Author Topic: tank liner  (Read 2230 times)

Online muskrat

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #15 on: 21.10. 2013 09:39 »
G'day Sparky.
Red Coat says " A partial list of additives that Red-Kote is resistant to includes ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, toluene, methyl tertiary butyl ether, isopropyl alcohol and tetraethyl lead."
I spose resistant isn't impervious.
Yep try some ethanol free fuel.
Cheers
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Offline Sparky

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #16 on: 21.10. 2013 14:17 »
The Red Kote was allowed to dry for at least 9 months while I worked on other items, and then had E10 fuel sitting in it for about a year before I noticed the problems, so in fairness to their advertising, I guess I could say it is "resistant".  Had I been riding more regularly, perhaps the turnover of fuel in the tank would have reduced the leeching out of whatever it is in the liner that the ethanol attacks.  I will definitely report on my experience with E0 gas.

The Roadrunner/Coyote landscape is actually stylized from northern Arizona and southern Utah, but in fact the big saguaro cactus you see in the cartoon only lives in southern Arizona (where I am) and northern Mexico, so they took a bit of artistic license.  Mesa is the term for those flat top mountains (it means "table" in Spanish).  And yes, we also have rattlesnakes and scorpions.  Here is a picture of a real roadrunner who got into an addition we were putting on the house... 

Offline duTch

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #17 on: 21.10. 2013 15:14 »

 Yahoo, a real live (I hope) Roady Runner, and a friend whose brother lives in Californi.. had a Woodpecker come knock knock knockin on his door the other day....just enough cartoonery for the week, next thing we'll have - whoops sorry, gettin' off track...

  Thanks Sparks, Will stay tuned for further updates, save to say-  'Resistant' can be fairly open for interpretation......
 Musky:- possibly splitting hairs, but is that 'A partial list of additives that Red-Kote is resistant to', or 'A list of additives that Red-Kote is partially resistant to.'...?

  on a slight aside, I fuelled up just now, and noted an absence of e-fuel(ent), at the servo I go to, normally I use BP Ultimate98, but as an experiment figured I'd try 91 and see, but that's probably fuel for a different topic......!!
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
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Online bsa-bill

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #18 on: 21.10. 2013 18:11 »
 this may seem a bit naive but is Red-kote red.
My tank was chromed and painted about 13 years ago and lined with red stuff, I've had no problems at all with it and E (there's not ours)   

Have had a slight issue with the RGF -carb flooded ( with an onlooker of course), weenie little black dust like stuff in the float chamber. reckon it stuck the needle, maybe viton off the tip or inside of the supposedly E proof fuel pipe, anyway I'll watch it for a while and see if the black stuff re-appears
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Offline Sparky

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #19 on: 22.10. 2013 02:27 »
Bill-

Yes, Red Kote is red.  Our usual 91 octane pump gas is colorless, so when it came out of the tank looking like beat juice, my suspicions were aroused.  I just finished dumping a couple of gallons of ethanol-free petrol in the tank, so we'll see what happens.  While the carb was off anyway for de-gumming, I decided it was also time to have it resleeved, so in a few weeks when I get it back, I'll drain off a bit of fuel from the tank and see how it looks.

Offline Sparky

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #20 on: 12.11. 2013 04:24 »
OK, here is the follow-up.  I put some 100 octane ethanol-free gas in the tank.  After three weeks, the gas came out of the taps clear, so I am relieved that the Red Kote liner holds up to pure gasoline (er, I mean petrol).  I was really not looking forward to trying to strip the liner out of the tank without harming my paint job.

While the fuel sat in the tank, I was also getting my carb resleeved.  That, of course, is a topic covered in other threads, but I must say, it came back really nicely done.  This afternoon, I reassembled the carb and fired up the engine.  Wow, what a difference.  Even before it was fully warmed up, the engine idled down smoothly and responded well to throttle.  The question then is; was the improvement from removing ethanol from the fuel, resleeving the carb, or from using 100 octane fuel?  I suspect all three played a factor, but I am primarily relieved that removing the ethanol from the fuel seems to have halted the deterioration of my tank liner.




Offline duTch

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #21 on: 12.11. 2013 08:35 »

Good one sparks, hope it all hangs in there, may;ve said before, but what I was told is that acetone will dissolve it, and it can be reused too....?
 Just curious, but what Carb do you have again..? aah no matter, I'll catch it in the other tropics
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
Australia

Offline chaterlea25

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #22 on: 12.11. 2013 23:20 »
Hi ALL
Q, Whats the best thing for removing tank liner  *????* *????*
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Ans, petrol with ethanol  *ex* *ex* *ex* *ex*

1961 Super Rocket
1963 RGS (ongoing)

Offline Sparky

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #23 on: 13.11. 2013 00:15 »
Hi ALL
Q, Whats the best thing for removing tank liner  *????* *????*


I'll second that!!!!

Dutch,  it's a monobloc 389.

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #24 on: 13.11. 2013 08:54 »
I've still got a 20lt drum of 99% Indy grade methanol. I know it works on tank liners. DAMHIN.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7

Online bsa-bill

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #25 on: 13.11. 2013 11:13 »
Quote
Whats the best thing for removing tank liner

Should read "some tank liners"
Sorry to get pedantic but we do need to be careful here in not blaming ethanol for every case of disaster, otherwise we run the risk of missing the real cause in some cases.

case in point my monoblock flooded all by itself a month back, examining the float chamber I found a small amount of very fine black dust - suspects that sprang to mind

1. ethanol attacked the viton tip of the float needle
2. ethanol attack on the  (ethanol proof) fuel lines
3. fine dirt in petrol

I cleaned out the dust and put back the same needle, ran some fuel through a tissue - nothing, so far the carb has not flooded again but I'll keep an eye on it.
My money would be on a fill of dirty fuel at some time
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Offline Sparky

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #26 on: 14.11. 2013 13:20 »
As an aside on my liner experience noted above, when I removed the carb I found the fuel lines had become quite stiff.  This was only after one year and a mere 135 miles of riding since I put them on.  I fished out the remaining section of fuel line I had cut them from in my collection of bits, and it was as supple as the day I bought it.  I've had fuel lines turn rock hard after years of use, but this rather surprised me.  This is good quality hose designed for fuel, so I am wondering if it might be another ethanol-related phenomenon or just the consequence of sitting inches behind a hot cylinder.  I will definitely keep in mind the potential for accelerated deterioration, however.

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Re: tank liner
« Reply #27 on: 14.11. 2013 17:21 »
Quote
so I am wondering if it might be another ethanol-related phenomenon or just the consequence of sitting inches behind a hot cylinder

Just what I was hinting at Sparky, generally there could be an alternative reason for whatever, (that's not to discount Ethanol tho just take account of what else is going on)
and thinking about it didn't that clear tubing we used back in the day go brittle after some time (requiring a new bit of wire to twist around it  *smiley4*)
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco