Author Topic: Bike lifts  (Read 363 times)

Online Minto

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Bike lifts
« on: 18.06. 2020 22:38 »
A seed was planted yesterday, thanks Greybeard! And I've started thinking how much better my life would be if I had a way of elevating my couple of bikes so that I didn't have to scrat round on the, now quite oily, floor in my tiny garage.
I've looked at a couple of options (34) and they seem to come in two main types, the full length, park the bike on and strap it down type, and the much smaller lift it by the frame rails type.
Has anyone got any experience of either type? What have you got and what are the pros n cons?
What I really need is something that I can stow when it's not being used. My garage is home to two motorbikes, two pushies, five surfboards, a table saw, a band saw, a mitre saw, a workbench, loads of hand tools, a three tier tool chest, a welder and a set of ladders that I keep banging my head on. Oh and shed loads of crap that seem to expand every time I sort through it.
Cheers
Jase
52 A10 plunger
Aprilia RSVR

Online Greybeard

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #1 on: 18.06. 2020 23:02 »
You've seen mine. My motorbike lives on it.

Offline scotty

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #2 on: 18.06. 2020 23:11 »
This thread might help

https://www.a7a10.net/forum/index.php?topic=12126.msg94024#msg94024

I use a plywood affair that is modular and stows pretty flat

S

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Offline Joolstacho

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #3 on: 18.06. 2020 23:49 »
Mine's a full length lifting bench, with manual and hydraulic lift. I was lucky enough to get it cheap -$400.
I should have got one 30 years ago! What a difference not having to grovel on the ground to work on the bike.
Just get one, you'll  never regret it.

Online KiwiGF

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #4 on: 19.06. 2020 01:24 »
A seed was planted yesterday, thanks Greybeard! And I've started thinking how much better my life would be if I had a way of elevating my couple of bikes so that I didn't have to scrat round on the, now quite oily, floor in my tiny garage.
I've looked at a couple of options (34) and they seem to come in two main types, the full length, park the bike on and strap it down type, and the much smaller lift it by the frame rails type.
Has anyone got any experience of either type? What have you got and what are the pros n cons?
What I really need is something that I can stow when it's not being used. My garage is home to two motorbikes, two pushies, five surfboards, a table saw, a band saw, a mitre saw, a workbench, loads of hand tools, a three tier tool chest, a welder and a set of ladders that I keep banging my head on. Oh and shed loads of crap that seem to expand every time I sort through it.
Cheers
Jase

I use a diy job as pic, manual winch, i reckon one of the most important features is to be able to safely load and unload the bike on your own, hanging onto the bars with one hand whilst doing a strap up with the other will lead to disaster  *problem* *sad*

Also make sure it cannot move when you attempt to load the bike otherwise the lift may roll down the ramp leading up to yr shed, and into yr wife’s almost new Fiat *sad*
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Online orabanda

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #5 on: 19.06. 2020 05:06 »
Unfortunately sometimes grovelling is required even after we get the bike lift (or want another one!).
Richard

Online Colsbeeza

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #6 on: 19.06. 2020 06:05 »
I got mine two years ago for A$299, and was a one-off special on evilbay. Same to look at as Orabandas. It is brilliant.
Col
Colsbeeza
Australia

Offline Tomcat

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #7 on: 19.06. 2020 09:24 »
Mine's a full length lifting bench, with manual and hydraulic lift. I was lucky enough to get it cheap -$400.
I should have got one 30 years ago! What a difference not having to grovel on the ground to work on the bike.
Just get one, you'll  never regret it.

Yes, a must as far as I'm concerned.
If I may also ad, a small lathe is another essential in the restorers shed.
'48 A7 '59 SR '74 850 Commando TDM900

Offline bikerbob

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #8 on: 19.06. 2020 17:33 »
If you want to make your own here is an article taken from the BSA Star magazinine MAY 2001. I used this as the basis for my own.

Online Minto

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #9 on: 19.06. 2020 19:51 »
I'm thinking that I might have a go at building a wooden jobbie, that way I can customise it for my available space and requirements.
I'll keep you posted.
Jase
52 A10 plunger
Aprilia RSVR

Online Greybeard

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #10 on: 19.06. 2020 23:05 »
Someone here made their own from timber. Have a search through the forum.

Online Minto

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #11 on: 20.06. 2020 01:32 »
Cheers GB, I've seen a thread involving a slot together box type work table with a ramp and which ( Roger maybe), but I was thinking more along the lines of a wooden lifting table used in conjunction with a floor jack. Surely not that much to it. (Famous last words).
Jase
52 A10 plunger
Aprilia RSVR

Offline Joolstacho

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #12 on: 20.06. 2020 02:11 »
I'm a non-stop hopeless DIY man! But....
The real beauty of the commercially sold benches is the you can lift to varying heights, so if working on the motor low down, lift is at the top... working on instruments, levers, or wiring etc, drop it down, -you can always get it to the height that suits your stuffed back, (ask me how I know!)

Online Seabee

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #13 on: 20.06. 2020 02:14 »
And when not holding a bike, they make a great workbench!
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Online Beeza

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Re: Bike lifts
« Reply #14 on: 20.06. 2020 05:51 »
I bought this Eazyrizer Big Blue when I decided to build the salt bike, and its great. Easy to use and store, pretty good access all around the bike too, the only con would be if you want to access the primary and the gear box cover at the same time, nothing that a bit of pre planning cant sort out, it can clash with the sump also at times, but again a bit of pre planning and it works a treat.
I cant believe I hadn't got one sooner.
Thomas.