Author Topic: Repairing The Butchers work  (Read 1311 times)

Offline Roadrocket649

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Repairing The Butchers work
« on: 13.01. 2011 08:03 »
Hi Guys

BSA Super Rocket 1958

One of the previous owners prefered a hammer & chisel to a spanner on this machine
On the rear wheel, the chisel cut is half way through the sprocket side NUT, so I was going to have made,

1.  A new spindle made in stainless steel
2.  A new new nut cut for the sprocket side, also in stainless

Then the thought struck, were these originally made in mild steel, or high tensile steel.

I would appreciate your views on this issue, and whether staineless a good or bad idea

Roadrocket


Offline LJ.

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #1 on: 13.01. 2011 10:10 »
Oh! I know just what you mean by the 'hammer & chisel' effects and this doe's annoy me. Stilson wenches are also a pet hate of mine. But I'll own up to having done just that on that horrible cush nut, it is so badly knurled over now that an SRM modified replacement is a must. You just can't beat the proper tools for the proper job.

As far as stainless steel goes for the rear end as you mention, I can't see any problem, but then I'm not a metallurgist. Hopefully someone will give you a better opinion.
Ride Safely Lads! LJ.
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1940 BSA M20 500cc Girder/Rigid- (SOLD)
1947 BSA M21 600cc Girder/Rigid-Green
1949 BSA A7   500cc Girder/Plunger Star Twin-(SOLD)
1953 BSA B33  500cc Teles/Plunger-Maroon
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Online muskrat

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #2 on: 13.01. 2011 11:03 »
G'day Roadrocket,
                        try Barleycorn.com for a ss spindle & nut. Some people say no to ss spindles but I'm going to try a set.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7

Offline Roadrocket649

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #3 on: 13.01. 2011 11:08 »
Hi Muskrat

Why do they say no to Stanless Steel?

Offline BSA_54A10

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #4 on: 13.01. 2011 11:18 »
Lower tensile & shear strengths
A poor understanding of engineering.
Rapid fire cannon barrels are made from the same alloy with 0.05% Va % & 0.1% Ti
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Trevor

Offline Roadrocket649

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #5 on: 13.01. 2011 11:27 »
So is the original steel spindle - just mild steel or high tensile?

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #6 on: 13.01. 2011 11:48 »
G'day Trevor,
                  so if I keep an eye on nut tension and don't jump tall buildings all should be good.
Did BSA make those cannon barrels ?
Not sure Roadrocket, if I had to make a set it would be HT.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
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Online Triton Thrasher

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #7 on: 13.01. 2011 12:18 »

Rapid fire cannon barrels are made from the same alloy with 0.05% Va % & 0.1% Ti

But they're thicker.

Offline lawnmowerman

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #8 on: 13.01. 2011 12:19 »
I am not an expert on metallurgy but I have read earlier posts which advise that the nut and spindle are made from different grades of stainless to avoid them "welding" themselves together over time. Also it is vital to use an anti seize product when assembling to avoid this effect as the heat produced in tightening accelerates this effect.
Personally I would avoid it on a rear wheel spindle as the last thing you want is a seized nut by the roadside on a wet and windy night when you are trying to fix a flat.
Jim
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Offline andy2565

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #9 on: 13.01. 2011 12:43 »
wheel spindles are generaly made from en16 grade,which is much harder than mild steel,i'm never been a stainless person,we would never use stainless spokes etc on our race bikes,its just for bling,keep it the original steel parts for the major parts,i guess its ok for the small parts and the instrument panels,
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Online Butch (cb)

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #10 on: 13.01. 2011 12:45 »
If you have the parts in your hand you should be able to tell if it's high tensile - it will chime and file differently.
Warning - observations made by this member have a 93% unreliability rating.

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Offline trickytree

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #11 on: 13.01. 2011 17:53 »
EN16t for spindles.
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A10 Bitza project

Offline Roadrocket649

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #12 on: 13.01. 2011 18:26 »
Thanks Guys

Roadrocket

Offline Stu55Flash

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #13 on: 13.01. 2011 21:02 »
Don't know what their made of, but if you look at the BSA film on another thread the wheel spindles look to be forged ('upset') not turned. I'm no expert but are the replacement stainless items forged or just turned? From the adverts they look to be turned not forged. BSA must have forged them for a reason i.e. strength.

Stu
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Offline BSA_54A10

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Re: Repairing The Butchers work
« Reply #14 on: 14.01. 2011 12:08 »
Contary to popular belief the axle need not be particularly strong and only needs sufficient tensile strength to hold the kit & caboodle together which you could do quite well with a 1/4" standard bolt.
However it dose need to be rigid to the nth degree, hence the forging.
Forging is cheaper than machining if you produce enough to amortize the cost of the die
I have seen race bikes with axels made from tube to reduce the unsprung weight
Bike Beesa
Trevor