Author Topic: Log book history  (Read 161 times)

Online bikerbob

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Log book history
« on: 27.01. 2020 09:08 »
You may find this website interesting, www.buffbooks.co.uk/history. At the bottom of the history link there is a further link in red  INF 57 which gives further info and below there are further links where you can purchase replacement buff log books and tax discsetc.

Online Billybream

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Re: Log book history
« Reply #1 on: 27.01. 2020 15:58 »
Thanks for this, most interesting, just sent them an email to see if orginal log books are still available
1960 Super Rocket, owned since 1966, back on the road 2012 after being laid up for 29yrs.

Online Billybream

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Re: Log book history
« Reply #2 on: 28.01. 2020 05:36 »
Sorry got this wrong, it's not the DVLA,  but a private company offering reproduction versions of the original log books, but he did say that the DVLA might have a scanned version of the original.
Let's try it, wish me luck.
1960 Super Rocket, owned since 1966, back on the road 2012 after being laid up for 29yrs.

Offline Tomcat

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Re: Log book history
« Reply #3 on: 28.01. 2020 06:32 »
It's my understanding the Log Book stays with the motorcycle throughout its life and lists all the owners. Re registration is difficult to impossible without it?  How about a little school time for us non English folk?  *smile*
'48 A7 '59 SR '74 850 Commando TDM900

Online bikerbob

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Re: Log book history
« Reply #4 on: 28.01. 2020 08:57 »
The reason I found this website is because I have a 1956 A7 and when i bought it some years ago it came with a large file which listed all previous owners and a number of MOT's and some other info but the original buff log book had stamped on the back a change of registration number from the original number, the stamp was dated September 1988 this change of number only lasted for about a year when it was changed back to the original number and I was curious to find out why when I thought that in 1988 the buff log books were no longer valid. For that year it only did about a couple of hundred miles, I did consider writing to the owner at that time as I have names and addresses of all previous owners and the milages that they did but because it was so long ago he may not live there or may have died. I am at present the 11th owner of this bike. In the info provided with the bike was a letter from a previous owner who investigated why the first owner of the bike only kept it for 1 month it seems that when he bought it he had a heart condition and found it too heavy to manage.

Offline Swarfcut

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Re: Log book history
« Reply #5 on: 28.01. 2020 10:24 »
Tomcat,
    Yes, in the mists of time  motor vehicles were registered by the district council, the local government representative body. They issued the "Log Book" and the registration number. Each council had a particular group of letters, so you could identify where the vehicle was first registered from the number plate. You paid your road tax (originally called road fund, yes a fund for improving the roads) and they issued a tax disc which had to be displayed, so the powers that be could see the tax had been paid.   When the vehicle changed hands, the log book was updated by simply filling in the next owner, and getting the book officially stamped. As you note, the log book stayed with the vehicle, and over time in some cases suffered as all paper based things do. You would get books rumpled, crumpled, ripped, held together with Scotch tape etc.

 Eventually this system became ripe for streamlining and the new Driver and Vehicle Licencing Authority (DVLA) became the new centralised government organisation to handle UK Vehicle everythings.

 Bikerbobs post above shows the changes in more detail. Road tax became Vehicle Excise Duty (VED)

 The log books were scrapped, and replaced by a single  sheet paper vehicle registration document. Every time the vehicle was sold, the new owner got a new document. This has grown to become a multi page booklet, with tear off sections you send here and there as appropriate.....scrapping, selling to a dealer, exporting, new owner details, etc. The new owner gets a new registration document. The VED rules now mean that a change of ownership gathers two months worth of cash for the same month, as part months are not refunded, and the new period starts on the first of the month, not part way thro'. How nice is that?

 At some stage, so subtle that we hardly noticed, the DVLA  became a "Government Agency"  Then it saw itself as a money making enterprise. My guess is that someone has found the stash of returned log books and arranged for them to enter the memorabilia market.

  Genuine logbooks (and for that matter old tax discs) are worth money to certain of the lower echelons of our society, as these official documents are the key to adding value to an otherwise anonymous pile of scrap metal, if you understand my meaning.

 The DVLA gets a bad press, as they supply ownership details to almost anyone, for a fee. Particularly to anyone operating a wheel clamping parking business.

 These days the tax disc is no longer used. Authority relies on Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) to check the vehicle is street legal.  The trend is for those opting out of the system to simply use someone else's number.  So authority tightened the rules on number plate supply. Makes it a bit of a hassle proving identity at your local Halfrauds, but no problem for the real miscreants.

 As a final note, vehicles over 40 years old (on a rolling basis) can now be classed as "Historic", meaning they don't have to pay VED, and are subject to less stringent standards. In fact they are exempt from any official inspection, as I understand the rules, though lots of owners have voluntary annual test (MOT) to satisfy themselves and their insurance company that the vehicle is safe.

 Apologies for drifting a bit off topic, but now you know the basics. Dealings with the DVLA would be a section in itself!

Swarfy

Online Rex

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Re: Log book history
« Reply #6 on: 28.01. 2020 13:01 »

 Genuine logbooks (and for that matter old tax discs) are worth money to certain of the lower echelons of our society, as these official documents are the key to adding value to an otherwise anonymous pile of scrap metal, if you understand my meaning.

Swarfy

Any one trying that old scam would be very lucky to get away with it now. Those doing the inspection are wise to where the numbers should be stamped, the font of the numbers and any sign of grinding in the area. The last inspection I had the inspector checked the numbers both with a magnifying glass and the magic blue lamp. Little chance of a humble A7 becoming an RGS over night!