Author Topic: Racing an A10  (Read 3848 times)

Offline chamber66

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Racing an A10
« on: 29.10. 2013 08:29 »
Hi, just come on here  mainly for my dad (he's a tecnophobe)
Is it possible to make an A10 engine competative in scrambles. I have seen heaps of other engines grafted in to BSA frames, TRIBSA, MABSA etc. But I have never seen an A10/7 compete?

I was going to build a TRIBSA myself, for classic racing, but I'm quite fancying an A10 for something different.
So just wondering why you never see them, and, can they be made competative to run against the Triumphs?

Oh! and what would I need to do to it
Thanks

Offline muskrat

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #1 on: 29.10. 2013 09:16 »
G'day again.
Look here http://www.a7a10.net/forum/index.php?topic=6024.0  9 pages of reading for you.
I road raced a "57 A7SS, there were more 650 Trihards and sNortons behind than in front.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR, '76 XT500, '77 AG175 '83 CB1100F, '81 CB900F project.
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Muskys Plunger A7

Offline fido

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #2 on: 29.10. 2013 09:34 »
I suppose weight is the main challenge. Triumph had the lighter 350 and 500 engine but BSA used a very similar engine for the 500 and 650. Things like alloy barrels and lightened crank might help.

Offline chamber66

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #3 on: 29.10. 2013 12:05 »
I suppose weight is the main challenge. Triumph had the lighter 350 and 500 engine but BSA used a very similar engine for the 500 and 650. Things like alloy barrels and lightened crank might help.
I have seen that thread already. Kind of what stared me thinking about using. An a10. Unfortunately I don,t have a cnc machine or his budget or skill, come to think of it lol.. Where can I get alloy barrels from, and who does crank work?

Offline muskrat

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #4 on: 29.10. 2013 19:09 »
It really depends on how fast do you want to spend? A big valve Super Rocket motor would be a good start, then the SRM roller conversion and oil pump. Then electric ignition, running total loss so you don't need the dynamo.
Then the frame, wheels, brakes and suspension.
Or find an old shed sitter, clean it, get it going and have some fun.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR, '76 XT500, '77 AG175 '83 CB1100F, '81 CB900F project.
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7

Offline Bsa Nut

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #5 on: 29.10. 2013 20:30 »
"""It really depends on how fast do you want to spend?"""

I love that line. ;)
Great advice.

I have an A65...with the billet conrods from Thunder, SRM oil pump, mild head work, Boyer Ignition...etc.etc.
She runs FINE! ;0

Speed is expensive, how fast can you afford to go?
-Luke

Offline muskrat

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #6 on: 30.10. 2013 07:00 »
I recently went on a dirt ride with my club (Shoalhaven Classic Motorcycle Club) of about 70 miles of fire trails (4WD only). All others on old XR250's TT600's a few tidlers and a newish Kwaka 650 trailie, all with knobies. I was on my '64 A65 with road tyres and high bars. I was first at every turn, had a ball. At the next meeting i was awarded a Superman suit ;D.
So really you can do almost anything on anything and have fun, and don't need to spend a cent.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR, '76 XT500, '77 AG175 '83 CB1100F, '81 CB900F project.
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7

Offline chamber66

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #7 on: 30.10. 2013 07:25 »
Ummm good advice, i'm still a bit torn on this one as to which way to go. I'm not to worried about being competetive, but i don't want to come last either. So does anyone make alloy barrels for the A10?

Offline Rocket Racer

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #8 on: 30.10. 2013 08:27 »
you aren't going to find alloy barrell's unless you::
a.  have more money than sense or
b. are a very clever engineer and can make some

however I've recently shortened my A10 race motor by half an inch (std cast iron barrel) and very pleased with it.

An A7 or A10 can certainly punch above its weight, however the throttle does need to be twisted  ;)
Over the weekend on a track with damp corners I was driving round the outside of a unit triumph 750 and a pre unit triumph 780, sadly could quite stay ahead but they couldn't shake me off and I only run 650cc

Nothing wrong with the humble beesa twins
A good rider periodically checks all nuts and bolts with a spanner to see that they are tight - Instruction Manual for BSA B series, p46, para 2.
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Online WozzA

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #9 on: 30.10. 2013 08:41 »
It would'nt be too hard or expensive to fabricate some home made mods like these for racing..
'51 Golden Flash Plunger
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Offline muskrat

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #10 on: 30.10. 2013 11:15 »
Even a mildly tuned Road Rocket or Super Rocket will perform well. Large journal crank and thick flange barrels are a must, roller timing side would be good. A scr gearbox would be a good choice. Dow type double damper rods for the forks and better rear shocks should keep the frame off the ground.
A cricket box for yourself will keep the wife happy. *eek*
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR, '76 XT500, '77 AG175 '83 CB1100F, '81 CB900F project.
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7

Offline tombeau

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #11 on: 30.10. 2013 12:34 »
I'll probably be drummed off the site for saying this...
But me and a mate swapped bikes for an afternoon run. His was a Preunit Thunderbird.
We both came to the conclusion that a Tribsa was a good idea.
...well, over a Triumph anyway  *smile*

Offline Topdad

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #12 on: 30.10. 2013 12:51 »
Think you're bang on the money, in our crowd many moons ago one mate had a pre-unit Thunderbird and not for nothing were they called " the one with the wobbily frame " we regularly used to take the p*** out of it by getting  around it and inspected it for a hinge in the middle and I don't mean  s/w arm  ,no exageration when I was behind him and he opened her up the frame shortened on the drive side and lengthened when he closed down again very scary . That being said I've seen some very quick tribsa, BobH.
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Offline tombeau

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Offline chamber66

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Re: Racing an A10
« Reply #14 on: 30.10. 2013 15:43 »