Author Topic: Dry weight and power kw:s  (Read 3153 times)

Offline tombeau

  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Aug 2008
  • Posts: 678
  • Karma: 6
Dry weight and power kw:s
« on: 22.09. 2008 11:14 »
Hello,
Anyone got these figures for a Road Rocket?
I need 'em for insurance quotes.
Cheers,
iain

Offline LJ.

  • Peterborough UK.
  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Jun 2006
  • Posts: 1403
  • Karma: 15
  • The Red A10!
    • LJ's Website!
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #1 on: 22.09. 2008 14:56 »
No idea on dry weights and I assume Kw:s to be maybe kilowatts ? Although nothing to do with electricity as I had originally thought when I first got my bike... (Here was me thinking I had a terriffic dynamo!!) It's to do with power output ratio along with braking horse power. (I think i'll stop now before I look too stupid!)  *dunno*

Back then when I passed my test I found the A10 to be around 33 braking horse power although sales brouchers told us it was 35, I never saw that evidence (wonder if manosound Richard can come up with that?) So I was able to ride on a class A licence.

I'll stop now...   :P waffle waffle
Ride Safely Lads! LJ.
**********************
1940 BSA M20 500cc Girder/Rigid- (SOLD)
1947 BSA M21 600cc Girder/Rigid-Green
1949 BSA A7   500cc Girder/Plunger Star Twin-(SOLD)
1953 BSA B33  500cc Teles/Plunger-Maroon
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Blue
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Red

Offline groily

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2007
  • Posts: 1086
  • Karma: 18
    • www.brightsparkmagnetos.com
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #2 on: 22.09. 2008 20:55 »
1 bhp is 748Watts I think. So, for example, the 40-odd bhp for a Road Rocket (if that's about right) is approximately 75% of that in kW, which would be  . . . 30kW. Nudge downwards for cheaper premiums, no doubt!
Bill

Offline dpaddock

  • NC, USA
  • Valued Contributor
  • ****
  • Join Date: Jul 2006
  • Posts: 429
  • Karma: 5
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #3 on: 22.09. 2008 22:21 »
On 12.4.08, 'The A10 1954 Instruction Manual' was posted on this site, listing the various engine outputs. The RR was listed at 40 hp @ 6000 rpm and 8:1 compression ratio. Forty hp translates to 29.92 kW, using groilly's (correct) conversion factor.

Use the dry weight as given in Owen Wright's 'Super Profile' of 418 lb for the SR.
David
'57 Spitfire


Online RichardL

  • Outside Chicago, IL
  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Nov 2007
  • Posts: 5077
  • Karma: 48
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #4 on: 23.09. 2008 03:28 »
Well, thanks for the vote of confidence L.J. I would have cited the same conversion factor. The question is, why rate the engines in kW.My only thought, without doing what would be simple research, is that it relates the horsepower to a more scientific unit that is directly related to heat and, posssibly in turn, emissions.


Richard
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020 (if it's not cancelled and we are free to move about by then). Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Offline fido

  • Zala County, Hungary
  • Resident Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Aug 2006
  • Posts: 684
  • Karma: 8
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #5 on: 23.09. 2008 07:54 »
I suppose Kw is just the accepted metric unit for power. Imperial units are no longer politically correct  *sarcastic*

Online RichardL

  • Outside Chicago, IL
  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Nov 2007
  • Posts: 5077
  • Karma: 48
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #6 on: 23.09. 2008 12:18 »
For me, engines will always be in "hp". I am just not ready to be enthused or impressed by a P-51 Allison engine at 750kW, but give me "1000 hp" and I can feel the rumble without an airplane present. For "750 kW" I want to see a really bright light bulb. Don't get me wrong, I inderstand the use of the units, being degreed in electrical engineering, but some things are in the blood. Be honest, did you learn about engines and "feel" their power based on their hp rating or their kW?

Richard
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020 (if it's not cancelled and we are free to move about by then). Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Offline groily

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2007
  • Posts: 1086
  • Karma: 18
    • www.brightsparkmagnetos.com
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #7 on: 23.09. 2008 17:24 »
I agree with Richard if an hp is a bhp! But are you, Richard, familiar with the arcane UK horse-power formula of old, which gave the taxable rating of engines in the old days, and held back engine development for cooking cars appreciably? (Because a long stroke had the effect of reducing the horse-power rating - with good reason!). Austin 7, Morris 8, Standard 10, Rover 14, Rolls 20, etc etc etc. Too arcane to quote the calculation here unless you want it - and I'd have to go and check in a book.

And what's a PS anyone? I see my Yamaha has lots of them apparently, but I had never given it any thought until this thread started!
Bill

Offline england kev

  • A's Best Friend
  • ***
  • Join Date: Mar 2008
  • Posts: 56
  • Karma: 0
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #8 on: 23.09. 2008 17:26 »
Dry weight is 423Lbs. According to BSA.


Offline trevinoz

  • Newcastle, N.S.W. Australia.
  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2006
  • Posts: 2905
  • Karma: 67
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #9 on: 23.09. 2008 23:43 »
P S = Pony Size.

Online RichardL

  • Outside Chicago, IL
  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Nov 2007
  • Posts: 5077
  • Karma: 48
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #10 on: 24.09. 2008 02:48 »
Pony Size? Seriously?

Yes, BHP, but when talkin', maybe just "Horse."

Richard
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020 (if it's not cancelled and we are free to move about by then). Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Offline trevinoz

  • Newcastle, N.S.W. Australia.
  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2006
  • Posts: 2905
  • Karma: 67
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #11 on: 24.09. 2008 08:42 »
I have no idea what PS means but when the Japanese bikes first became available in large capacities and quoted PS horsepower we laughed at them and laughingly called it Pony Size.
Who's laughing now?
    Trev.

Offline Dynamo Regulators Mike

  • A's Best Friend
  • ***
  • Join Date: Apr 2008
  • Posts: 165
  • Karma: 6
  • Fareham, UK, 1960 A10
    • Dynamo Regulators Ltd
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #12 on: 24.09. 2008 09:03 »
But a pony only slightly smaller than a standard horse. This from Wikipedia "Horsepower":-

This (PS) unit (German: Pferdestärke = horse strength) is no longer a statutory unit, but is still commonly used in Europe, South America and Japan, especially by the automotive and motorcycle industry. It was adopted throughout continental Europe with designations equivalent to the English "horsepower", but mathematically different from the British unit. It is defined by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)[5] in Braunschweig as exactly:
1 PS = 75 kilopond·metre/second ~= 735.5 newton·m/s ~= 735.5 W ~= 0.7355 kW ~= 0.98632 hp (SAE)

Makes much more difference whether power measured at crank or rear wheel than assuming metric PS is same as BHP, and that nugget is often not made crystal. Anyone know what a 'kilopond' is?

cheers, Mike

Mike Hutchings
A10, B50, T800; 1,2,3 (& DVR2)
Director, DRL www.dynamoregulators.com

Online bsa-bill

  • Wise & Enlightened
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2006
  • Posts: 5479
  • Karma: 64
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #13 on: 24.09. 2008 11:20 »
From Wikipedia

  (Redirected from Kilopond)
Jump to: navigation, search

The unit kilogram-force (kgf, often, incorrectly, just kg) or kilopond (kp) is defined as the force exerted by Earth's gravity on one kilogram of mass. Although the gravitational pull of the Earth varies as a function of position on earth, it is here defined as exactly 9.80665 m/s². So one kilogram-force is by definition equal to 9.80665 newtons.[1][2] Similarly a gram-force is 9.80665 milli-newtons (or 0.00980665 newtons), and a milligram-force is.... 9.80665 micro-newtons (or 0.00000980665 newtons).

All the best - Bill
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Offline beezalex

  • North Carolina, USA
  • Valued Contributor
  • ****
  • Join Date: Jan 2008
  • Posts: 374
  • Karma: 4
Re: Dry weight and power kw:s
« Reply #14 on: 24.09. 2008 14:57 »
All emotional attachments to units of measure aside, period road tests rate the 59 Road Rocket with 46 hp (34 kW) and the '61 model with 43 hp (32 kW).

BTW, here's a handy unit conversion site I use all the time: http://www.convert-me.com/en/
Alex

Too many BSA's