Author Topic: Weight  (Read 1398 times)

Online Gavin

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Weight
« on: 17.09. 2012 15:34 »
Anyone know the weight (Approx) of a 51 plunger A10? Family want to buy a lift for the bike,  and so need some idea of what weight it will be required to raise. Thanks.

Offline Stephen Foster

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Re: Weight
« Reply #1 on: 17.09. 2012 16:06 »
425 lbs according to a specification pamphlet I own ..think the plunger model is slightly lighter ?

Steve ...
I own a 1955/56 B.S.A Swinging Arm "Golden Flash" , had it since 1976 .

Online muskrat

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Re: Weight
« Reply #2 on: 17.09. 2012 20:53 »
 Yep about 185kg or 400lb. I got a 300kg one, lifts my Rhonda Whore but struggles with HD's.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7

Online Gavin

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Re: Weight
« Reply #3 on: 18.09. 2012 01:50 »
Thanks that helps brilliantly.

Offline Butch (cb)

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Re: Weight
« Reply #4 on: 20.09. 2012 19:03 »
Hmmmm. I was making that choice a few years ago. Figured that I'd at least never have somethinh like a HD on it, but ultimately picked the heavier duty one anyone. I must have had a Harley up on there within 6 weeks of purchase. Seemed like a luxury buy at the time, turned into essential kit within weeks. 
Warning - observations made by this member have a 93% unreliability rating.

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'58 Iron Head Flash Bitza


Offline renos-a10

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Re: Weight
« Reply #5 on: 21.09. 2012 13:54 »
BSA's 650cc A10 enjoyed a reputation as an all-rounder and ideal sports machine, tourer, and sidecar hauler.
BSA's 500cc A7 twin was increased to 650cc in response to the US customer's desire for "more cubes."         
After 12 years the A10 was replaced by the A65. The change was not driven by BSA's desire to improve         
 the aging A10 design, but rather by supplier Lucas Electric's decision to stop production of magnetos          
as used in the A10 in favour of alternators.         
         
Here is an interesting comparison. Look at the specs of the BSA A10 Golden Flash above and contrast          
them with my Kawasaki Ninja 650R. Both have 650cc engines.         
         
         
1953 BSA A10 Golden Flash         
Engine type: Parallel twin, overhead valve         
Bore and Stroke: 70mm x 84mm         
Horsepower: 35 at 4500rpm         
Weight: 440lb ( 200kg )         
1954 BSA A10 Plunger
Cyprus

Offline duTch

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Re: Weight
« Reply #6 on: 21.09. 2012 16:36 »
 That's a road case, pushed a few of them too.
 Hey  Gav, I was wrong in my earlier estimate too, I think I said ~64 kg?(dunno where I got that), Well I weighed mine again the other day and complete with Maggie, Gennie and gearbox no clutch, came in at 66kg, so take off ~15,(3+3+9=15) motor should be about 50kg..?


   Edit- Why did I post this here, as well as where it should be?
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
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Online Triton Thrasher

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Re: Weight
« Reply #7 on: 21.09. 2012 22:47 »
After 12 years the A10 was replaced by the A65. The change was not driven by BSA's desire to improve         
 the aging A10 design, but rather by supplier Lucas Electric's decision to stop production of magnetos          
as used in the A10 in favour of alternators.         
         

That doesn't sound right to me. There were A10s with alternators. Points housings that fitted in place of the magneto were available.

Quote
Here is an interesting comparison. Look at the specs of the BSA A10 Golden Flash above and contrast          
them with my Kawasaki Ninja 650R. Both have 650cc engines.         
         
         
1953 BSA A10 Golden Flash         
Engine type: Parallel twin, overhead valve         
Bore and Stroke: 70mm x 84mm         
Horsepower: 35 at 4500rpm         
Weight: 440lb ( 200kg )         


What are we supposed to compare that list with?

Offline BSA_54A10

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Re: Weight
« Reply #8 on: 22.09. 2012 12:51 »
Quote
That doesn't sound right to me. There were A10s with alternators. Points housings that fitted in place of the magneto were available.

Yes there was a distributor in place of the magneto model and also an alternator, Dynamo + magneto model.

The stator of the alternator A 10 mounts onto the chaincase cover and is a right royal bastard to fit properly and while it could be done in small numbers it was not viable as a regular production machine.
Every author attributes the unit engine development to the phasing out of magnetos.
Add to that the unit engines would be a lot cheaper to build and we all know just how price sensitive the motorcycle market was.
Post WWII BSA never did any thing unless it had to and the board would rather have been castrated than spend money on new tooling.
Just look at reception the comp shop got for the 250cc based on 1/2 an A 7.
Faster , cheaper and much more robust than the C series but got canned because " tooling costs would never be recovered & we are selling all of the C series we can make"
Bike Beesa
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Offline boog

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Re: Weight
« Reply #9 on: 01.10. 2012 23:41 »
im a noob with beezers but it would make sense that the A-10 was replaced because of the stroke length.long stroke gives the low end pulling power but in search of more horsepower bsa felt that a more balanced bore/stroke was the way to go?

Offline renos-a10

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Re: Weight
« Reply #10 on: 02.10. 2012 07:57 »
BSA's 650cc A10 enjoyed a reputation as an all-rounder and ideal sports machine, tourer, and sidecar hauler.
BSA's 500cc A7 twin was increased to 650cc in response to the US customer's desire for "more cubes."   
After 12 years the A10 was replaced by the A65. The change was not driven by BSA's desire to improve   
 the aging A10 design, but rather by supplier Lucas Electric's decision to stop production of magnetos    
as used in the A10 in favour of alternators.   
   
Here is an interesting comparison. Look at the specs of the BSA A10 Golden Flash above and contrast    
them with my Kawasaki Ninja 650R. Both have 650cc engines.   
   
   
1953 BSA A10 Golden Flash   
Engine type: Parallel twin, overhead valve   
Bore and Stroke: 70mm x 84mm   
Horsepower: 35 at 4500rpm   
Weight: 440lb ( 200kg )   
   
   
2006 Kawasaki Ninja 650 R   
Engine type: Parallel twin, overhead cam   
Bore and stroke: 83mm x 60mm   
Horsepower: 62.1 at 9,000 rpm   
Weight: 393 lb ( 189,30kg )   
1954 BSA A10 Plunger
Cyprus