Author Topic: BSA A10 Fork Question  (Read 4056 times)

Offline Jayce Lane

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BSA A10 Fork Question
« on: 18.02. 2008 11:05 »
I was told that there was little difference between forks used on the different BSA a10 variants.  In my pursuit for spares, I have come across a set of forks from a 1971 BSA 650 and wondered if these would fit by 1955 a10 frame.

Any guidance here would be great.  The forks are on ebay an look like they are in good nick.

Regards


Offline Beezageezauk

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Re: BSA A10 Fork Question
« Reply #1 on: 18.02. 2008 19:57 »
Hi Jayce,

I would suggest that you let these forks go.  BSA forks varied from year to year and were dependant on the sort of front wheel and mudguard that was used.  For example:  The 54/55 models used the single sided brake and the fork legs were different to the 56/57 models that used the "Ariel" type alloy full width hub.  For '58 to '61 the "BSA" cast iron full width hub was used and there were two types of fork legs.  One was for the fully valenced mudguard (58/59) and the later (60/61) had the semi valenced mudguard fitted.  The mountings on these fork legs varied.

The above information is for the A7 and A10 Golden Flash because there was also a variation for the A7SS, Road Rocket, Super Rocket and the Rocket Gold Star.

Generally it is only the lower fork legs that vary from model to model.

Decide on which wheel and mudguard that you will use and then find the appropriate forks (or fork legs) to suit.  But stick to the correct model.  Don't try to mix and match 1955 to 1961 parts with those from 1962 onwards.  You will only open up a can of worms and end up wasting your cash.

Beezageezauk.

 


Online RichardL

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Re: BSA A10 Fork Question
« Reply #2 on: 18.02. 2008 20:45 »
Jayce,

A good example of mix and match can be seen on my bike at:  http://www.a7a10.net/forum/index.php?topic=166.0

I suppose this is what Beezageezauk was thinking when he said it would open a can of worms. I am rather certain that my fork legs are original '55, while the mudguard is of a later model A10 or, maybe, A50/65. As you will see, the fork legs have the fender mounting tabs on the trailing side. The mudguard, however, is of the type that uses yokes bolted to holes on the insides of the fork legs. My fork legs have no such holes. For me, contrary to Beezageezauk, this was not a waste of cash, because this is how I bought the motorcycle in 1973 for US $50. It was not until well into the 2003-started rebuild, and after considerable body work to the mudguard, that I realized the differences.  In looking at this you will see that I have vertical stays leading and trailing the forks, with the forward ones connecting where angled stays, from near the nose of the mudguard, would be correct for the model year. In the rebuild, I changed from flat-stock stays to round-stock, making the short trailing ones myself.

Recognizing that my front mudguard and stays are just a couple of the things that keep my bike from being original, I don't worry about it too much. In fact, I kinda like the girderish look it gives the front end, something Indian Larry might have call the "mechanicalness" of it all.

Richard
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020 (if it's not cancelled and we are free to move about by then). Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Offline Jayce Lane

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Re: BSA A10 Fork Question
« Reply #3 on: 19.02. 2008 07:19 »
thanks for the response guys, think i will leave it till I get the right things.  In the meantime I am going to sandblast and powdercoat the frame.  Something funny happened while getting quotes for the work, ended up speaking to a bloke at the place that does the powdercoating and he has some classic motorcycle clutter blocking is garage.  Apparently two matchless frames one from 1952 and a 1948 matchless engine and other bobs and bits.  Could pick this all up for $100.  So if the frames have forks and suspension bits then I might go matchless.  Who knows nice problem to have

Online RichardL

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Re: BSA A10 Fork Question
« Reply #4 on: 19.02. 2008 11:50 »
Jayce,

I meant to add that if you had the choice (and if I had had the choice) sticking to parts of the same model and model year would be best. I just wanted to show what could happen if a "can of worms" were opened.

That Matchless deal sounds good. When I see what appears a great deal (most not as good as yours), I have to remind myself that it will probabaly end up followed by some thousands of dollars, and weigh the deal by that, which may explain why I have just one bike (if you don't include my Raleigh).

Richard
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020 (if it's not cancelled and we are free to move about by then). Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Online groily

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Re: BSA A10 Fork Question
« Reply #5 on: 19.02. 2008 23:49 »
That Matchless deal sounds more than good Jayce! Get the bits and then dangle any you don't want in front of the members of the AJS and M Owners Club, and you'll not only maybe have a set of forks for yourself if you can get a set of Teledraulics plus or minus their yokes to fit the BSA frame, but a profit on top!! Groily
Bill

Offline wortluck

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Re: BSA A10 Fork Question
« Reply #6 on: 17.09. 2017 17:03 »
For '58 to '61 the "BSA" cast iron full width hub was used and there were two types of fork legs.  One was for the fully valenced mudguard (58/59) and the later (60/61) had the semi valenced mudguard fitted.  The mountings on these fork legs varied.

The above information is for the A7 and A10 Golden Flash because there was also a variation for the A7SS, Road Rocket, Super Rocket and the Rocket Gold Star.


Beezageezauk.
[/quote]

'Tis indeed a can of worms.  My bike is a '61 GF but has fully valanced mudguards which are secured on the lower legs with in-situ threads (left and right differ on the size of the thread so is probably some sort of bodge from many years ago - works well though).  Don't know if my bike should have semi valanced or not, but the ones it has seem to fit perfectly??
'62 Flash
'49 B31
'59 BMW R60
FS1-E, YB100, RS100, RD200DX,250DX,350B, XS750



"I may disagree with what you have to say, but I shall defend to the death your right to say it."
Evelyn Beatrice Hall

Online chaterlea25

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Re: BSA A10 Fork Question
« Reply #7 on: 17.09. 2017 18:40 »
Hi Wortluck
That topic dates from 2008   *eek*

John
1961 Super Rocket
1963 RGS (ongoing)

Offline coater87

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Re: BSA A10 Fork Question
« Reply #8 on: 18.09. 2017 07:24 »
 Hi John,

My bike dates from 1958,

 But I still like it. ;)

 Lee
Central Wisconsin in the U.S.

Offline wortluck

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Re: BSA A10 Fork Question
« Reply #9 on: 18.09. 2017 16:32 »
Heh, what's 10 years between Beezer nutcases.
'62 Flash
'49 B31
'59 BMW R60
FS1-E, YB100, RS100, RD200DX,250DX,350B, XS750



"I may disagree with what you have to say, but I shall defend to the death your right to say it."
Evelyn Beatrice Hall