Author Topic: Swing arm removal  (Read 2597 times)

Offline huddie

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Swing arm removal
« on: 29.07. 2009 18:31 »
Hi All, I have read the historic topics on this subject and it seems this is a job not to be tackled lightly. I want mine out because I am not sure if its going to be possible to paint (spray) my frame and s/arm sufficiently well with the two still attached. I have tried one suggested method using a threaded bar with washers and large nuts to apply outward pressure to both sides, using the holes in the frame just above the swing arm.This didn't work for me, not sure what I was supposed to do once the pressure is applied? other than whack the end where the swing arm nut had been loosened. Anywhey, my really old work shop manual just says leave this to a specialist BSA Dealer. These are a bit like rocking horse manure these days, not very easy to find. Now the point of all this rambling on is, does any one know how the BSA Dealer would have achieved this. I'm sure there would have been a method such as mandrels and a press or something. If there was, my inclination is to try and replicate that. Also having been seperated can it be rebuilt using the original components, as with mine there is currently no play in the arm at all. My only other option is to spray the two in situ and see how it goes.
Regards Huddie

Offline alanp

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Re: Swing arm removal
« Reply #1 on: 29.07. 2009 18:47 »
Maybe I was lucky but when I took my swing arm out yesterday, I removed the spindle locking screw on the nearside, removed the spindle nut and washer on the offside and tapped it out with a rubber mallet followed up with gentle taps with a bar to ease the spindle out of the nearside. Then judicious taps with the rubber mallet and the swing arm came out. I could imagine the spindle being difficult if water had corroded the inside but mine was greased. I can't see any reason why the arm wouldn't come out once the spindle is out unless the inner sleeves of the metalastic bushes had recessd themselves into the frame lugs but your words indicate you haven't taken the spindle out yet, or have I misunderstood?
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Offline huddie

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Re: Swing arm removal
« Reply #2 on: 29.07. 2009 19:35 »
Hi Alanp    No your dead right I haven't got the spindle out yet. You seem to have been incredibly lucky as yours seems to have come apart nicely. To be honest I dont know how tight a fit the spindle should be?. Thinking about what you said I suppose the threaded bar idea I tried was to spread the frame a bit incase the bushes had recessed into the frame. All these horror stories I've read ,I assumed included the spindle being difficult to remove, or am I missing a trick
Thanks for you response. PS why are you removing your swing arm?
Huddie

Online trevinoz

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Re: Swing arm removal
« Reply #3 on: 29.07. 2009 23:35 »
Huddie,
             if it is rusted in, you have a problem. I have had the most difficulties with the hollow spindle type.
In the past I have had to destroy the spindle by drilling out the ends that pass through the frame and then try to clean out the rusted mess within the silent bloc bushes. Mostly destroy the silent blocs also.
When you reassemble, use anti corrosion compound.
I had the same problem with my Norton Atlas but as the bushes were good with play, I left it all together and painted the frame with the swinging arm in place. Difficult but achievable. When the bike is all together rough paint work can't be seen around the swinging arm attachment point.
Trev.

Offline alanp

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Re: Swing arm removal
« Reply #4 on: 30.07. 2009 09:32 »
Huddie, my swing arm is out so that I can have the frame powder and arm coated separately. I once had a bike which had the swing arm powder coated in the frame by a previous owner and the nearside spindle plate etc had been painted into the frame and looked awful. However, if you can't take out the spindle and you don't have any movement in the arm mounting, talk to your powder coater or spray painter about thoroughly masking the nearside spindle bits. Before you give up, spray WD 40 where the rain has got in and corrosion may have begun, between the arm ends and the insides of the frame, also around the plate on the nearside, leave it for an hour or so, or longer if you have the patience, and then give the spindle nut a good whack with something heavy to shock it and get that important first bit of movement. If the nut is a nyloc, turn it around so that the flat face faces outwards first though. Good luck.
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Online RichardL

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Re: Swing arm removal
« Reply #5 on: 30.07. 2009 16:07 »
If you have a choice, I think Gunk Liquid Wrench or 3-IN-1 High Performance Penetrant over WD-40 (3-IN-1 is a WD40 brand, so you would think they have a reason to sell a dedicated penetrant). I'd say, leave it overnight.

I like that Alan mentioned "...that improtant first bit of movement."  I think, by saying to turn the nut around, Alan was saying that the end of the spindle must not be hit directly with anything hard. Which is good (that is, imperative) advice. Consider the end grain of an oak block as the transition from your sledge hammer. After you're down to the last few threads that the nut can spin onto, remove the nut and drive the spindle directly with the wood block. If you get to where the end of the spindle is flushwith the plate, you might need to fashion an aluminum drift, else, you could try to grab the flanged end of the spindle and pull or pry. Hopefully, by this time, movement has become much easier.

Regarding, powder coating, there has been a great deal of discussion herein about whether or now the rubber in the bushes can take baking heat.

Finally, if I have said anything blatantly obvious, I apologize. It is purely and clearly form being a simpleton myself.

Richard L.   
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