Author Topic: Bullnose Morris  (Read 678 times)

Online Greybeard

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Bullnose Morris
« on: 28.07. 2022 13:53 »
My B-in-Law has just bought this 1923 Bullnose Morris. I drove it around his yard. The accelerator pedal is between the brake and clutch pedals. The car has only rear brakes.
Greybeard (Neil)
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A Distinguished Gentleman Riding his 1955 Plunger Golden Flash

Offline Minto

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #1 on: 28.07. 2022 23:07 »
Wow, that’s lovely. Not sure I fancy driving it on todays roads, big girls blouse that I am!!
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Online RichardL

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #2 on: 28.07. 2022 23:16 »
That's pretty cool. I take it your sister was involved.

Richard L.

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #3 on: 29.07. 2022 09:31 »
That's pretty cool. I take it your sister was involved.

Richard L.
Well, interesting that you asked that.😵 Brother-in-law, Terry, just went out and spent 13k on the car. My sister is angry because their house, which is 200 years old, needs a chimney rebuilding. They have maybe 7 other beautifully restored vintage cars. Terry has had his knees done and finds he cannot drive his previous favourite, a 1923 Austin Seven 'Chummy'. Unfortunately when the Morris arrived in his yard he found it very difficult to manoeuvre his legs around the handbrake and gear lever. The car doesn't have a door on the drivers side.
The pedals are close together. I could not drive it with my shoes on.

I reckon Terry will be under pressure to sell the car.
Greybeard (Neil)
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A Distinguished Gentleman Riding his 1955 Plunger Golden Flash

Offline RDfella

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #4 on: 29.07. 2022 12:23 »
I like old vehicles, the engineering & beauty of them, but I get less excited about veteran stuff. I find pre 30's vehicles sometimes had a crudeness about them and this vehicle is borderline for me - not overly attractive, probably not very nice to drive and certainly a bit low on power. Would I want to own it? Definitely not.
'49 B31, '49 M21, '53 DOT, '58 Flash, '62 Flash special, '00 Firestorm, Weslake sprint bike.

Online Rex

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #5 on: 29.07. 2022 13:19 »
Nice to own if you have the space and if you want to trailer it to shows etc but bloody painful to actually drive anywhere, I would think.

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #6 on: 29.07. 2022 13:36 »
I've done some of this in their cars
Greybeard (Neil)
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A Distinguished Gentleman Riding his 1955 Plunger Golden Flash

Offline muskrat

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #7 on: 29.07. 2022 20:24 »
G'day GB.
Most of the "roads" would have been like that in 1923, at least down here  *eek*
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS racer now a A10CR, '78 XT500, '83 CB1100F, 88 HD FXST, 2000 CBR929RR ex Honda Australia Superbike .
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Online KiwiGF

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #8 on: 30.07. 2022 04:46 »
Nice to own if you have the space and if you want to trailer it to shows etc but bloody painful to actually drive anywhere, I would think.

I was lucky enough to borrow this beautiful derby bentley for a days rallying around the local area, in return for me lending my B31, to it’s owner.

I’m grateful for the experience but me and my passenger/navigator were pretty glad to give the car back, we were freezing even on a 15deg C day (no heater) and its very cramped and not easy to get in and out. With heavy steering and no synchro etc (gear change next to yr right knee) its tiring, noisy and windy. It copes with loose gravel roads very well, with its big narrow wheels. Easily cruises at 100k on sealed roads in over drive.

Wearing the right gear and more practice would make things easier I guess (the owner has completed many multi day long distance rallies) but pre war open top cars are not for me (once a month we get our 1952 out, which has a heater and roof 😆).
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1949 B31 rigid “400cc”  (2nd finished project)
1968 B44 Victor Special (3rd finished project)
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Offline mikeb

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #9 on: 30.07. 2022 06:05 »
Quote
freezing...  cramped... heavy steering... no synchro... its tiring, noisy and windy.... copes with loose gravel roads very well... easily cruises at 100k on sealed roads
sounds like riding a BSA, and the sort of response from my buddies on moderns when i offer them a ride. its not a modern appliance.
i can see the appeal, but having said that, i'm not too keen on old cars with all that tin to rust, wet carpet smells and suspension bits to fall apart.
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Online Rex

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #10 on: 30.07. 2022 08:40 »
I was lucky enough to borrow this beautiful derby bentley for a days rallying around the local area, in return for me lending my B31, to it’s owner.

I would put up with a lot of discomfort to own that beauty. *smile*

Online Greybeard

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #11 on: 30.07. 2022 09:05 »
I was lucky enough to borrow this beautiful derby bentley
Lucky you! 👍
Greybeard (Neil)
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A Distinguished Gentleman Riding his 1955 Plunger Golden Flash

Offline RDfella

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #12 on: 30.07. 2022 10:08 »
Quote
With heavy steering and no synchro etc (gear change next to yr right knee) its tiring, noisy and windy.
But one knew no better in those days. Add no indicators (semaphore maybe later) iffy brakes (especially if cable) and the list goes on ....
Not that later cars were brilliant either. The Aston DB4 GT, DB5 & 6 are great looking cars, but have you tried driving one? Draughty, get wet when it rains (leaks) and don't discuss the handling on wet roads. The E type is another grossly overrated car. Not pleasant to drive and even worse to work on. We had a customer with a Series 3 Bentley Continental - what a rubbish car to drive. Or Cartier's '52 Rolls we had in (gear lever as per my Pathfinder - by right knee). No ignition key, just an army-lorry type knob and no indication as to which gear you were in. I found if I wasn't going any faster the 'answer' was just to try another gear - any one - and see if that helped. These cars may look good but are only enjoyable on the occasional short run.
'49 B31, '49 M21, '53 DOT, '58 Flash, '62 Flash special, '00 Firestorm, Weslake sprint bike.

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #13 on: 30.07. 2022 10:34 »
Quote from: KiwiGF
we were freezing even on a 15deg C day

You should try riding a motorcycle-  It’s worse!

Online KiwiGF

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Re: Bullnose Morris
« Reply #14 on: 30.07. 2022 11:54 »
All nice cars, all well out of my league.

I would like one day, maybe to own a Mk2 Cortina.

My dad had a Mk1 Estate in a Dark Green, Mk2 Estate Blue Mink, Mk 3 estate Brazil Brown.

I think he liked them.

My Hilux has a hardwood box, which I linseed oil occasionally, never. *smile*

The mk1 cortina is a very practical classic car in nz, where the roads are rarely salted  *whistle* my brother has one and its really light and nippy. Its great.

His ‘62 cortina in “survivor” condition (never resprayed, rust showing through the paint in places) is worth quite a lot more than our ‘52 semi-restored Siddeley. I guess its a more practical classic plus more people drove them in their youth.
Generally NZ is a great place to own classic cars and bikes, it’s much more affordable than the UK, with insurance not compulsory and most homes having space for a detached garage. There’s still a lot of barns containing cars (and bikes) that kiwis could not be bothered to scrap.

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1956 A10 Golden Flash  (1st finished project)
1949 B31 rigid “400cc”  (2nd finished project)
1968 B44 Victor Special (3rd finished project)
2001 GL1800 Goldwing, well, the wife likes it
2009 KTM 990 Adventure, cos it’s 100% nuts