Author Topic: Welding Crankcases  (Read 5215 times)

Offline muskrat

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #15 on: 12.12. 2013 12:26 »
That looks very much like the Hanrob system invented by an Aussie but could not get backing here so he sold it to the US. I saw it used to fill a hole in a coke can just like in the video. I haven't seen Lumiweld but it must be very similar.
Cheers
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Online chaterlea25

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #16 on: 12.12. 2013 18:52 »
Hi All,
I think the stuff Musky is referring to is called "technoweld"
http://www.techno-weld.co.uk/product.html

I have seen the same demonstration by a guy at Stafford show
I have used it and also Lumiweld
The technoweld is more aluminium coloured and the repair is not as obvious
In my experience it is easier to use "Technoweld" than Lumiweld" it seems to "tin" better onto the alloy being repaired
Both welds are as hard as steel when finished

Cheers
John
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Offline kiwipom

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #17 on: 12.12. 2013 19:59 »
hi guys, apparently this is the one that you need,cheers
...
aluminium welding rods
APROX: 460mm / 3mm
HTS-2000 Second Generation Fluxless Brazing Rod
Used with nothing more than a heat source, such as propane or oxy-acetylene!
Through recent advancements in metallurgy, HTS-2000 is found to be the easiest, fastest, and strongest brazing rod ever to be developed! Made for all non-ferrous metals and aluminum parts, HTS-2000 is a second generation Industrial Strength Brazing Rod created from a revolutionary new formula.
Not to be confused with Alumaloy, Alumaweld, Alumarod, Aladdin 3 in 1, or any other first generation rods most of them consisting of 3 alloys.
HTS-2000 is a unique stand-alone product, Comprised of nine alloys that cost more to produce and through exhaustive testing led to this superior advanced technology.

CHECK IT OUT ON YOUTUBE:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwyglwkZcCU
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Online RichardL

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #18 on: 12.12. 2013 21:29 »
What sort of the Devil's mischief is this stuff!

Richard L.
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Online chaterlea25

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #19 on: 13.12. 2013 01:18 »
Hi All,
Well !!!
Some time ago I sucummed to the HTS blurb for their "cast iron" brazing rods
Firstly The "postage " amount jumped to an extordinate amount after I had placed an order  *????* *????*
I made a couple of phone calls to USA and told them I wanted standard US mail postage
This they eventually agreed to ??
Anyway I tried out the rods on some cast iron fin test pieces
The cast iron was running/melting at about the same point as the rods would melt !!!
Fer fu**sake  *ex* *ex* *ex*

I eventually sorted the problem by using low temp silver solder rods

caveat emptor

John
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Online RichardL

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #20 on: 13.12. 2013 02:37 »
John,

I think this may be a ridiculous question, but are you saying that the HTS rod somehow causes the cast iron to melt at a lower temperature or that the melting point of the rod was too high?

Richard L.
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Online bsa-bill

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #21 on: 13.12. 2013 08:57 »
Quote
The cast iron was running/melting at about the same point as the rods would melt

They do like to modify English over there, I'd guess their definitions of braze and weld are hazy
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Online chaterlea25

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #22 on: 13.12. 2013 17:29 »
Hi Richard and All,
Maybe I shouldnt post when I get home from the pub  *ex* *ex*
What happened was that to get the rods to melt into the joints the parent cast iron needed to be almost at melting point, so rod melting temp is very high

Much to risky with the delicate cast head in the photos, its from my 1925 Chater Lea Blackburne project
It took 5 or 6 years to find that head, it is very good mechanically but had suffered a lot of fin damage
I cut the new fin repair pieces from an old Bantam barrel  *idea*
The original head had been welded in several places and cracked when I heated it to fit some new guides

Hope this explains
John
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Online RichardL

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #23 on: 13.12. 2013 23:20 »
Like I said, asking if the rod made the cast iron melt at a lower temperature was a ridiculous stretch. Neverthess, that is a fantastic piece of metal and I can see why you would find it precious.

Richard L.
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Offline Bsa Nut

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #24 on: 14.12. 2013 11:01 »
I have an inner mating bracket on my A7 cases that is broken...
it looked like the stud was bent, and the dowel pin was seized.
The tab took the brunt during separation.
I'm going to give these HTS rods a try. Thanks for the information.
I'll reply with results.
-Luke
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Offline BSA_54A10

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Re: Welding Crankcases
« Reply #25 on: 24.02. 2014 11:55 »
Like I said, asking if the rod made the cast iron melt at a lower temperature was a ridiculous stretch. Neverthess, that is a fantastic piece of metal and I can see why you would find it precious.

Richard L.
Not as silly as it sounds.
The filler rod dissolves into the parent metal just like sugar dissolves into a cup of tea.
In the area where the rod penetrates a new alloy is formed as the chemistry is changed.
The new alloy has a substantially lower melting point than the parent metal.
Most of these filler rods work this way.
They are complicated mixes ( oft not alloyed at all ) of different metals.
One or more of the metals in the rod dissolve into the parent metal thus make a bond with it and the rest of the rod sticks to the metal dissolved into the parent metal thus make up much of the bulk of the join.
The first generation of these were basically zinc or bismuth with tin, cadimum, copper, lead, arsnic & antimony in varing proportions.
Iron will form a very stable phase with all of these metals but it has a very high melting point.
These iron phases form tiny grains which cause the metal to solidify so the joint will quickly go "mushy" and the filler will not flow.
They are also all very brittle so the joint will have very low strength.
I have no idea of what is in the "New generation" alloys but they will all work on the same principle.

The very best way to do cases is as Musky suggested and get a Dillon welding torch now called a DHC 2000 torch ( Dillon the inventor. Henrob the marketer & Cobra the manufacturer ).
You really can get a dirty casting and weld it as is. You will get a reasonably sound weld but it won't be pretty.
A little bit of cleaning & preparation will yeild a much better result,
I have had mine of near 30 years and can not fault it.
There are about 6 members of the BSAMCC of NSW with them all of these members came to me to get something welded and fell in love with a kit that allowed them to literally weld like a pro.
Actually I can fault it, your hands end up being a lot closer to the work than using a CIG torch so I have gotton some nasty burns and the heat shield is really cumbersome to fit & awkward to use.
However the gear is so good I usually weld bare handed.

BSA used straight Al-Si alloys, usually in the 8% to 11% Silicon range up until the late 60's when they went from sand casting to permenent mould casting when they used an Al -Si-Cu alloy.
High siicon rods are the best to use but are really expensive as they are used exclusivly by torch welders and 99% of aluminium welding now days is electric and high silicon rods do not arc reliably.
I generally use 5% silicon rods because they are cheap.

For cast iron welding I use old broken piston rings ( not chrome plated ones ) as I have a lot of them.
I used to preheat castiron on the BBQ but now I have gone one better and actually weld on the BBQ ( after preating )
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