Author Topic: Close call or the importance of cleanliness? (engine rebuild)  (Read 289 times)

Online chaterlea25

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Hi All
A current engine rebuild is an Ariel Huntmaster 650 close relation to the A10 but has a few detail differences
This bike had some work done to it not too long before it was involved in a fairly nasty accident being hit broadside by a van and written off  :( :(
A friend acquired it to provide parts for another Ariel restoration project that came with a completely seized engine
When the engine was removed I found there was 30 + thou end float on the crank so had to pull the lot to bits to rectify this.
Of course other issues were found along the way, there was no cork on the breather top hat, pistons scored badly (bored too tight) and so on.
The rods felt good and I was inclined to leave them alone until I found slugs of gunge in various places  *eek*
There was evidence that the plugs in the crank had been removed so I had assumed the oilways had been cleaned,
Nothing for it but strip everything and do it all again !!
The photo shows the timing side bearing shell all torn to crap, the drive side was better but still had embedded material. Luckily the crank is not scored so I am assuming the damage came from alloy rather than steel/iron?
Lucky escape *ex*
It just goes to show how important it is to clean every part scrupulously and then do it again when rebuilding an engine , + do the same to the oil tank

John

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Offline UKlittleguns

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Hi,

Could not agree more.  The rules are clean it, clean it again and when you think it's clean clean it again.  Once clean wrap the part in cling film until it's needed.  Assemble the engine in a clean environment, not the general workshop.  I use the kitchen table and get away with it because STMBO knows my parts are cleaner than her pots and pans!  Clean all tools used in assembly.
Wash hands and wear clean cloths.  One bit of angle dust from a mucky boiler suit will kill the job.  All sounds extreme but really doesn't take much effort.  The pay back lasts for years. *smile*
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Offline Minto

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HOne bit of angel dust from a mucky boiler suit will kill the job.  All sounds extreme but really doesn't take much effort.  The pay back lasts for years. *smile*

You really shouldn't be doing that stuff, it's very bad for your health.
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