Author Topic: tank liner  (Read 2131 times)

Offline a101960

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tank liner
« on: 26.07. 2013 07:40 »
Problem solved. I went to have a look to see if I could find anything that was causing the slide to stick. It is efinol. The slide was covered in a horrible tacky varnish like substance, as was the needle and jet. My mate then told me that over the winter he had had the tank lined. Oh dear!

John

Offline wilko

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tank liner
« Reply #1 on: 27.07. 2013 00:32 »
I'll never understand why people keep lining their tanks when they don't leak?

Online bsa-bill

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tank liner
« Reply #2 on: 27.07. 2013 11:27 »
[quoteI'll never understand why people keep lining their tanks when they don't leak?][/quote]

Oops wilko - I'm guilty as charged, lined it due to it getting rusty inside while waiting for the rest of the bike to get put together, it's an Indian tank I should have filled it with something when I put it away in the shed, thought the powdery rust would cause problems so sealed it with an Ethanol proof liner, I think I could  remove it (might peel off) someday if it causes problems but so far it's good.
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Online Triton Thrasher

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tank liner
« Reply #3 on: 27.07. 2013 11:48 »
I'll never understand why people keep lining their tanks when they don't leak?

Because it's something they can buy for their bike and the adverts say it's a great thing to do.

Offline Lord Flashheart

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tank liner
« Reply #4 on: 31.07. 2013 13:34 »
OK ,      Apol's if this is getting off topic, but -------
The perceived wisdom on tank lining seems to be, -don't do it !

I have a spare tank which I intend to get re-finished in the near future. This tank has stood (outdoors) for a long period with ethanol fuel, has absorbed water, and consequently has much orange sludge and 'crusty' areas in the lower levels. 

For the sake of clarity, are we saying do NOT use liners (even the ones claiming to be 'proof') when fuels containing ethanol are used, due to risk of liner break-down gumming-up the carb. ? I can see that this might be more difficult to deal with than rust in the filter and /or jets.

What then does our experience tell us about using only the de-rusting pre-treatments that come with the liner ?  My industrial metal-finishing experience suggests that etching the surface, to clean and promote adhesion, may be opening up another 'can of worms' ?

Do two stroke tanks suffer the same problems ?  I have heard it said that a small shot of oil in the tank once in a while may hold back corrosion, whether this is true i'm not sure but a bit of 'Castrol R' would sure spice things up a bit.  *smile*
Your views gents,;
Pete.
Flash'

Live for today, but don't regret it tomorrow !

'59 G.Flash-S.Rocket Motor; '88 Honda Hawk 650 (Project); BMW1100RT; '04 HondaVFR800.

Online bsa-bill

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tank liner
« Reply #5 on: 31.07. 2013 14:56 »
Quote
de-rusting pre-treatments that come with the liner ?

I found it a bit like painting the Forth Bridge, treat the rust, wash with water, result more rust, probably if I could have got it dry quickly somehow (an oven - but the paint?) would have been good but the shape of the tank perverted thorough drying even with a hotair gun
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Offline chaz

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tank liner
« Reply #6 on: 01.08. 2013 12:36 »
tank treating... you ask
its all down to expense..
treat the tank for £20 or pay £250 for another simples.

we get customers in on modern superbikes dont want to pay for new tanks so they are lined, we get customers with classics, dont mind spending £1000 on a engine rebuild but dont want a new tank because of availability/manufacture/cost/its still useable.

My Laverda tank was religious, (holy) , without a lot of welding not really useable. no remanufactured about, second hand I paid £250 from Holland and needs a spray. someone aoofered another with dents they would fill and spray for £450. what options? I paid the £250 and have a solid, albiet the wrong colour and a couple of dings, tank now as for my old one coating would not fill the holes but once welded you would have to coat it just to seal. but I might cover the cost.

Now the A10, I used Kreem on and it got too hot, crazed the paint and a bit I spilled on the outside marked it. they dont tell you to use the protective coating on the outside before you do the job. what makes it worse is the treatment comes in a sealed pack of 3 bottles, the protective is a seperate order!!
the Petseal Ive usd in the past , Ive yet to hear of any problems!!

Ethanol should be branded as a paint stripper, seems to affetc bikes more than cars due to the lower mileage and storage we do.
allways willing to learn
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Offline muskrat

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #7 on: 02.08. 2013 14:10 »
I have used both KBS and Por15. The only "come back" was with a HD tank that flexed a bit when the mounts were over tightened. The KBS cracked.
To remove coatings use 250 ml of good quality paint stripper left in for a few days/week. May take a few go's, but it will work.
Extreme care to protect the outside paintwork. I wrap tank in a few layers of gladwrap (clingwrap), cut out filler hole and use gaffer tape around the neck.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR, '76 XT500, '77 AG175 '83 CB1100F, '81 CB900F project.
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Muskys Plunger A7

Offline chaterlea25

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #8 on: 02.08. 2013 17:05 »
Hi All

"
Extreme care to protect the outside paintwork. I wrap tank in a few layers of gladwrap (clingwrap), cut out filler hole and use gaffer tape around the neck."

Unless theres a pinhole or worse anywhere in the tank which then leaves you having to fork out for a paintjob aswell *angry* *angry* *angry* *angry*
Dont ask how I know  *eek* *eek* *eek*

John
1961 Super Rocket
1963 RGS (ongoing)

Offline wilko

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #9 on: 03.08. 2013 01:25 »
Just solder any leaks. Been doing it for years.

Offline Sparky

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #10 on: 20.10. 2013 17:29 »
Since fuel tank sealers are obviously designed to seal tanks containing "fuel", is it the belief that it is the ethanol content in the gas that is causing the problem rather than the petrolium distillates themselves?  I was wondering if anyone been able to avoid gumming up the carburetor by using ethanol-free gas in a tank with a liner.  I have discovered a local supplier of E0 93 (and 100) octane gas, and thought I would give it a try.  The slightly higher cost would be well worth it to avoid tearing down the carburetor again.

Offline muskrat

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #11 on: 20.10. 2013 20:01 »
G'day Sparky. Yes it's the ethanol that's causing the problem. I coated my '51's tank some 15 years ago with the old Kreem tank liner. It's still in there sealing the leak. I never ever use fuel containing any ethanol in any of my bikes. The Kreem will dissolve if it comes within a mile of ethanol.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR, '76 XT500, '77 AG175 '83 CB1100F, '81 CB900F project.
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7

Offline duTch

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #12 on: 20.10. 2013 22:36 »

 I sealed over a small hole and a minor leakage with Devcon 'Liquid Steel'...(must've used a different brand for something else in the past), seems to work ok after a couple of years.

  My local 'old bike' shop BJ's sells stuff called Red-Cote, reckons it works good, single tin application, dilute with acetone and pour in enough to coat the entire surface (?) brochure says it's Methanol 'resistant', but can't find a mention of Ethanol.
 Dissolves with acetone, and tank can apparently be retreated easily by just adding another coating...??

 I am not endorsing it and haven't used it, until I know more about it or till absolute necessary..

   http://damonq.com/Red-Kote.html

  cheers
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
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Offline Sparky

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #13 on: 21.10. 2013 01:44 »
Thanks for the confirmation, Muskrat.  It gives me hope that with the right fuel, I won't have to try and strip out the liner.

The product in my tank is, in fact, Red Kote.  After restarting the bike after it sat idle for three months over the summer (sounds crazy but here in the Southwest desert, it's too dang hot to ride in the summer!), the engine was rough and wouldn't idle.  I pulled the carb, and found tacky varnish everywhere.  I drained the tank, and the fuel was red, so obviously the liner was being effected by the fuel.  We have 10% ethanol fuel, and it probably didn't help sitting in a really hot garage for those months, but I'm here to tell you that Red Kote is NOT impervious to ethanol.  I am planning to add some ethanol-free fuel to the tank and then draining it out after a few weeks.  If it's clear, put it in gear; if it's red, oh dread!

Offline duTch

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #14 on: 21.10. 2013 07:56 »


 good stuff Sparky, thanks for the feedback, so how long has the Red-Kote been in there ?
Be good to know the difference after using e-free fuel for a while ?
 It seems that if you need to remove it, just add acetone which will dissolve it, and drain(maybe easier said than done)

 good luck

 Just out of curiosity, when you say ' desert, hot, southwest'...is that like Roadrunner/Coyote/Highway 69 country...with those funny hills that go straight up (mesas? Pesos?), and Rattlesnakes..and sidewinders.??
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
Australia