Author Topic: Brakes  (Read 6127 times)

Offline tombeau

  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Aug 2008
  • Posts: 678
  • Karma: 6
Re: Brakes
« Reply #15 on: 30.09. 2009 07:22 »
That I'd like to see.
Iain
Good Advice
0
No reactions

Online bsa-bill

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2006
  • Posts: 5512
  • Karma: 64
Re: Brakes
« Reply #16 on: 30.09. 2009 16:56 »
I've seen this done on a Bantam, mind you the owner had put a Boneville engine in it  *respect*
Sorry getting way off A10's here.

All the best - Bill
Good Advice
0
No reactions
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Offline MikeN

  • A's Best Friend
  • ***
  • Join Date: Mar 2009
  • Posts: 220
  • Karma: 1
Re: Brakes
« Reply #17 on: 30.09. 2009 18:01 »
I am always surprised at how many people dont set up their brake  levers correctly.If you look at "Snowbeards Spitfire" under "Finest Pictures" you can see that he has got his brake lever angle just right. It should be how he has it, with the brake cable forming an angle of approx 75-80Deg. so that when it is applied it pulls up to nearly 90 degrees where you will obtain maximum leverage.
  So often you see freshly renovated bikes set up with an angle of about 100 deg or more ,before the lever has even been pulled!
  I can only think owners have done this because they havent sought out or made a correct cable.
Same applys at the back wheel of course.
Mike
Good Advice
0
No reactions

Offline Rocket Racer

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Jun 2009
  • Posts: 1457
  • Karma: 16
  • A kiwi with a racing A10 rig and too many projects
    • NZ Classic Sidecar Racing
Re: Brakes
« Reply #18 on: 30.09. 2009 22:36 »
If you take a look at the pictures of the A7 shooting star rigid race bikes being prepared for daytona (should we mention that out performed goldstars in that event... no better not) Roland Pike had revised the brake plate to run the lever facing forward to improve braking. Like lever angle, another factor is that the brake fulcrum on the outside of the radius lifts the shoe the same distance but on a different radius to the inner lift of the fulcrum, so the shoes are actually not pressed against the drum with the same pressure. 
These days half the battle is finding good pad materials as the common bonded grey shit is designed for hydraulic application not cable operated bikes. On my last race bike that had the 8" tls from the late sixties I could lock up the front end of my side car if required, mind you the smaller 16" rim also improves braking force
Good Advice
0
No reactions
A good rider periodically checks all nuts and bolts with a spanner to see that they are tight - Instruction Manual for BSA B series, p46, para 2.
New Zealand

Offline minibsa

  • Moving Up
  • **
  • Join Date: Aug 2009
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 0
  • MINIBSA BRISBANE AUSTRALIA
Re: Brakes
« Reply #19 on: 04.10. 2009 08:11 »
   With those cams, from my recollection you will probably find that one (the bigger one) is 60 on,which pulls from the bottom of the brake plate, and the other is pre 60, which pulls from the top.
Cheers,   Bob.
 
Good Advice
0
No reactions

Online Joolstacho

  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2010
  • Posts: 545
  • Karma: 4
Re: Brakes
« Reply #20 on: 30.01. 2010 10:40 »
Can anyone describe the procedure for machining brake shoes on the brakeplate?
I want to do 69 TLS type. Obviously you'd centre them, then chuck up the axle? -but how do you stop the shoes shifting (floating) when you caress 'em with the tool?

Also, any more ideas on linings? I found AM4 green linings a bit 'grabby' on my Velo Clubman SLS front (V. good brake though for an SLS)

-Jools
Good Advice
0
No reactions

Offline MikeN

  • A's Best Friend
  • ***
  • Join Date: Mar 2009
  • Posts: 220
  • Karma: 1
Re: Brakes
« Reply #21 on: 30.01. 2010 19:11 »
Can anyone describe the procedure for machining brake shoes on the brakeplate?
I want to do 69 TLS type. Obviously you'd centre them, then chuck up the axle? -but how do you stop the shoes shifting (floating) when you caress 'em with the tool?

Also, any more ideas on linings? I found AM4 green linings a bit 'grabby' on my Velo Clubman SLS front (V. good brake though for an SLS)

-Jools

Jools,

I dont bother with the axle bit .This is what i do . On your lathe , chuck a short length of (say ) dia.1 1/2" alloy or steel and turn a spigot so that the brake plate locates snug on it . Get a similar peice of material (only needs to be about 1 " long) which you have previously faced off both ends and centred one end deeply.
  With the back plate located on the spigot the other part becomes a pressure pad which you do up hard against the other side of your b/plate with the tailstock and a revolving center.This should  get your brake plate revolving truly and impart drive  .
  Most plates ive done have had a round fixed fulcrum which locates the shoes positively .Im not sure about the 2LS type but I would think that if you replaced the springs with lockwire and do them up tight ,all will be well .
  I use a brazed tip tungsten carbide tool as I find that the brake friction material wears out a HSS tool in no time .Use a slowish speed,try 150 rpm . Remember to add a shim under the cam end of each shoe.Turn the shoes to be as good a fit as possible in the hub with minimum clearance.
   Removing  the shim you will give you  the correct clearance . A short peice of hacksaw blade (with the kerf ground off) seems about right.
  PLEASE use some form of local extraction if you think the linings contain asbestos.
Mike
Good Advice
0
No reactions

Online Joolstacho

  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2010
  • Posts: 545
  • Karma: 4
Re: Brakes
« Reply #22 on: 31.01. 2010 11:04 »
Mike that's a great help, now I get it! thanks.

-Jools
Good Advice
0
No reactions