Author Topic: How hard is it to kickstart a 650 superrocket engine rebuilt with 8.25 pistons  (Read 4117 times)

Offline brackenfel

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  • Adrian - Bristol UK
Hi Steve,
My gearbox outer was the same.. It made me decide to remove the box altogether but I appreciate that's not what you want to do right now.. When I did get the thing out, with all the nuts & screws removed I used a rubber mallet around to "persuade" the outer to separate. Most of this was done by hitting the kickstart with the mallet & then waggling to keep it square as it came off the studs..

Good luck..

Adrian
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Offline steve c

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  • 1960 A7 ( Now super rocket spec )
the generous use of stag jointing compound may have something to do with it,

the damned things glued together well its never leaked, well apart from when I used 20 50 as suggested by the haynes manual when it virtually flew out through the oilseal at the back!

I had to strip when I got as the big bearing at the back was rusted .

have taken 4 nuts 1 special nut and three allen bolts out, can't remember any hidden ones

I have been tapping it with a large hide hammer ( can't find my trusty deadblow)  and a 1/2 pound hammer and a lump of acetyl. Good belt with the deadblow tomorrow afterwork then

If the engine has to comes out I will be tempted to strip the bike and get all the gloss black metal work powder coated which I should done in the first place but for lack of cash, but would need to turn it around in a week or so to avoid loosing another summer, but would need help from my vespa nut friend John  to speed it along but would still have these problems to conquer

Steve
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Online muskrat

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G'day Steve,
                 I do feel for you, more than one problem combining to frustrate you.
Kickstart slipping is quadrant and/or pinion, which could also cause the stiffness, something amiss there.
Magy should throw a good spark even when spun by hand.
Carb, tickle and choke might be too much. try one or the other. Try a hotter plug to burn the excess oil. If you are using a b8es try a 7 or 6.
Keep trying.
Cheers
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'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
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Offline a10gf

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Just a memory from late last year (plunger a10), I used 50 oil that summer, came the autumn and some colder weather, 0% chance getting the crankshaft spinning close enough to start it. And I weigh 90kg & am a good kicker. While trying, the stress on the kick mechanism (& body mechanics) were heavy. Gave up after some attempts over a few days, was late in the season and parked it, but was on the verge of trying Mobil1 5w50 mc oil, that would have done the job.
e
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Offline beezalex

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I'm going to have to agree with Trevor and MG here.  Proper kickstarting technique is critical.  You want to use the flywheel to get the motor through compression.  This not only makes it easier to kick but also saves your kickstart quadrant.  Yes, one way to do it is to get it to compression and then push down gently until you feel the kicker starting to move again.  The other way is to put the bike in gear and roll it backward until it hits compression.  Now, A10's don't have the best kickstart ratio (they don't have the worst, either.  Ask a Velo owner) so correct technique is paramount.  The other thing you can do is introduce a longer kickstart lever.  A65 levers can be adapted and are a bit longer.
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Alex

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Offline steve c

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  • 1960 A7 ( Now super rocket spec )
Progress made (dodgy parts ride again ! ) and ignorance ! and enlightenment hopefully

A very experienced bsa owning friend rechecked the clutch which I had just assembled as it was given not expecting any more trouble. After much time with the genuinely helpful parts dealer who I had assembled it and checked with in October assembled it including rollers and all but didn?t bolt it down ( he?s pulling hair out with variable parts that won't assemble ). The original hub adapter, the new clutch sprocket, and centre and plates and SRM top plate.
I assembled it as is last week without rechecking as was pleased at the lack of wobble, Unfortunately the reason for this being was it was locked up I didn?t notice it . The new centre does not have a raised boss, the old one does which gives clearance. This locks the centre to the sprocket negating the clutch, no wonder the plates didn't separate! On the plus side you get no chain wheel wobble! Or clutch.

This is why the clutch wouldn?t separate!

We put the old solid triumph centre in and the clutch worked beautifully,
Graham taught me how to set the retard, use the tickler and air lever to start it and even with a viscously slipping kick-start pawl after two kicks it went. Ran perfectly and quietly with air lever in right place

Now fully aware that the air lever is not same as choke on a car or scooter, the reason for oiled plugs has to be fully operated to run lean enough.
The only snag with buying a seized wreck is you have never seen it running.

Stripped the box to remove the dead pawl after struggling to knock the end cast off.

Re removing gear box cover I found very good way of getting it off easily (being  a natural bodger and never giving up), with all retaining screws and nuts removed.


Take off the little inspection cover over the push rod ,  make a strap of sheet steel about 150mm long 12mm wide 1.6mm thick with two 6mm holes either end , with penny washers fit this with the two screws and hook a slide hammer through or bit of twine round a lump hammer  ( 0.5m) and it will pull of easily after a couple of swings. Will put a pic up later

Stripped the clutch and sent it all back to my supplier old and new as he wants to know what?s changed to cause the bind as he doesn?t want sell any more with a possible problem. He was very apologetic and concerned as usual unlike some others

Found some serviceable pawl and pinions in a badly corroded gearbox I had ( and was given some by my friend) so  just waiting for gaskets, locking plates and the return of the clutch to really get it running

Thanks for your interest and help.

Steve
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Online muskrat

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Good to see progress, it's all a big learning curve.
Cheers
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'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7