Author Topic: Home-made tools  (Read 12125 times)

Offline BVSR

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #60 on: 20.02. 2018 08:16 »
Cush drive and mainshaft nut loosening/tightening tools:
Markku
A7 1961    A10GF 1954    A10GF 1960    A10GF 1961 sidecar    A10SR 1958    A10SR 1959 
A10SR 1960   A10SR -61  A10SR 1963    A10SR 1963   A65T 1968    A65L 1968   B25SS 1971    B31 1952  
B31 1952   B33 1947  B33 1951   DBD34 GS 1958    NSU Supermax 1962    Husqvarna 510TE 1984
Finland[/iu

Online RichardL

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #61 on: 20.02. 2018 11:48 »
Good ones. I believe I'm gonna make me one of them bars.

Richard L.
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020 (if it's not cancelled and we are free to move about by then). Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.

Offline Colsbeeza

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #62 on: 21.02. 2018 02:35 »
I made this for the Timing Side Pinion in 1969 for my 1957 A7. Worked quite well.
Colsbeeza
Australia

Online Greybeard

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #63 on: 28.02. 2018 11:58 »
Tools what I have made:
1) Engine bench mount; bolts onto gearbox mounting holes. Single long bolt goes through bench allowing rotation.
2) Fork seal tool. Made from an old bit of tube and strengthened with a piece of exhaust pipe.
3) Plunger spring compressor. Method now superceded.
4) Fork stanchion puller-upper. Threaded rod with an old stanchion nut welded on and then ground down to fit through the yoke hole.
5) BTDC stop. When cylinder head is off this is bolted straight to block using head bolts with spacers. Engine is reversed then slowly brought forward to the stop screw which is set to stop the piston at correct BTDC.
6) Dynamo blanking piece, (quickly made) so I could ride the bike to the dynamo repair man, (chain removed of course) without getting too much muck in the chamber.
7) Cylinder head gasket locating studs, made from old head bolts. Just stops the gasket moving while I get the head back on.
8) Petrol pipe ferrule crimper, made out of a large nut cut in half. Use vice to squeeze together.

ITHANKYOU!

Offline Colsbeeza

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #64 on: 18.06. 2018 01:37 »
Speedo Needle Tool made in 1969. Just found it in a clean-up.
Colsbeeza
Australia

Online RichardL

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Re: Home-made tools
« Reply #65 on: 06.04. 2019 19:55 »
Well, this could have gone in the continuing story of trying to get my forks to slide freely in the legs from my A7, but that is such old news now. Winter here was really cold a lot of the time, so the garage was not that much fun.

Anyway, I came up with this idea for a fork-leg hone that would reach past the pin at the bottom of the leg. It's an old stantion with a notch cut for emery paper and driven with a drill motor using the nut from my homemade stantion installation tool.

Here is a link to a video of it getting used. https://youtu.be/zo-11td_uB4 .  Been busy, so I haven't even tested the leg since running the hone. I'll let you know if it worked, helped, or is the destroyer of worlds.

Richard L.
Plan on signing up for the world-wide 2020 DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN'S RIDEon September 27, 2020 (if it's not cancelled and we are free to move about by then). Watch website at https://www.gentlemansride.com for details.