Author Topic: Home-made tools  (Read 11782 times)

Offline LJ.

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #15 on: 08.12. 2007 22:31 »
looks like a tool for screwing up or out a hub bearing retainer
Speaking of which did you know front and rear are differentj

Correct! Now you got me wondering if I last used it for front or rear! Thanks! That means I gotta make another one now....  *lol*

Ride Safely Lads! LJ.
**********************
1940 BSA M20 500cc Girder/Rigid- (SOLD)
1947 BSA M21 600cc Girder/Rigid-Green
1949 BSA A7   500cc Girder/Plunger Star Twin-(SOLD)
1953 BSA B33  500cc Teles/Plunger-Maroon
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Blue
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Red

Online bsa-bill

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #16 on: 09.12. 2007 11:44 »
I don't know that the tool would not fit front and rear, maybe the holes are the same distance apart, I do know that the front and rear retainers are different as I bought a new one from C&D Autos and with their usual efficiency they pointed out the retainers had different part numbers.
This might account for the fact I could not get one of them to tighten, looked like it was wrong threaded ( which was the reason for the purchase of a new one)

Don't know what happened to my smilies in my last mail  *sad2*
All the best - Bill
1961 Flash - stock, reliable, steady, fantastic for shopping
1959 Rocket Gold Flash - blinged and tarted up  would have seizure if taken to  Tesco

Offline a10gf

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #17 on: 09.12. 2007 14:39 »
Some plunger hub stuff here http://www.a7a10.net/BSA/rearwheel.htm & http://www.a7a10.net/BSA/techpics/wbfront.jpg , I seem to remember I battled with the rear until discovering the LH threads...  *red*

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Offline LJ.

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #18 on: 23.05. 2008 18:36 »
I wonder if BSA made such a tool for pushing on the front wheel hub? I found it to be a bit of a pig to do today so an ingenuity had to be thought of... A good look around the workshop shed and I come across a filter that had been used in my sandblast cabinette. Resting the wheel on a kitchen washing up bowl and a good blow onto a mallet ensures the perfect job done!  *clap*

Ride Safely Lads! LJ.
**********************
1940 BSA M20 500cc Girder/Rigid- (SOLD)
1947 BSA M21 600cc Girder/Rigid-Green
1949 BSA A7   500cc Girder/Plunger Star Twin-(SOLD)
1953 BSA B33  500cc Teles/Plunger-Maroon
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Blue
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Red

Offline LJ.

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #19 on: 23.05. 2008 22:53 »
Yep! Indeed perfect, the rubber rubber seal saved the paint from getting damaged. The mallet although not home made was used as a flat block to save the filter from getting damaged when one hefty blow from the engineers hammer struck. The mallet is an old time tool for wooden ended chisels. Probably now-a-days a rubber hammer is used in stead.
Ride Safely Lads! LJ.
**********************
1940 BSA M20 500cc Girder/Rigid- (SOLD)
1947 BSA M21 600cc Girder/Rigid-Green
1949 BSA A7   500cc Girder/Plunger Star Twin-(SOLD)
1953 BSA B33  500cc Teles/Plunger-Maroon
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Blue
1961 BSA A10  650cc Golden Flash-Red

Offline snowbeard

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #20 on: 28.05. 2008 23:53 »


for removing the rear wheel bearing, I think this was to hold the bearing to remove it from the spindle/spacer

and the end of the bar is ground to use to pound on just the outer race thru the hub



just about everything in my toolkit is homemade so far...
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Online RichardL

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #21 on: 20.08. 2008 05:47 »
Well, I never found my lost pushrod comb (mentioned under "Spending Money" in chat). Again, being too impatient and too cheap (especially when I know there is one lying around here), I made my own by copying a photo from eBay, pasting it to AutoCad (drafting program), scaling it using the known dimension between rockerbox studs, printing it, gluing it to a piece of sheet metal and cutting it out on my band saw. After a small amount of filing, it worked and here it is.

Richard
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2017 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDE on September 30, 2018. Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Offline tombeau

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #22 on: 20.08. 2008 08:21 »
I've got long,skinny fingers. After spending about 10 minutes faffing about with the comb I discovered I didnt need it.
I have a fork puller upper made from an old top nut and some threaded rod and nuts.
I've also got a fork seal holder remover like Beezalex's. A friend knocked it up whilst watching me fail to remove one with my usual trick of using a big jubilee clip around a bit of old inner tube and a pair of stilsens.

Cheers,
Tombeau

Offline olev

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #23 on: 10.12. 2008 12:16 »
I removed the blind camshaft bush in the drive side crankcase tonight.
The head of a 1/4" X 2 1/2" mushroom head (or cup head) bolt just fits in the bore and can be hooked under the back of the bush. lay a piece of metal with a hole over the thread, add a nut and wind her out.
It was all over before the first beer was opened.
hmmm.. that doesn't seem to make much sense. should have stopped after the first beer.

Offline a10gf

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #24 on: 27.08. 2009 13:47 »
To revive this topic, my latest invention (version 0.9). Anybody spots what it does ?
(spanner not used or related, size ref only)

A10 GF '53 My A10 website
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Offline terryk

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #25 on: 27.08. 2009 14:34 »
I'd say its for plug hole to mark top dead center and timing before TDC
1950-53 A10 rigid/plungers, 1958-61 A10 super rockets, 1947-50 A7 longstrokes, 1949 Star twin,
1951-54 A7 plungers, 1940s M21, WDM20s,
1948-50s B33s rigid/plunger/swingarm, 1948-50s b31s rigid/plunger/swingarm

Offline a10gf

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #26 on: 27.08. 2009 15:14 »
Yes, timing.

90 deg to piston. The bottom clip (11\32 width) on to mark TDC, 2nd clip goes on, removing 1st clip, rotating crank, bar slides freely following piston, carefully watching for 2nd clip to bottom out.
Presto 11\32 advance.

Just another twist to the piece of wire 'tool'. Took some time though to find some parts that could be used.

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"Success only gets you a ticket to a much more difficult task"

Online RichardL

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #27 on: 27.08. 2009 16:30 »
Erling,

Perhaps you recall my own home-made version shown at http://www.a7a10.net/forum/index.php?topic=156.msg5969#msg5969

Your's seems a bit less tedious in the usage but a bit more complicated in the fabrication.

Richard L.
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2017 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDE on September 30, 2018. Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Offline Desburnett

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #28 on: 27.08. 2009 23:21 »
Just looking through some old posts and read the technique of removing the blind camshaft bush using a modified bolt arrangement.
The trick way to remove blind bushes is to obtain a dowel / shaft close to the internal diameter (smaller)of the bush, fill the bush with heavy duty grease then insert the dowel into the bush and strike the end with a hammer.
The dowel acts hydraulicly on the grease which forces the bush out of its blind cavity.

Online RichardL

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #29 on: 02.10. 2009 23:55 »
Borrowing a page from LJ's book, I bodged together (his wasn't bodged) this pump for sucking oil out of the tank. The piston is an old scrap from someone trying to turn a bed knob, or something, on the wood lathe in the shop attached to my office. I turned an electric hand drill into a lathe of my own to cut the groove for the o-ring. I think, all together, parts around $10, plus some junk in the garage. It worked well, except when I stuffed a stiff wire up the tube (as shown). I'm going to try lashing the stiff wire to the outside of the tube.

Hope this isn't too boring.

Richard L.

Edit: Oh, no! Sloppy work area showing. I am devastated.
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2017 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDE on September 30, 2018. Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.