Author Topic: Rocker Box Stud Lengths  (Read 3305 times)

Online groily

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Re: Rocker Box Stud Lengths
« Reply #15 on: 06.09. 2010 20:50 »
With you Muskrat.
Spend a lot of time replacing (usually s/s) allen screws with (what I regard as proper - into alloy) mild steel studs and nuts with washers and lock washers. Sometimes brass is handy for the nuts (exhaust flanges on japanese bikes etc) . . .
 
There's no doubt shiny bits look better, but I hate playing with lumiweld and other salvage materials when things go pear-shaped. Which they do after a bit on any long-term-owned much messed-with beast as you imply.

Nothing more pleasing than a rusty stud/nut in my world - shows the oil's on the inside! And you get the thread lengths right for each application.

Seem to have dozens of 1/4 BSF/BSC and even BSW allen screws lying around . . . 
Dunno what sets of s/s screws cost, but I bet as much as the taps and dies to do the job once and for ever in mild. Saddens me that timing covers and primary cases don't lend themselves easily to the same thing. How many bikes have got at least one stripped thread in either or both and need silicon yuk everywhere to keep at least a proportion of the slime in?

'course, could use s/s for the nuts and washers and make them domed and shiny like on posher machines, but that wears out the tools a lot faster. And 'nyloc' or equivalent saves on washers for people who like buying nuts.

Standing by for brickbats!
Bill

Offline Rocket Racer

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Re: Rocker Box Stud Lengths
« Reply #16 on: 06.09. 2010 21:44 »
I'm not trying to convince anyone to use screws instead of studs.
On my engine though, both the timing side cases and the primary cases are all held together by coarse threaded screws:- that to me is no different to the front and rear rocker box studs which on my motor were a) stuffed and b) had already split or stripped stud hole threads - so either way there is risk of damage from over tightening/repetitive assembly.
Your call.


I would be weary of using screws in stead of studs. Every time they get screwed in, out and tightened the alloy thread will wear. Might be ok for the first  1/2 doz times, but it will happen.
Cheers.
A good rider periodically checks all nuts and bolts with a spanner to see that they are tight - Instruction Manual for BSA B series, p46, para 2.
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Online muskrat

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Re: Rocker Box Stud Lengths
« Reply #17 on: 06.09. 2010 22:18 »
No worries RR, but I may suggest helicoiling the threads if there is enough room.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
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Muskys Plunger A7

Offline Rocket Racer

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Re: Rocker Box Stud Lengths
« Reply #18 on: 07.09. 2010 02:44 »
no problem, I was also influenced in my decision by my frame to rocker box clearance or lack thereof. My rigid frame has sod all clearance for fitting the rocker box and wouldnt go on if I used studs.
removing the top rear tappet cover bolt is a shocker, probably why the factory only ever fitted the shorter A7 to the BB32R frame specials in the mid fifties.
A good rider periodically checks all nuts and bolts with a spanner to see that they are tight - Instruction Manual for BSA B series, p46, para 2.
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Offline Mosin

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Re: Rocker Box Stud Lengths
« Reply #19 on: 09.09. 2010 14:41 »
As an addendum to this thread, I discovered what the problem was. A previous owner had obviously not had the two extended nuts required for the rear two studs and as a solution had made up a pair of extended studs which were nearly 2 1/2" long and reached right through the head so that conventional nust could be used instead. These obviously gripped far less of the thread on the stud than the longer nuts which is probably what had led to the threads stripping. Once I discovered this, I ordered the correct nuts (and their thicker washers) from Draganfly. Incidentally, when these arrived, the external diameter of them was too great to pass through the holes in the head and I was required to roll them around on the bench grinder a bit to make them fit snugly. I then fitted my four new identical studs (part no 67-1117) and the whole thing has bolted down like a dream with new gaskets and the slightest smear of sealer. I've covered about 15 miles on it this morning and there is no sign of any oil leaking at all so I'm pretty chuffed!
1960 A7 Shooting Star
1959 D3 Bantam
1994 Triumph Trident 900

North West England

Online RichardL

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Re: Rocker Box Stud Lengths
« Reply #20 on: 09.09. 2010 14:44 »
I take it "chuffed" is a good thing?
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Offline Mosin

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Re: Rocker Box Stud Lengths
« Reply #21 on: 09.09. 2010 14:47 »
I take it "chuffed" is a good thing?

It certainly is!
1960 A7 Shooting Star
1959 D3 Bantam
1994 Triumph Trident 900

North West England