Author Topic: Normal speed checking.  (Read 2384 times)

Offline 1KCBC

  • Songkhla,Thailand.
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Normal speed checking.
« on: 20.09. 2006 03:15 »
Hi,I would like to know about your normal speed when you ride on the road.Just
compare with my bike and it can be a good information that how the bikes work.my riding in normal speed is 90 km/h.How about your bike?

  Have a nice riding.
        Jaran
1951 A10GF,(looking for  A10 swinging-arm)

Offline LJ.

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Re: Normal speed checking.
« Reply #1 on: 20.09. 2006 09:27 »

Good morning Jaran!

Well as your using Km/h and I use MPH I wont confuse yourself or myself and leave it to the continentals for you to compare with. But, it largely depends on your gearing... ie gearbox, engine sprockets etc. So it is difficult to compare really. I ride at a speed that I think the bike sounds happy with, I dont make it scream. If your having a job hanging on when riding then maybe your going a bit fast! :D
Ride Safely Lads! LJ.
**********************
1940 BSA M20 500cc Girder/Rigid- (SOLD)
1947 BSA M21 600cc Girder/Rigid-Green
1949 BSA A7   500cc Girder/Plunger Star Twin-(SOLD)
1953 BSA B33  500cc Teles/Plunger-Maroon
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Blue
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Red

Offline 1KCBC

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Re: Normal speed checking.
« Reply #2 on: 20.09. 2006 10:53 »
Hi LJ,Thanks for your suggestion ,my bike is still orignal for the engine and gear.
(1.6 km = 1 mile)
1951 A10GF,(looking for  A10 swinging-arm)

Offline BrianDallasTX

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Re: Normal speed checking.
« Reply #3 on: 20.09. 2006 13:26 »
I agree with LJ here, but fwiw I typically ride around 50 mph on surface streets, and 70 on the highway.  The bike is turning around 2800 rpm at 50 and 3400 at 70 both in 4th gear.  The people here in Dallas really speed, so even if 50 in a 35 zone seems fast it is just keeping with the flow.  But then again it depends on where I am.
Brian
'63 A10 Super Rocket

Offline a10gf

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Re: Normal speed checking.
« Reply #4 on: 20.09. 2006 23:55 »
Agree, if the bike does 50 to 60 mph, approx 80 to 100 kmh, uphill too, without struggling, or vibrating too much, and some extra speed is still available when needed, all is well. At least on my bike the vibrations at over 70 mph\110 kmh are quite scary, and acts as a very effective mental throttle & rpm limiter! I have a 20 tooth gear sprocket (+1), makes the cruising speed rpm\vibrations more relaxed, at the cost of some acceleration. Anyway the brakes & roadholding is not safe enough for high speed. And why put too much load & pressure on the nice old machinery? If I want to go fast & have more brakes & roadholding I'd ride my Triumph 900. Or my car  :D

Regards
Erling

A10 GF '53 My A10 website
"Success only gets you a ticket to a much more difficult task"

Offline BrianDallasTX

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Re: Normal speed checking.
« Reply #5 on: 21.09. 2006 16:48 »
I notice that the vibration of the bike is good up to about 70, after that it I can really feel it in the foot pegs.  The bike seems solid and steady as well.  I try not to abuse it too much   >:D as I do commute on it frequently.  Have been looking into buying a Thruxton as of late.  Got a ride on one last weeekend and boy do I love the brakes etc.
Brian
'63 A10 Super Rocket

Offline dpaddock

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Re: Normal speed checking.
« Reply #6 on: 29.09. 2006 00:05 »
Footpeg vibes are generally the result of head steady looseness. I fabricated a substitute steady from 1/4-inch steel bar and line-reamed the bolt holes, using hi-tensile socket head  cap screws and ESNA nuts. It's overkill but it does the job. I discovered this problem during the first rebuild when I found a crack in one of the frame down tubes. My bike is a 1957 Spitfire with some engine modification.
David
'57 Spitfire