Author Topic: Charging problem  (Read 1947 times)

Offline Peter in Aus

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #15 on: 30.06. 2016 01:27 »
Your right there John 6V needs a 220 ohm 1/4 or 1/2 Watt resister and 12V a 560 ohm resister ;)
Peter
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Busselton West Australia
49 A7 longstroke
58 A10  SA

Offline duTch

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #16 on: 30.06. 2016 02:58 »
Quote
*eek* *eek* *eek* *eek*

They wont last long like that  *ex* *ex* *ex*

They are diodes not bulbs so need resistors to limit the current through them
and....
Quote
Your right there John 6V needs a 220 ohm 1/4 or 1/2 Watt resister and 12V a 560 ohm resister ;)

 Thanks for the tip- as they are two 3.2V diodes wired in series for 6V I figured they'd work ok  (3.2+3.2=6.4)*????*. I'm not sure of their max rating, I'll check up- but if they blow, I'll look into adding a resistor; should it be one resistor in parallel over the two in series?
  My bodgy Volt meter connected to battery shows ~7.0v-7.8 V whilst riding sometimes spikes to a bit over 8V (daytime- no lights, dunno about night/lights on, can't see it. I could turn the lights on in daylight to check it, but the daylight might leak in and contaminate the result *eek*- just jokin')

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Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
Australia

Offline KiwiGF

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #17 on: 30.06. 2016 07:43 »
Isn't 3.2v for LED diode the minimum volts needed to light the LED? If that 3.2v rating figure is what is called its "forward voltage"?

But maybe the LED you have have a resistor built into them *dunno*

From what I just googled  *work* an LED diode has very little resistance once it reaches its forward voltage so if you put a 3.2v LED across a 4v battery it would short out the battery and probably blow the LED, conversely if you put it across a 3v battery it would not light up at all.
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New Zealand

1956 A10 Golden Flash (1st finished project)

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Online edboy

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #18 on: 30.06. 2016 22:12 »
curse modern technology.  left behind ages ago but now creeping up on the old bsa of all things. my old tip is to bypass the ameter and put the charge wire straight into the lighting switch. but how do i worry about charging ? you ask. well rev the old girl with all the lights switched on and see if the bulbs go bright. no brighty- no lighty.  when its dark and i need to know how my lights are charging i watch the speedo light bulb. if it goes very dim or out then i know i m in trouble.
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Offline coater87

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #19 on: 02.07. 2016 21:35 »
curse modern technology. no brighty- no lighty. 


 Quote of the year, right there. *ex*
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Online Triton Thrasher

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #20 on: 02.07. 2016 21:51 »
curse modern technology.  left behind ages ago but now creeping up on the old bsa of all things. my old tip is to bypass the ameter and put the charge wire straight into the lighting switch. but how do i worry about charging ? you ask. well rev the old girl with all the lights switched on and see if the bulbs go bright. no brighty- no lighty.  when its dark and i need to know how my lights are charging i watch the speedo light bulb. if it goes very dim or out then i know i m in trouble.

The production racers' trick was to bridge the ammeter terminals. The ammeter would still work, a bit, but if it's coil fractured it didn't isolate the battery.
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Offline Peter in Aus

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #21 on: 03.07. 2016 03:20 »
curse modern technology.  left behind ages ago but now creeping up on the old bsa of all things. my old tip is to bypass the ameter and put the charge wire straight into the lighting switch. but how do i worry about charging ? you ask. well rev the old girl with all the lights switched on and see if the bulbs go bright. no brighty- no lighty.  when its dark and i need to know how my lights are charging i watch the speedo light bulb. if it goes very dim or out then i know i m in trouble.

The production racers' trick was to bridge the ammeter terminals. The ammeter would still work, a bit, but if it's coil fractured it didn't isolate the battery.

That is not a bad idea, it has often worried me that the coil would become open circuit in the amp meter especially with these cheep amp meters coming out of India and gods knows where.
It could be catastrophic if it did, and  you are using AC generators "like me." *roll*
Peter
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Busselton West Australia
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Offline mikeb

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #22 on: 03.07. 2016 11:37 »
dutch - finally something on a BSA forum that I know about. your LEDs won't last long as they are. they need a current limiting resistor in one leg. also, as you have a red and a green they have different forward voltages so need different values. assuming you are 6v system then with max volts of 7.2V and 20mA per LED best idea would be  put a separate resistor in line with each one - a 220 Ohm series with the green and a 270 Ohm with the red. then put those in parallel, like the pic. if 12v system use 680 Ohm for both (or 560 Ohm for the green if you can find similar). all 1/4W.
but it is modern technology, an acetylene lamp would be more authentic

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Offline duTch

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #23 on: 03.07. 2016 20:16 »
 Thanks guys, a few things I can respond to there, but first- I forgot to say on the way back from the swappie when I picked up the S/H +/- 8A meter, I stopped in a the young fellas and forgot to turn off the lights, no big deal- figured it'll charge up on the rest of the trip (at dusk). That was not to be as I found out later, my trusty +/- 30A Fergie meter musta gone on strike at possible redundancy *eek*.
 I didn't realize until I went out for a test with the new setup, and couldn't get a charge. Ok it was in the daylight so I figured the daylight was pushing the Lucas-light back in *pull hair out*, but the LED's worked ok, and even came on with the brakes *conf*.
 So I stuffed around a bit and got the charge happening again and went out today with lights on and charging- the whole bit and yep the LED's failed fairly soon.

 I did figure out that the 5mm green LED could be a 3.2 or 3.5 V, but red ones are only rated for 1.7 / 2.1V. Only the green one blew, red still works from a 3V (2.98v) button battery.

 Mike, (and all) it should be obvious I only know enough to be dangerous...I had them in series (as in pic) but you suggest to run them in parallel?
  KiwiGF;
Quote
Isn't 3.2v for LED diode the minimum volts needed to light the LED? If that 3.2v rating figure is what is called its "forward voltage"?

But maybe the LED you have have a resistor built into them *dunno*

From what I just googled  *work* an LED diode has very little resistance once it reaches its forward voltage so if you put a 3.2v LED across a 4v battery it would short out the battery and probably blow the LED, conversely if you put it across a 3v battery it would not light up at all.


 The rated voltage is a 'typical voltage', but I think they fire up lower but they also have a 'VDD'-Maximum V that I haven't determined- others'll know.

  Edboy;
Quote
Quote from: edboy on 30.06. 2016 22:12

    curse modern technology.  left behind ages ago but now creeping up on the old bsa of all things. my old tip is to bypass the ameter and put the charge wire straight into the lighting switch. but how do i worry about charging ? you ask. well rev the old girl with all the lights switched on and see if the bulbs go bright. no brighty- no lighty.  when its dark and i need to know how my lights are charging i watch the speedo light bulb. if it goes very dim or out then i know i m in trouble.

 I don't disagree, but every now and then I make an attempt at being 'civilized', and this is one of those moments- it don't come easy *conf*
 TT
Quote
The production racers' trick was to bridge the ammeter terminals. The ammeter would still work, a bit, but if it's coil fractured it didn't isolate the battery.

  *dunno*
 So I don't know what I did to fix my charging issue, but I retuned the reg and it's within specs I think- maybe had a loose wire *dunno*


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Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
Australia

Offline mikeb

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #24 on: 03.07. 2016 21:30 »
dutch - leds have a forward voltage but require a certain current through them. the resistors act like a crude current limiter. they aren't like lightbulbs that have a voltage rating. if you put leds in series you still need a resistor but it would be smaller value with more current variability across the 6-7.2v range of your bike. either google it or just follow that pic (yes - in parallel)
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Offline duTch

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Re: Charging problem
« Reply #25 on: 06.07. 2016 05:32 »

 I thought I had some of the recommended resistors but no-go, so went and bought some at Jaycar, and also a regulator that I thought might do the job.
  It's a LM 2936 2936 3.3, but I'll play worth the resistors first and see what damage I can do.

 On the other note, that's something crazy happening with the charge system;  it works and then doesn't and then does again. ..ammeter keeps goin' spazzo. Might put the old meter back in and see what it does, but being less sensitive may not say much.
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Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
Australia