Author Topic: Fixing the bike at the roadside using barbed wire....  (Read 792 times)

Offline t20racerman

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Hi all

Haven't posted on the forum for a while (have been, searched, read and cleared off with answers regularly enough though), so thought I'd share my latest bit of BSA related excitement...

Me and a couple of mates decided to do a tour of S Wales and so last week, we set off from my mates house in the Midlands for a 400 mile rideout. Great breakfast after about 100 miles, but then 30 miles later the BSa went pop-bang-pop-pop and ground to a halt.  *sad2*

I thought the mag had gone kaput, or more likely the fibre gear had broken up, or slipped. After a bit of research at the roadside the fault was found - the rivet holding the points together had failed. So, could we fix it - you bet we could! The fence the bike was leaning against had barbed wire at the top, so we unfurled a barb, cut it to length and made a Z shaped bit to replace the rivet, and put it in as tight as we could with pliers to hold it all together. It was a bit of a bodge, but I hoped it would work to get us out from the middle of nowhere to a town or village where I could phone the recovery services and get picked up....


Anyway, kicked the bike over and it fired up and ran lovely. Ran it carefully for 5-6 mins to check all was OK, then back to thrashing it round the lanes! Managed to ride another 270 miles with it like that, getting home after 14 hours out and about. Fantastic day, and one of the attached pics shows the lovely Elan Valley that we rode through.

I'm sure we've all bodged our bikes to get home now and again, but this one really saved the day.  *smile*

Have fun out there!
Adrian
1961 A10 - somewhat modified :-)
1980 TZ350 - lunatic Classic Race machine
1967 T20 Suzuki - heavily modified Classic Racer
1967 T20 Suzuki - pretty standard road bike
2007 KTM 660 SMC - fast and furious supermoto
Triumph 675 Speed triple
Ossa 250 and yet another T20 racer in bits both being built up

"If I had all the money back that I've spent on motorcycles... I'd spend it all on motorcycles!"

Online muskrat

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Re: Fixing the bike at the roadside using barbed wire....
« Reply #1 on: 01.09. 2012 14:16 »
 Good one Adrian. You would fit right in here in Oz with bodge skills like that. *work* *yeah*
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR, '76 XT500, '77 AG175 '83 CB1100F, '81 CB900F project.
Australia
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Online duTch

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Re: Fixing the bike at the roadside using barbed wire....
« Reply #2 on: 02.09. 2012 13:10 »
You were lucky there Adrian, usually there's bits of wire and general emergency fix-ups lying around- until you need it..!
   Mind you I can't imagine Musky finding somewhere to plug in that grinder that fits in with current 'work-safe practice'..? *smile*
 Not to say it can't be done *smile* *smile* (barbed wire to the overheads??)
cheers'
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
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Offline cotterpinkid

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Re: Fixing the bike at the roadside using barbed wire....
« Reply #3 on: 03.09. 2012 20:10 »
Nice one Adrian. I also spent a couple days in Wales in June on my Velocette. Like yourself I ran into trouble (with my engine shock absorber) and had to make use of fence wire - neccessity is the mother of invention.

Brian
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Offline pedrochapala

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Re: Fixing the bike at the roadside using barbed wire....
« Reply #4 on: 11.10. 2012 23:41 »
Hi all

Haven't posted on the forum for a while (have been, searched, read and cleared off with answers regularly enough though), so thought I'd share my latest bit of BSA related excitement...

Me and a couple of mates decided to do a tour of S Wales and so last week, we set off from my mates house in the Midlands for a 400 mile rideout. Great breakfast after about 100 miles, but then 30 miles later the BSa went pop-bang-pop-pop and ground to a halt.  *sad2*

I thought the mag had gone kaput, or more likely the fibre gear had broken up, or slipped. After a bit of research at the roadside the fault was found - the rivet holding the points together had failed. So, could we fix it - you bet we could! The fence the bike was leaning against had barbed wire at the top, so we unfurled a barb, cut it to length and made a Z shaped bit to replace the rivet, and put it in as tight as we could with pliers to hold it all together. It was a bit of a bodge, but I hoped it would work to get us out from the middle of nowhere to a town or village where I could phone the recovery services and get picked up....


Anyway, kicked the bike over and it fired up and ran lovely. Ran it carefully for 5-6 mins to check all was OK, then back to thrashing it round the lanes! Managed to ride another 270 miles with it like that, getting home after 14 hours out and about. Fantastic day, and one of the attached pics shows the lovely Elan Valley that we rode through.

I'm sure we've all bodged our bikes to get home now and again, but this one really saved the day.  *smile*

Have fun out there!
Adrian

the sign of a true mechanic amigo! always carry some baling wire in yer bag i say!

Offline LJ.

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Re: Fixing the bike at the roadside using barbed wire....
« Reply #5 on: 13.10. 2012 13:47 »
... and this is what I find so satisfying about these older machines, that we are able to fix them when a problem arises. Something you cannot often do with  more modern machines. It always feels good having done something like this.
Ride Safely Lads! LJ.
**********************
1940 BSA M20 500cc Girder/Rigid- (SOLD)
1947 BSA M21 600cc Girder/Rigid-Green
1949 BSA A7   500cc Girder/Plunger Star Twin-(SOLD)
1953 BSA B33  500cc Teles/Plunger-Maroon
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Blue
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Red