Author Topic: steering damper locating pin  (Read 686 times)

Offline taroha10

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steering damper locating pin
« on: 20.03. 2011 09:35 »
Morning all.
I was just reading a post from a new member who commented on having just the Haynes manual for reference.
Generally I have found it good but I got to thinking of small things they may have missed.
When I got my first A10 as a rusty basket case many years ago, the frame and wheels had been sitting uncovered outside for quite some time.
When taking the front end to pieces ,the steering damper knob was seized.As this was the first thing to remove I tried just a little too much force and it snapped ,only to reveal a little brass pin that held the knob on the shaft.
I,m not expecting the Haynes to have known this but it was not mentioned so I broke the knob.
I have seen after market ones since that didn't have a pin but just incase someone reading this has a siezed damper and has used up 3 tins of WD40 to no avail ,have a look for that pin! nOnce it is removed, the rest will hopefully tap through the steering head.
I hope this may be of help to someone.
Cheers. Mark.

Offline pato08

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Re: steering damper locating pin
« Reply #1 on: 20.03. 2011 19:07 »
Thank You, Information safely filed away in what is left of my brain for future reference

Pato
1957 Plunger, one of the very rare collector's items ;-)
Australia

Offline taroha10

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Re: steering damper locating pin
« Reply #2 on: 21.03. 2011 23:48 »
Hi again.
I got to thinking about what I had posted and just in case it wasn't clear,I think the knob still has its own screw thread after the pin is removed.My rod had seized at the bottom end and the force of me trying to unscrew it broke the knob.I never got to find out if the thread in the knob had seized or not.
Cheers again. Mark.