Author Topic: Electronic conversion  (Read 618 times)

Offline Rocket Racer

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #15 on: 30.01. 2020 02:11 »
Am I living in a parallel universe?!  *eek*
(Probably!)

Joe Hunt magneto conversions to A65 flat trackers were a very common mod as no need for a wiring loom, just a kill button
A good rider periodically checks all nuts and bolts with a spanner to see that they are tight - Instruction Manual for BSA B series, p46, para 2.
New Zealand

Offline BSA_54A10

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #16 on: 30.01. 2020 05:43 »
This was not the std hang off the side & hope you don't drop the bike Joe Hunt conversion.
It used a custom inner timing cover with a belt drive to the mag ( yes a JH one ) which sat in front of the engine like an A 10 dynamo.
In the 40 years of BSA foolery only ever saw another one like it.
Damien being a good sport, did dra a dozen or more bikes to the top of the hill so they could try a clutch start and even then more than one required a 2nd or 3rd attempt.
Bike Beesa
Trevor

Online Triton Thrasher

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #17 on: 30.01. 2020 06:38 »
Magneto, battery and coil and (most) electronic conversions are all capable of causing a spark at the plug, allowing the bike to start.

If your bike has a spark and does not start with one kick, then petrol has not reached the cylinders, or (less commonly) too much petrol has reached the cylinders. 

Online Joolstacho

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #18 on: 30.01. 2020 07:34 »
So the alternator, and battery was retained then TT? (For lighting presumably). What's the coil for if you're running a Magneto?
(Or... '90% of fuel problems are caused by electrics')
I want to see a photo of this machine!

Offline Swarfcut

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #19 on: 30.01. 2020 10:28 »
Well, the simple answer is if whatever supplies a good spark at the right time does what its supposed to do, then you ride away.  A good maggie does the job with no worries about batteries etc. I remember seeing a fire pump, some 50 years ago, powered by a Ford Sit Up and Beg E93A Sidevalve engine, with a magneto  in place of the usual distributor. Aircraft  ignition was by magneto, so in the right place with service back up  and regular maintenance they do the job, and in places where failure could be life or death. I suspect many magneto problems are down to poor maintenance, poor quality pattern parts and the obvious condenser ageing and ultimate failure. But a good magneto is certainly up to the job.

 The move to cheaper battery and coil contact breaker systems on later bikes meant a good spark at starting revs, and possible better protection from rain and damp, but the downside is the ability to maintain a well charged battery. How many had bikes that ran for years with the switch set to "Emergency?"
  For our models, add up the cost of a full magneto refurbish, and like RoyC, electronic systems become increasingly attractive.

Swarfy.

Online RDfella

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #20 on: 30.01. 2020 10:52 »
Agree with Swarfy. Fifty odd years ago it was popular to replace the distributor on petrol boat engines with a magneto (especially Ford or BMC). And they were popular for racing. Yes, the spark at low revs was weaker than that from a coil, but superior when the revs rose. On my bikes I (like many others) changed the mag/dyno for BTH racing mags as I suspect the lucas units weren't of the same quality. And don't forget how many two strokes had / have flywheel mags. I note even some modern four strokes have flywheel generated ignition.
'49 B31, '49 M21, '53 DOT, '58 Flash, '00 Firestorm, Weslake sprint bike.

Online Triton Thrasher

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #21 on: 30.01. 2020 12:05 »
Aircraft  ignition was by magneto, so in the right place with service back up  and regular maintenance they do the job, and in places where failure could be life or death.

Swarfy.

Putting a Lucas motorbike magneto on an aeroplane would be accepted in court as evidence of attempted murder.

Offline Swarfcut

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #22 on: 30.01. 2020 13:26 »
 Very true, however, whether it would actually allow take off........
  Wico-Pacy, otherwise known as  Wipac,  the scourge of Bantam owners, also fitted to Seagull outboard motors, if I recall. Well whatever it was, it sent buyers to the likes of Mariner.  Spitfires and other Merlin engined planes had twin maggys.

Swarfy.

Online RDfella

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #23 on: 30.01. 2020 14:07 »
I believe Scintilla was favourite, but there were many other makes.
'49 B31, '49 M21, '53 DOT, '58 Flash, '00 Firestorm, Weslake sprint bike.

Online cyclobutch

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #24 on: 30.01. 2020 17:33 »
It would never have done that on the magneto.

Mine will.
Various, including ...
'58 Iron Head Flash Bitza


Online Triton Thrasher

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #25 on: 30.01. 2020 17:57 »
   Spitfires and other Merlin engined planes had twin maggys.

Swarfy.

Twin magnetos were a requirement on single piston-engined passenger planes.  May still be.

I remember the pilot killing one mag to check that the engine slowed, as a pre take off check that both were working.

Online RDfella

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #26 on: 30.01. 2020 18:36 »
The Rolls-Royce Merlin had twin BTH mags, firing twin plugs per cylinder so an engine would continue firing if a plug or mag packed up.
'49 B31, '49 M21, '53 DOT, '58 Flash, '00 Firestorm, Weslake sprint bike.

Online Triton Thrasher

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #27 on: 30.01. 2020 20:15 »
The Rolls-Royce Merlin had twin BTH mags, firing twin plugs per cylinder so an engine would continue firing if a plug or mag packed up.

You don’t say!

Quote from: Swarfy
Spitfires and other Merlin engined planes had twin maggys.

Online chaterlea25

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #28 on: 30.01. 2020 20:35 »
Hi All,
Skip to the last minute of this you tube videoand see what a magneto can do *eek*
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95vU9hWWO1U

Try that with your EI

John
1961 Super Rocket
1963 RGS (ongoing)

Online ironhead

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Re: Electronic conversion
« Reply #29 on: 30.01. 2020 21:47 »
I have a suspicion the switch from maggy to coil was more to do with economics.
SA