my wife.
One day, Janet was driving, alone, down a street on a hill in our town, (Great Malvern)  when the brake pedal hit the floor.  Luckily, the vehicle was not going very fast. She first steered into the kerb to try to stop, but those huge wheels just rolled over it and onto the footpath. Luckily there were no people on the path. As there were vehicles parked a bit further down the street she considered running the Landy into a garden wall. She didn't want to destroy someone's wall so she  gingerly pulled on the handbrake lever which is long with plenty of leverage. The Land rover shuddered to a stop, half in the road and half on the footpath. The handbrake remained attached to the gearbox! The vehicle was left there until I got home from work. I pumped the brake pedal and got it firm enough to drive the 100 yards to home.
A slave cylinder rubber had blown.

As you may imagine, this incident is often quoted by my Wifey!

Online Black Sheep

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #85 on: 23.07. 2019 20:57 »
However, riding home from work one day I came across a splash in the road which turned out to be brake fluid, some gouges in the road from a broken prop shaft and a long line of somewhat damaged parked cars and then a Series 3 lwb Land Rover. It all depends on just how fast you are going when you yank on the hand brake.
Fortunately, the only time the foot went to the floor on my old Land Rover was when I was in 2nd gear so managed to stop ok. Oh, the joy of running old vehicles!
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Online RDfella

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #86 on: 23.07. 2019 21:56 »
And whilst on brake failure, don’t forget to change your brake fluid regularly. Around 1980 was driving my Mk4 Cortina to the club one evening. Was hammering it a bit (I’d fitted a lovely cam & carb) when, on braking to turn up a side road, discovered I had no brakes at all. Applied handbrake and gingerly used the next left turn to get to the club. Around two hours later when I left, brakes were perfect. What had happened was some water was obviously in the brake fluid (isn’t it slightly hygroscopic?) and it had boiled. Steam makes a pretty poor braking fluid. Bled the brakes the following day and they’ve been fine ever since (still have that car).
'49 B31, '49 M21, '53 DOT, '58 Flash, '00 Firestorm, Weslake sprint bike.

Offline Swarfcut

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #87 on: 24.07. 2019 08:56 »
RD  With you on this, brake fluid change was rarely done, but these days with modern systems it is a must.
  Brake fluid certainly is hygroscopic, very much so. Traditionally it was Glycol (a higher alcohol) based, and we know how alcohol seeks out moisture. I put some used fluid into a pile of sawdust, ready to burn on our woodstove. Overnight it absorbed atmospheric moisture and in the morning was literally a mushy mess from which water could be squeezed. Silicone fluids are endorsed by some, as a better alternative, but condemned by purveyors of traditional brake fluids.

     I thought brake fluid changed colour, darkening to an nice orange brown with natural ageing. How naive? It is moisture in the fluid, the resulting rust causing the colour change as the cast master cylinder, slave cylinders and steel brake pipes degrade. Years ago I never routinely changed the fluid. and just waited for the supposedly inevitable failures.. The pipes rusted,  slave cylinders seized and master cylinders got pitted bores. Replacement of the parts was relatively cheap and easy, and that was when the fluid got changed. Not so today. ABS units  are expensive, so having a professional fluid change on a regular basis is cheap insurance against major expense.  How many of us have struggled with a broken bleed nipple, making a simple job into a major inconvenience. In cost cutting development they seem smaller and weaker than they used to be.  Even changing brake pipes is no longer the straightforward job of a previous age, looks as if in modern manufacture the brake pipes go onto the bodyshell first so a simple pipe change requires major dismantling of other components.

 GB  We used to run a Landrover 90. The parking brake on the transmission made the whole thing creak and groan so from experience was only applied when stationary. The construction  and use rules used to  say the handbrake should be capable of stopping the vehicle in an emergency. In Landrover parlance, it does that, generally by exploding major parts of the transmission and chassis. I heard the folklore and was a bit scared to pull on that handbrake lever at any speed!

 Swarfy.

Online RDfella

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #88 on: 24.07. 2019 11:25 »
Those gearbox mounted brakes were indeed only a parking brake. And not much use at that as, by locking the propshaft, they only worked on one wheel - the one with the least grip of course. They were also used on Bedford lorries, including coaches. One day our local testing station did an emergency stop with one and duly wrecked the transmission. Must have cost then a few quid. In my view, using those brakes at speed would be OK, provided they were applied gently and not just snatched on. It's the shock load that'll rip things apart.
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Online berger

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Re: What prevented you from working on your bikes today
« Reply #89 on: 24.07. 2019 12:47 »
its the shock load that'll rip things apart, don't I know it- always have from being a child on the old trolley's - carts etc, I knew the old car wouldn't like 2nd gear but panic set in and needs must. this afternoon I will be having a butchers at things to try and find out the brake failure. its only two summers ago me and the then owner spent two days bleeding and adjusting the brakes, I hope to find an answer . I will be reporting back . in the meantime I have jumped in and bought another axle off evil bay. again needs must , I bet these things are rocking horse poo *dunno*