Author Topic: Mahindra BSA  (Read 787 times)

Offline RDfella

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Re: Mahindra BSA
« Reply #30 on: 22.11. 2020 16:49 »
Thanks for the link, Angus. Interesting article that tickles a few memories.
'49 B31, '49 M21, '53 DOT, '58 Flash, '00 Firestorm, Weslake sprint bike.

Online RichardL

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Re: Mahindra BSA
« Reply #31 on: 23.11. 2020 19:25 »
Regardless of the practicality or real significance, I think it would be pretty cool if Mahindra bought this building (and adjacent nearby property, if necessary) to set up shop in the Midlands.

Richard L.
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020. This year it's a solo or pillion ride in dapper attire. Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.


Online BSA_54A10

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Re: Mahindra BSA
« Reply #32 on: 24.11. 2020 21:24 »
Regardless of the practicality or real significance, I think it would be pretty cool if Mahindra bought this building (and adjacent nearby property, if necessary) to set up shop in the Midlands.

Richard L.

But cool does not cut the mustard or pay the bills .
One of the contributing factors to the demise of BSA and the entire British motor industry for that matter, was working from inappropriate buildings which pushed the unit price of every bike way higher than it needed to be .
Allister Cave knew this which is why he was behind the push to shift all assembly from Small Heath to the new factory at Coventry and use the Small Heath solely as a parts manufacturing facility.
The buildings at Small Heath were all purpose built for making guns using natural light.
Rifles are small things so shoveling them all around the factory is no where near as expensive as shifting motorcycles around.
Finding appropriate land in the Midlands for expansion was ( and still is ) a major problem .
Jaguar bought Daimler from BSA purely & simply to acquire the land . They had no plans for the marque, they just needed the space.

There was an interesting video cross posted on the WM20 web page which outlined the movement of the motorcycles at the Plumsted works during assembly.
No wonder they made so few bikes, there would have been more workers shuffleing them within and from building to building than here was assembling bikes.
Up one floor  then down a ramp into another lift ,up to the roof to get clean access to another lift to take the bike to the basement to do a simple job then through a tunnel to the building across the road, up 3 floors, down two,  etc , etc then the finished bikes had to sit on the street .
Brad Jones makes it very clear that Slumberglades was totally inappropriate for use as a R & D headquarters due to restrictions on building new structures on the site or even modifing the existing structures due to it being a registered historical site , apparently Hesketh sufferred the same restrictions .

So no wonder all of the attempts to revive the British Motorcycle industry have failed dismally if you have to shoe horn your production facility into a building that can't accommodate it efficiently .

If Mahindra is going to make a go of it starting off with a compromised production line modified to fit within an inappropriate building already had one hand tied behind their backs.
SO if Mahindra are going to make a go of things they will need a green field site or at least one where a purpose building can be constructed .
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Trevor

Online Rex

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Re: Mahindra BSA
« Reply #33 on: 24.11. 2020 21:30 »
I think Richard was just being fanciful.....at least, I thought he was... ;)

Online metalflake11

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Re: Mahindra BSA
« Reply #34 on: 24.11. 2020 21:36 »
Slumberglade was a nice place to be chauffeur driven to though, and the works canteen had first class chefs, and a fine wine list Trevor!

I despise what Sangster did to the company!
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Online BSA_54A10

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Re: Mahindra BSA
« Reply #35 on: 24.11. 2020 22:06 »
People like to find a "monster to blame " but it was not what Sangster did .
It was what successive boards of money shufflers full of management theory and no engineering knowledge did .
Then in panic they brought out a hero to save them without realizing their hero ( Turner ) was a bufoon with a dangerous ego to boot .

It is a problem inherit to the consolidated capital method of company ownership & management .
The original board had a clear mission - To make rifles by mechanical means .
Then when there was no market for rifles,  - To use the existing skills & equipment to raise sufficient profits to pay the debts .
SO if they needed to raise more money for new equipment they would pay no ( or reduced ) dividend which they saw as an investment in future profits .
Every business they acquired in the early days , and to a lesser extent in latter days was geared towards making armaments or supplying the War Office .
Pre WWI BSA only paid 4 dividends .
As any business gets bigger the amount of funds required grows & BSA was no exception so eventually they became too big for The Midlands Bank to carry so Barclays Bank became the major financier and that meant Barclays got a seat on the board.
Because Barclays got a seat, Midlands got one as well , the money men started to replace the founders & visionaries at board level and for them, protecting the bank was more important than protecting BSA . This is common place in consolidated capital and is a clear conflict of interest .
Now the banks demanded dividends every year which is where all of the illinformed ideas about the board bleeding off all the profits for the "fat cats '' to squander came from .
Then Coopers got a seat on the board so now you have 3 money men at the helm and the course towards the rocky reef was set .

Money people are very conservative , this is why there was a stock market in the first place, because banks would not risk enough of their investors money in "risky" things like manufacturing or even farming so the risk was shifted towards the investors and away from the depositers .
Now money people work on assumptions which are usually wrong and based on history.
SO if we sold 100% last year we will sell 100% again this year and each & every year into the future .
To them all costs must be recouped so the idea of scrapping the production tooling for the C series singles in favour of the A 7 based 250 before it was paid off, was abhorrent to them as was to loss of income from supplying C series bikes for a year while they tooled up for the new model, even if the new model will cost 60% of the current model to make & sell for a higher price  while cutting the cost of the A series , to a money man, this is RISK and they are risk adverse.
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Trevor

Online metalflake11

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Re: Mahindra BSA
« Reply #36 on: 24.11. 2020 22:34 »
Yes Trevor, but apart from that it was all Sangsters fault! *smile* *smile*

You obviously know more about the latter stages of the company than I do. Suffice to say, they made a right Horlicks of it!
England N.W
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