Author Topic: Engine Identification Help  (Read 249 times)

Offline ADP91

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Engine Identification Help
« on: 16.06. 2020 18:50 »
Hello all,

I have an A10 engine with stamping: DA10 R 899 HHC

Can anyone shed some light onto what year and model this engine is? My current guesses are 1958 A10 Golden Flash or 1960 A10 Super Rocket. 

I'm in the process of ordering a new carburetor from Burlen and would like to make sure I order the correct one.

Cheers!

Online muskrat

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Re: Engine Identification Help
« Reply #1 on: 16.06. 2020 21:40 »
G'day ADP91.
I think 1960 Super Rocket. From Draganfly info.
Cheers
'51 A7 plunger, '57 A7SS now A10CR,  '83 CB1100F, 88 FXST .
Australia
Muskys Plunger A7

Offline AdrianJ

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Re: Engine Identification Help
« Reply #2 on: 16.06. 2020 23:12 »
ADP91 and Musky,
Bacon says the same 1960 Super Rocket
Adrian
'53 Plunger Flash, Steib S500.


Online KiwiGF

  • Last had an A10 in 1976, in 2011 it was time for my 2nd one. It was the project from HELL (but I learned a lot....)
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Re: Engine Identification Help
« Reply #3 on: 17.06. 2020 06:26 »
Hello all,

I have an A10 engine with stamping: DA10 R 899 HHC

Can anyone shed some light onto what year and model this engine is? My current guesses are 1958 A10 Golden Flash or 1960 A10 Super Rocket. 

I'm in the process of ordering a new carburetor from Burlen and would like to make sure I order the correct one.

Cheers!

It should have an alloy head, the inlet diameter should also be a factor in the carb type, cyl. heads can get changed......to an incorrect one.
New Zealand

1956 A10 Golden Flash (1st finished project)

1949 B31 rigid “400cc hot rod” (2nd finished project, + favourite bike)

GL1800 Goldwing, well, the wife likes it

KTM 950 ADV, cos it’s 100% nuts

1952 Armstrong Siddeley Whitley for rainy days (with wife)

Offline ADP91

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Re: Engine Identification Help
« Reply #4 on: 17.06. 2020 16:50 »
Thanks for the advice everyone.

I'll verify which head is mounted before I order anything.

KiwiGF would it make the most sense to order the carb that corresponds with the type of cylinder head? (I.e. cast iron vs alloy)

Online KiwiGF

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Re: Engine Identification Help
« Reply #5 on: 17.06. 2020 22:24 »
Thanks for the advice everyone.

I'll verify which head is mounted before I order anything.

KiwiGF would it make the most sense to order the carb that corresponds with the type of cylinder head? (I.e. cast iron vs alloy)

Hi ADP91, a simple answer to that question is “yes” but ideally one would look at the bigger question of what bike you wish to end up with. Many of these bikes are not “standard” (eg as they left the factory) now, for one reason or another.

So, if your frame originally belonged to an iron head A7, some would go to great lengths to fit an iron head A7 engine to it, similarly for a frame originally fitted with a super rocket engine.

Conversely many (probably most) bikes are a mixture of original parts from different models, and of course “pattern” or recently manufactured parts.

You have (at least) the drive side crankcase from a super rocket, most likely you have the timing side as well, but nothing else about the engine is certain!

The uk bsa club has very good info on engine and frame numbers see:

https://www.bsaownersclub.co.uk/machine_id.php

As an example, the “correct” Amal carb for my iron head 1956 golden flash is a type 376 1 1/16” monobloc, later golden flashes had a type 389 1 1/8” monobloc, and the (alloy head) super rocket may have had changes in carb spec over the years as well (I'm no expert).  Certainly some super rockets had the 389, but I have a feeling when the golden flash got upgraded to the bigger carb, the super rocket got a bigger carb as well.

Many people fit the correct bore size amal concentric carb if they are not worried about originality, its cheaper and arguably a better design.

I hope that helps rather than confuses  *dunno*
New Zealand

1956 A10 Golden Flash (1st finished project)

1949 B31 rigid “400cc hot rod” (2nd finished project, + favourite bike)

GL1800 Goldwing, well, the wife likes it

KTM 950 ADV, cos it’s 100% nuts

1952 Armstrong Siddeley Whitley for rainy days (with wife)