Author Topic: Cold workshop.  (Read 282 times)

Offline Swarfcut

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Re: Cold workshop.
« Reply #15 on: 29.11. 2019 10:14 »
How's about a shed in the garage?....In other words a smaller enclosed space to heat, rather than heating everything else in the garage.

 Sealing up draughts around garage doors is well worth the effort, but with our recent renovations I treated myself to a Hormann Sectional Insulated door, brand new to a bespoke size. This has rubber seals all round, and double skin insulated sections. Folks sell these off relatively cheaply when they turn a garage into an extra room, a more common  conversion these days in the UK. Sod's Law  mine was an odd size, but thanks to YouTube, fitting it myself was easy and I saved myself the best part of a grand's fitting charge. So pleased, I got a cheap second hand one in a standard size (on eBay) for £150. This is fitted at the back of the garage, so I have access straight through the garage to the back garden. Both are motorised, real impressive.

The garage door suppliers are in essence booking agents, the new door was delivered directly from Hormann's depot in Leicester. Other similar and cheaper door brands were available, but buying one from Latvia or Bulgaria with PayPal just didn't give me the same confidence.

Swarfy.

Offline cyclobutch

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Re: Cold workshop.
« Reply #16 on: 29.11. 2019 10:28 »
My garage/workshop is precast concrete, so prone to damp as well as the cold. I use a small electric fan heater out there – but the missus has had one of those meters fitted indoors and is starting to get Rsy about it. Not the way to go if you want economy it seems.
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'58 Iron Head Flash Bitza


Online Nourish

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Re: Cold workshop.
« Reply #17 on: 29.11. 2019 14:55 »
The trouble with using a heater as and when you're out there is that the air is warmed, this warm air holds water and as it meets your cold bike and tools the moisture is deposited on them. the only way then to stop that is to keep the heater set at a low temperature switched on all of the time to keep your metal items heated above the 'Dew' point.  Or of course seal up all of the gaps, insulate as much as possible and use a dehumidifier.

Online RDfella

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Re: Cold workshop.
« Reply #18 on: 29.11. 2019 16:13 »
Have a large brandy, that'll keep you warm and happy as well.
'49 B31, '49 M21, '53 DOT, '58 Flash, '00 Firestorm, Weslake sprint bike.

Offline ellis

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Re: Cold workshop.
« Reply #19 on: 29.11. 2019 19:55 »
Mmmm

Wonder what i did with my old Salamander.

ELLIS

Offline RogerSB

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Re: Cold workshop.
« Reply #20 on: 29.11. 2019 21:11 »
The trouble with using a heater as and when you're out there is that the air is warmed, this warm air holds water and as it meets your cold bike and tools the moisture is deposited on them. the only way then to stop that is to keep the heater set at a low temperature switched on all of the time to keep your metal items heated above the 'Dew' point.  Or of course seal up all of the gaps, insulate as much as possible and use a dehumidifier.

Yep! very good point, probably not worth the trouble and wait until the weather is warmer - or put up with the cold, something I've been doing for the past month, every day, while fitting my sidecar.

1960 Golden Flash