Author Topic: Plunger tool box  (Read 693 times)

Online muskrat

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Re: Plunger tool box
« Reply #15 on: 03.05. 2019 09:22 »
G'day Adrian.
Something bug'd me about your tool box. Mine doesn't have the lug/ear at the bottom like yours.
Now I'll have to investigate!
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7

Offline AdrianJ

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Re: Plunger tool box
« Reply #16 on: 03.05. 2019 09:55 »
Hi Musky,
I must admit I was curious about the lug. When I got the bike, the lug was fastened to the bottom frame tube with a home made strap and a p-clip, probably the one which should have fastened the tool box to the top frame tube.
Isn't the internal strip across the toolbox missing as well?
Regards,
Adrian
'53 Plunger Flash, Steib S500.


Online Greybeard

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Re: Plunger tool box
« Reply #17 on: 03.05. 2019 10:17 »
So, are you saying that production Plunger models did not use the early toolbox?

If not, that picture could explain the fact that restored bikes sometimes have the early box.

Offline duTch

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Re: Plunger tool box
« Reply #18 on: 03.05. 2019 11:36 »
 I bought a box at a swap meet a few years back and always figured it's original from a rigid model... based at the time on images of  Plunger models I saw.

 I prefer the shape of it to the Plunger ones anyway , and the shape and length suited me better because of the need to jam the battery in there, but wasn't wide enough, so used it as a template to make a 'fatter' one...  *work*.... got the back done and that's good enough to ride it (6 years ago).... work in progress.... *smile*..

 ** I reckon a battery enclosed in there would trust it out anyway

 * edit ; it doesn't have that lug either- wondered about that  *conf2*
 
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
Australia

Offline BSA_54A10

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Re: Plunger tool box
« Reply #19 on: 03.05. 2019 14:20 »
So, are you saying that production Plunger models did not use the early toolbox?

If not, that picture could explain the fact that restored bikes sometimes have the early box.

The literature for new models was printed substantially before the bikes were made.
If there was no "new" tinwear available by the deadline for the photography then they used what they could get their hands on.
A catalogue image is not & never has been a definative answer as to what the bike looked like at the despatch dock.

Look at all of the catalogue images that show B50's with ivory frames.
There were 12 and only 12 press bikes made with ivory frames, all of the production bikes were black.
Similar with the twins.
They started off being ivory but reverted to black before the season ended but you will not find a catalogue showing them black framed.

People with no idea of what a bike actually looked like get a photocopy of the catalogue & build that bike because they are too lazy to do proper research.
Remember all the who har about rocket tank colours.
Now if an owner made the effort to get an extract from the dispatch books it would state exactly what the finish was but dozens right here swore on a stack of parts books they were all red.
Now BSA being BSA would not have fitted the old tool boxes, if the new ones were available, but if the only ones on hand were rigid boxes then the plungers got rigid boxes.
This was particularly the case with export bikes as BSA bought the space on the ships well in advance which even today comes at a substantial discount.
SO if they needed 300 plunger A 10's to fill the space that is what got loaded, right parts or wrong parts.
Now as it happens Ken , one of our club members bought his 1950 A 10 off the catalogue before they left the factory.
As far as we know he had the very first plunger A 10 registered in Australia as the ship off loaded 10 in Sydney before it off loaded 12 in Melbourne, so we got ours a week before Melbourne did.
Kens bike has the bigger plunger box fitted so it was not a case of use up the old stock first.

This is why I get so annoyed about "know all know nothings" like the AMCA issuing "value increasing authenticity certificates" without having the proper documentation to support their certificates .
Now if they certified you bike as being identical to the 19xx catalogue image that would be fine but the a-holes state that your bike is AUTHENTIC when in the case of many BSA's it is nothing like that.
Bike Beesa
Trevor

Offline Swarfcut

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Re: Plunger tool box
« Reply #20 on: 03.05. 2019 18:10 »
Adrian's Triangular Toolbox has a rather nice reinforcing bar, looks a bit modern. Almost convinced myself it came off an Enfield Bullet.

 Swarfy.

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Re: Plunger tool box
« Reply #21 on: 09.05. 2019 17:47 »
Adrian's Triangular Toolbox has a rather nice reinforcing bar, looks a bit modern. Almost convinced myself it came off an Enfield Bullet.

 Swarfy.
LIke this?

Offline Swarfcut

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Re: Plunger tool box
« Reply #22 on: 09.05. 2019 19:56 »
GB  No, that bar stops the tool roll falling out at the odd inconvenient moment when the  58% balance factor shakes the toolbox lid open. I meant that nicely shaped flat strip to reinforce the mounting holes.

  Your toolbox is luxury... Looks like deep pile carpet for the spanners' repose. Alas, that bottom is a common rust spot, as that's where the moisture collects and in production an area where paint was invariably a bit thin.

  Names for bikes? With a reg. like yours it has to be Emily.

  Someone was asking about a trusted restorer in the UK, North East Area. At the other end of the scale up there is an eBay seller who seems to have a perpetual  (never ending) stream of tasty (and expensive) stuff, I just wonder where it keeps coming from.

 Have fun come the weekend, hope the present damp spell ends pronto.

 Swarfy.

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Re: Plunger tool box
« Reply #23 on: 09.05. 2019 20:46 »
GB  No, that bar stops the tool roll falling out at the odd inconvenient moment when the  58% balance factor shakes the toolbox lid open. I meant that nicely shaped flat strip to reinforce the mounting holes.
Ah, I see.
Quote
Your toolbox is luxury... Looks like deep pile carpet for the spanners' repose. Alas, that bottom is a common rust spot, as that's where the moisture collects and in production an area where paint was invariably a bit thin.
It's dense foam. The tools are in a bag as well.
Quote
Names for bikes? With a reg. like yours it has to be Emily.
Indeed.
Quote
Have fun come the weekend, hope the present damp spell ends pronto.
Thanks fella  *smile*

Offline AdrianJ

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Re: Plunger tool box
« Reply #24 on: 12.05. 2019 10:00 »
Can't find one in the UK so I have just ordered a raw steel Indian one (B31/33)
I will let you all know how I get on.
Not expecting it for a month.
Adrian.
'53 Plunger Flash, Steib S500.