Author Topic: inline fuse  (Read 4090 times)

Offline old PJ

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inline fuse
« on: 29.12. 2007 20:26 »
Hi all i have put the battery in the bike today and i was thinking about a inline fuse holder and a fuse of  about 10 amps is this ok to do and will a 10 amp fuse be ok . I have one of them plastic inline car push fit fuse holders to put inline .

Thanks
Old PJ 

Offline a10gf

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #1 on: 29.12. 2007 21:25 »
This is a more than good idea, can save a lot of troubles, and costs next to nothing. I can't understand really why som fuse was not standard since the invention of the battery.

I have been using an 8 amp fuse since I got the bike. And it did find it's use, blown a few times, trough shorts that happened while riding, and while doing repairs without taking the time to unplug it.

e.

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Online groily

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #2 on: 29.12. 2007 21:45 »
If you're running 12 volts 10 amps or less might be OK - but if you're on 6 volt IMHO and experience, you'll need more to allow safely for the surge when you turn the headlamp on. If, for example, you're running a 36 watt bulb, plus tail etc lights, say 40 watts plus all told, then that's nigh on 7 amps constant - but far more more in 'surge current' when you first hit the switch and the filament warms up. The fuse might take it, or it might not. After a couple of failures with 10 ampers, I've gone for 20 amps on my 6 volt bike - it'll blow well enough if there's a fault, but doesn't plunge me into darkness when I turn the headlight on or swap from main to dip beam - a constant source of possible surges with the traditional switches employed. Even with the bare glimmer of 25 watt bulbs, which are as much use as a bedside candle to a blind man, 10 amps can blow. Max surge can, I'm told, amount to three times rated requirement - so for 25 watts plus 5 watts tail plus 2 watts speedo - 32 watts, that's 6.33 amps, which could become way more than 10 amps for a long-enough millisecond.
With the 12 volts conversion installed on another bike, I use household 13 amp fuses (notional load 156 watts) because I have gazillions of old plugs with them in. Modern blade fuses are fine, so are the old spring-loaded cylindrical in-line jobbies, although they need the blobs of solder/tin that touch each end of the fuse to be clean - and cleaned periodically, especially in winter. One thing's for sure - a bike without at least one properly fused circuit is a hazard waiting to go bang - especially if the wiring is not accessible and rippable-out when things start to sizzle! Hope that helps, Groily
Bill

Offline a10gf

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #3 on: 30.12. 2007 00:10 »
I'll correct my post above, it's a 10 A (red) flat car-type fuse. Suppose they are quite slow-blowing and can take some short surge.  No problems in use, 6v, with a 35w halogen front. As Groily writes, a total short will blow a quite larger fuse as well, long before any harm done to wirings or components.

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Offline LJ.

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #4 on: 30.12. 2007 09:49 »

Yes Fuses are a must have *ex* Cant remember what I have on the Red A10 and have not looked under the seat of the Blue A10 so I dont know if there are any there. One thing I know is another must have.... and that is making them accessable for when they do blow. Mine is wired into the tool box just beside the regulator so I dont have to unscrew and remove the seat, how many times have I had to do that ???? dont ask.
Ride Safely Lads! LJ.
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1940 BSA M20 500cc Girder/Rigid- (SOLD)
1947 BSA M21 600cc Girder/Rigid-Green
1949 BSA A7   500cc Girder/Plunger Star Twin-(SOLD)
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Offline fido

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #5 on: 30.12. 2007 10:32 »
I can only agree with the others. Even if your bike is otherwise totally original as it left the factory you should regard a fuse as an essential part of the wiring. It is hard to understand how the bike manufacturers were blind to this logic but it is a very simple defficiency to rectify.

Offline Mosin

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #6 on: 08.07. 2009 14:27 »
Just out of interest, where abouts in the wiring harness are people putting their fuses? I would have thought that the obvious place would be between the positive terminal of the battery and its earthing point on the frame, but does anyone have any better ideas?
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Offline fido

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #7 on: 08.07. 2009 17:32 »
I fit the inline type fuse holder, as used on car radios and put it in the negative wire from harness to battery.

Offline BSA_54A10

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #8 on: 09.07. 2009 12:55 »
I am a bit anal about fuses.
Usually I fit 3
On each side of the battery ( 15A ) and one on the feed wire from the regulator to the light switch ( 20A ).
I first started using the big clunky "fully water proof" marine jobs but getting a good splice into the loom was not easy.
Now I am using these "semi waterproof" ones with much thinner wires that will fit nicely into standard crimp terminals.
The internal connection is via a standard crimp on spade so if you like you can cut the original wires and crimp them into the fuse holders and keep the original colour codes.
For many years I have been doing it this way.

The plug is fitted to the battery and then the terminals are painted over with liquid electrical tape.

The other side of the plug goes to these fuses which I have found to be perfectly suitable. You can cut a piece of steel strip to fit into the gang slot to mount them on your bike.

The 3 fuses ganged together
Bike Beesa
Trevor

Offline duTch

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #9 on: 30.03. 2016 11:28 »

 I was looking for something else and came across this, but figured I'd give this a trot; a few names I was familiar with when I joined up, but haven't seen for a while *????*

 Back on track, I have fuses where fuses don't normally go after dark *eek*
 
 Trev those are the batteries I had been using , but can't get them anymore- well unless they had a new delivery *????* President sold out to Lion Battery up here
Started building in about 1977/8 a on average '52 A10 -built from bits 'n pieces never resto intended -maybe 'personalised'
Have a '74 850T Moto Guzzi since '92-best thing I ever bought doesn't need a kickstart 'cos it bump starts sooooooooo(mostly) easy
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Online Triton Thrasher

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #10 on: 30.03. 2016 19:14 »
A fuse in the battery earth lead is useful when you set a spanner down so it touches the battery live terminal and a bare metal part of the bike.

Or when the screwdriver you're using to attach the live lead to the battery touches the battery box.

Offline nimrod650

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #11 on: 30.03. 2016 19:43 »
inline blade fuses 10-25 amp with a trip and  re set button on bay¬£1-94p item 141763252823

Offline muskrat

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #12 on: 30.03. 2016 20:34 »
I like the look of those. I blew 1/2 dozen normal ones looking for a short.
Cheers
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Online Triton Thrasher

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #13 on: 30.03. 2016 21:03 »
While looking for a short, put a small bulb in circuit.

Offline kiwipom

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Re: inline fuse
« Reply #14 on: 30.03. 2016 21:13 »
hi guys, yes fuses are a must so i redesigned the wiring and fused everything,cheers
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